Classes

    The Einstein Revolution

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2017

    Albert Einstein has become the icon of modern science. Following his scientific, cultural, philosophical, and political trajectory, this course aims to track the changing role of physics in the 20th- and 21st- centuries. Addresses Einstein's engagement with relativity, quantum mechanics, Nazism, nuclear weapons, philosophy, and technology, and raises basic questions about what it means to understand physics and its history. This is a hybrid course that will combine online lessons with an active, participatory class structure.

    HEB 1420: Human Evolutionary Anatomy

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2017

    How did the human body evolve, and how does it develop, grow and function? This course provides an integrative regional overview of human anatomy, with an emphasis on the musculo-skeletal system, and a comparative approach to the evolution of modern anatomy. Additional topics include skeletal and dental development, and gross anatomy of the nervous, circulatory, and digestive systems.

    HEB 1210: Research in Comparative Biomechanics

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2017

    This class introduces students to experimental techniques used to investigate the structure and physiology of humans. Students undertake a supervised research project in the Skeletal Biology and Biomechanics Laboratory. Students meet to introduce their project, discuss their work and progress, and to present their final results. An extensive commitment of time in the laboratory is required. Grades are based on the work completed, the oral presentation, and a short research paper.

    HEB 2100: Diet and Exercise (seminar)

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2017

    This seminar considers evolutionary factors underlying how variations in diet and exercise affect the human body. Why do we tend to crave foods rich in fat and sugar? How unhealthful are saturated fats? Why has the prevalence of food allergies skyrocketed? Why are we so susceptible to sports injuries? Is exercise really medicine?

    Life Sciences 2: Evolutionary Human Physiology and Anatomy

    Semester: 

    Fall

    Offered: 

    2018

    Why is the human body the way that it is? This course explores human anatomy and physiology from an integrated framework, combining functional, comparative, and evolutionary perspectives on how organisms work. Major topics, which follow a life-course framework, include embryogenesis, metabolism and energetics, growth and development, movement and locomotion, food and digestion, stress and disease, and reproduction. Also considered is the relevance of human biology to contemporary issues in human health and biology.

    Science of Living Systems 16: Human Evolution and Human Health

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2017

    How and why did humans evolve to be the way we are, and what are the implications of our evolved anatomy and physiology for human health in a post-industrial world? Why do we get sick, and how can we use principles of evolution to improve health and wellbeing? To address these questions, this course reviews the major transitions that occurred in human evolution, from the divergence of the ape and human lineages to the origins of modern humans. Also considered are the many effects of recent cultural and technological shifts such as agriculture and industrialization on human health.

    Performance Studies: An Introduction

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2017

     

    How is performance an object of study, a methodology, and an analytic? This seminar is an introduction to performance studies, an interdisciplinary field in conversation with theater studies, gender studies, anthropology, philosophy, literary theory, visual studies, dance studies, ethnic studies, queer theory, and post-colonial studies. Students will study and experiment with performance while reading theoretical texts to grapple with concepts including ritual, restored behavior, performativity, mimicry, liveness, the body, objecthood, archive, and movement.

     

    Plagues and Politics: The Impact of AIDS on U.S. Culture

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2017

     

    This course will survey the AIDS epidemic in the United States from 1981 to the present. We will examine the history and social impact of the epidemic by exploring its immediate and long lasting effects on issues such as health care, anti-discrimination law, immigration, education strategies, government drug policies, welfare services, as well as glbt culture. We will also be examining its effects on popular thinking on sex and gender through mainstream and independent film and a wide range of visual arts. 

    Staging Protest

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2017

     

    This class explores the relationship between performance and protest from a range of disciplinary approaches and media, including theater, performance art, street protest, and social media. Course units will be organized around case studies including the Third World Liberation Front Strike, HIV/AIDS activism, #BlackLivesMatter, and sexual assault and campus safety. We will develop and challenge genealogies of protest performance while experimenting with our own embodied performances of the political.

    Additional Information

    Bodies/Archives/Databases

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2017

    Our museums and computers store bodies. Some are physical, appearing as material objects or as the “negative space” around them, and others are abstracted. The 2016-17 Gender and Sexuality Seminar Series interrogates the space between the archive, site of haunted specificity and historical embeddedness, and the database, locus of standardization and generalizable knowledge about human normativity, pathology, and variation.

    Additional Information:

    PED-250Y B: Second-Year Policy Analysis Seminar

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2016

    Instructor: Rema Hanna

    This is a required second-year paper for students in the MPA/ID program, aimed at integrating course work through the application of analytic tools to a policy and institutional problem. The goal is to produce recommendations for policymakers that are technically rigorous, practical, and politically relevant. Students will work with seminar leaders and faculty advisors to conceptualize policy and institutional problems for a client.

    PED-102: Economic Development: Using Analytical Frameworks for Smart Policy Design

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2016

    Instructors: Asim Khwaja, Lant Pritchett

    This semester-long course examines how economic theory and rigorous evidence can be harnessed to design development policies that respond to market and political failures in developing economies. The course builds on the analytical framework and evidence base provided in PED-101 (which is a prerequisite). Topics covered include: Policies for Productivity Growth, Policy Design for Markets in Human and Financial Capital, Governance Reform and Environmental and Climate Change Policy Design. Prerequisite: PED-101.

    API-110: Advanced Microeconomic Analysis II

    Semester: 

    Spring

    Offered: 

    2016

    Instructors: Asim Khwaja

    This is the second semester of a rigorous two-semester sequence in advanced microeconomic analysis for MPA/ID students. Topics covered include general equilibrium, externalities and public goods, welfare economics, game theory, economics of information, incentives, and contracts. Theory is illustrated by relevant applications to international development and other areas.

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