Presentations

Blazar, D., Hill, H., Humez, A., & Lynch, K. (2014, April). Predictors of teachers’ instructional practices. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), Philadelphia, PA.

Cheung, A. (2014, March). The rise of Asian Americans? How mainstream discourse continues to harm the Asian American community. 12th Annual Alumni of Color Conference, Cambridge, MA. Abstract: In the mainstream media, Asian Americans are often discursively cast as “model minorities”. Much research literature, meanwhile, seldom focuses on Asian Americans, and when they do, also engage with the trope of Asian Americans as universally high-achieving. Such representations are glaringly incomplete, and inhibit authentic understandings of the complex Asian American demographic in both research and practice. Contact: amc078@mail.harvard.edu

Cheung, A. (2013, October). An “appropriate way to protest”: Discourses regulating civic protest in China.  39th Annual Meeting of the Association for Moral Education, Montréal, Canada. Abstract: In this exploratory analysis, we used Foucauldian Discourse Analysis to examine in-depth the reaction of Chinese 11th grade students to the real-life story of Chen, a teenager that publicly protested against a subway renovation in Southern China.  Examination revealed several prominent discourses around the role of government and rules that bounded what was considered to be appropriate forms of civic engagement. Analysis conducted with Yiran Zhao, You Guo Jiang and Xiaojun Li.  Contact: amc078@mail.harvard.edu.

Diazgranados, S. & Noonan, J. (2013, October). The effect of safe and participatory school environments on children’s supportive attitudes toward violence: Evidence from Colombia. 39th Annual Meeting of the Association for Moral Education, Montréal, Québec, Canada. Abstract: In this study, we examine the effect of school environments on individual students’ attitudes toward violence among 97,971 students in 1,649 schools in Colombia. Using multi-level Tobit analysis, we find that children taught in safe and participatory climates are less tolerant of violence, with the effect of participatory climates twice that of safe climates. We further conclude that safe and participatory environments lead to the least supportive attitudes toward violence, more than one standard deviation lower than unsafe and non-participatory. Contact: sid886@mail.harvard.edu or jmn772@mail.harvard.edu

Fay, J. (2104, March) The Moral Foundations of Objections to School Closure. Philosophy of Education Society, annual conference, Albuquerque, NM. Abstract: This paper explores three potential moral claims underpinning popular objections to school closure: parental rights, existing value, and schools as democratic institutions. He argues that while each may reflect a compelling value, neither parental rights nor existing value sufficiently support an objection to closure. Contact: jzf554@mail.harvard.edu

Fay, J. (2013, November) "Liberalism in its Original Sense": Milton Friedman in Conversation with Progressive Education. Society for U.S. Intellectual History, annual conference, Irvine, CA. Abstract: This paper highlights the political nature of the postwar critique of progressive education and situates Milton Friedman's early work, "The Role of Government in Education" within that context. Contact: jzf554@mail.harvard.edu

Grossman, P., Cohen, J., Ronfeldt, M., Brown, L., Lynch, K., & Chin, M. (2013, November). How well do teacher observations predict value-added? Exploring variability across districts. Paper presented at the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM) Conference, Washington, DC.

Higdon, J. (2012, April). Pedagogy and attitudes toward immigrants in Europe. American Educational Research Association Annual Conference, Vancouver, BC. Abstract: In this analysis, structural equation modeling is used to examine the relationship between pedagogy and positive intergroup attitudes in several European nations, using the 2008-9 IEA International Civic and Citizenship Education Study. Contact: jhv550@mail.harvard.edu

Higdon, J. (2013, May). National identity, European identity, and attitudes toward ‘others’ in European adolescents. Association for Psychological Science, Washington, DC. Abstract: This study draws upon Social Identity Theory (Tajfel, 1974; Tajfel & Turner, 1979), Self-Categorization Theory (Turner & Oakes, 1989) and the Common Ingroup Identity Model ( Gaertner et al, 1993), to empirically examine differences between national and European identity, and their relationship with attitudes toward "others" among adolescents in Europe. Contact: jhv550@mail.harvard.edu

Higdon, J. (2013, November). Symposium: Research on civic learning and engagement using international large scale assessments. National Council for the Social Studies, CUFA, annual meeting, St. Louis, Missouri. Abstract: The symposium’s purpose is to present and interpret analysis of survey data concerning the social and political attitudes of early adolescents in Europe drawn from the IEA International Civics and Citizenship Study (ICCSS 2009) and to consider implication for civic education and for future studies (including multi-method research).  Contact: jhv550@mail.harvard.edu

Kwok, J. (2013, October). I tweet therefore I think: Media influence and public dialogue on Twitter. 39th Annual Meeting of the Association for Moral Education, Montréal, Canada. Abstract: This paper provides an analysis of Twitter discussions that occurred in June 2013 during the first 12 hours after the Supreme Court announced its decisions on each of four greatly anticipated cases concerning issues of civic interest (Voting Rights Act, Affirmative Action, Defense of Marriage Act and Proposition 8). The focus of this project is on changing role of media institutions and individuals, and the civic implications of these online discussions. Contact: jyk793@mail.harvard.edu

Lynch, K. (2013, April). Civic discourse and citizenship development in the mathematics classroom. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), San Francisco, CA. (Also Session Chair)

Lynch, K. (2013, April). Civic discourse and peer group collaboration in mathematics classrooms in the US, Hong Kong SAR, and Japan. Poster presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD), Seattle, WA.

Lynch, K. (2012, October). Mathematics instruction and civic engagement: Theoretical frameworks. Paper presented at the biennial meeting of the Equity and Quality in Education Conference, Beijing, China.

Lynch, K., and Star, J. R. (2012, October). Views of less-prepared students on instruction incorporating the comparison of multiple strategies in Algebra I. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME-NA), Kalamazoo, MI.

Lynch, K., & Star, J. R. (2011, April). Exploring relationships between mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) and teachers' implementation of curricula. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA), New Orleans, LA.

Lynch, K., & Star, J.R. (2010, October). Teaching mathematics with multiple strategies in middle and high school. Paper presented at the 32nd annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME-NA), Columbus, Ohio.

McAllister-Grande, B. (2013, June). Idealist philosophy and the humanities at mid-twentieth Century Yale. International Society for Intellectual History, conference, Princeton, NJ. Abstract: This paper examines an effort at Yale to place philosophy at the center of the humanities and the sciences. Specifically, it deals with Neo-Idealist philosophers brought to Yale to unify the various fields of knowledge and teach undergraduates democratic and Christian foundations in a time of expanding American influence around the world. Contact: bwm561@mail.harvard.edu

McAllister-Grande, B. (2013, November). Searching for modern unity: The liberal learning debates at World War II. Society for U.S. Intellectual History, annual conference, Irvine, CA. Abstract: Updated version of paper noted above.

Newton, K., Star, J.R., & Lynch, K. (2009, September). Exploring procedural flexibility in struggling algebra students. Paper presented at the thirty-first annual meeting of the North American chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME-NA). Atlanta, Georgia.

Noonan, J. (2010, March). Reimagining teacher professional development and citizenship education: Lessons for import from Colombia. Comparative and International Education Society, Chicago, ILAbstract: This paper examines the role of teachers in the implementation of citizenship education in Colombia (Patti & Cepeda, 2007), combining a case study of a pilot project in rural Colombia with an overall examination of citizenship education and participatory pedagogy (Freire, 1970; Dewey, 1938; Adalbjarnardóttir, 2002).  Contact: jmn772@mail.harvard.edu.

Noonan, J.M. (2013, June). In here, out there: Making schools safe for uncertainty. Ethnographic and Qualitative Research Conference, Cedarville, OHAbstract: Using the portraiture methodology of qualitative research (Lawrence-Lightfoot & Davis, 1997), I employ observational data and semi-structured interviews with administrators and teachers at an urban middle school to examine an approach to professional learning that sees schools as learning organizations and increased comfort with uncertainty as a core feature of learning.  Contact: jmn772@mail.harvard.edu.

Quinn, D., Lynch, K., & Kim, J. S. (2014, March). Replicating the moderating role of income status on summer school effects across subject areas: A meta-analysis. Paper presented at the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness (SREE), Washington, DC.

Star, J., Rittle-Johnson, B., Durkin, K., Newton, K., Pollack, C., Lynch, K., & Gogolen, C. (2013, March). The impact of a comparison curriculum in Algebra I: A randomized experiment. Paper presented at the conference of the Society for Research on Educational Effectiveness (SREE), Washington, DC.