Blog

Securing China’s Nuclear Energy Development

By Hui Zhang
Chinese president Xi Jinping said in his address at the 2014 Nuclear Security Summit that, “we should place equal emphasis on development [of nuclear energy] and security, and develop nuclear energy on the premise of security.” He further emphasized that, “developing nuclear energy at the expense of security can neither be sustainable nor bring real development. Only by adopting credible steps and safeguards can we keep the risks under effective control and develop nuclear energy in a sustainable way.”

Piecing together Turkey’s Iran policy

Aaron SteinAaron Stein outlines Turkey's strategic approach to Iran's nuclear program. Turkey's policy, he argues, is based on robust assumptions about the strength of Turkey's military, the credibility of NATO's deterrent power, and the value of the Turkish-Iranian economic relationship, and is therefore unlikely to change no matter the outcome of Iran's negotiations with the P5+1.

What Kind of Material Needs What Level of Security?

By Matthew Bunn

In August of 2002, the United States – assisted by a gift from the Nuclear Threat Initiative, when it turned out no U.S. agency had money that was not blocked from doing what was needed – helped airlift 48 kilograms of 80% enriched highly enriched uranium out of the Vinca nuclear research institute in Serbia.  A force of 1,200 armed troops guarded the shipment as it moved from the lab to the airport.  Under international rules, this was dangerous “Category I” material requiring the highest level of security. But under Department of Energy (DOE) rules for categorizing nuclear material, if the same material had been at a DOE site, it would have been considered “Category III” material requiring hardly any security.