Courses


This page lists courses on qualitative methods at Harvard and other local universities.    The courses are not offered every semester, so check course catalogs for availability. We invite you to contact instructors to determine if they accept students from outside their department or school.  Also, please contact your Director of Graduate Studies to determine if you can receive Harvard credit for non-Harvard courses.

U = Primarily for undergraduates        G = Primarily for graduate students


General Methods

Sociology 209: Qualitative Social Analysis: Seminar (G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Science – Sociology
Examines approaches to non-numerical data used by social scientists to obtain valid, reliable, and meaningful insight into the social world through the analysis of ethnographic field notes, interview transcripts, and archival and other interpretative data.
Note: Required of and ordinarily limited to first-year graduate students in Sociology. 

Sociology 235: Advanced Qualitative Methods (G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Science – Sociology
Explores qualitative research methods with a focus on interviewing, case studies, comparative case analysis, and ethnography, and with particular attention to international/transnational research. Geared towards students who are conducting fieldwork and/or collecting data.
Note: Intended for students who have already taken sociology 209 or its equivalent.

Sociology 98Ha: Sociology of Health (U)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Science – Sociology
Examines how culture, politics, and finance "matters" in health care through an exploration of the diverse community health centers and major medical centers throughout greater Boston. Students will enhance their qualitative research skills through ethnographic observation, mapping, and historical and documentary analysis of the services provided and populations served in various clinical settings.
Note: Required of and limited to Sociology concentrators. Spring Junior Tutorials are by assignment only.

Government 50 - Introduction to Political Science Research Methods (U)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences - Government
This class will introduce students to techniques used for research in the study of politics. Students will learn to think systematically about research design and causality, how data and theory fit together, and how to measure the quantities we care about. Students will learn a `toolbox' of methods---including statistical software---that enable them to execute their research plans. This class is highly recommended for those planning to write a senior thesis.

Government 62: Research Practice in Qualitative Methods (U)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences – Government
With the goal of preparing students to undertake original research, this course introduces students to basic principles and tools of qualitative research in the social sciences. Focus is on comparative research design and the principal tools of qualitative research. Topics examined include the pitfalls of selection bias, the logic of causal inference, measurement and conceptualization, and the potential of mixed methods. Research techniques covered are process tracing, analytic narratives, natural experiments, archival research, interviews, and ethnography.

Government 2010. Strategies for Political Inquiry (U, G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences - Government
Research design for causal inference in qualitative and quantitative studies. Topics covered include measurement, conceptualization, case studies, the relationship between large-n and small-n studies, process-tracing, surveys, field experiments, and natural experiments, with examples of their use in political science. Note: Primarily for graduate students; may also be taken by undergraduates preparing for senior thesis research.

S-504 Introduction to Qualitative Research (G)
Harvard Graduate School of Education
How does one collect, analyze, and write about data collected from a small number of people who were neither randomly sampled nor numerous enough to serve as the basis for statistically significant generalizations about the populations from which they are drawn? This course will teach students to answer this question by providing a survey of various kinds of qualitative research methods; walking them through the process of formulating a research question; selecting the kinds of research participants and qualitative research methods that can answer the research question; collecting qualitative data to answer the question; analyzing the data; finding the proper fit between theories, data, and practice; and writing an academic paper based on the data. Each student will write a paper based on a small research project (on a topic of the student’s own choosing), and develop the skills to evaluate various qualitative research methods through close readings of scholarly work and discussions of student research projects in small workshops. No prerequisites or previous course work is necessary for this course.

S507: Interviewing in Qualitative Research (G)
Harvard Graduate School of Education
This course explores qualitative interviewing as a research strategy and as a practice. The focus of the course is on learning the craft of interviewing. This course is apprenticeship-based, designed so that students can situate their own qualitative interviewing experiences in the context of readings and discussions that critically engage theoretical and methodological issues and debates. Students will engage in the mentored practice of interviewing through a research project based at a local community-based organization. Interviewing can be thought of as a conversation in relationship, an inherently interpersonal and social enterprise. Students will build relationships within this organization that span from initiating the research to collecting data to discussing analyses to reporting on findings. We will discuss ethical issues in qualitative research and consider how researcher positionality, identity, and power differentials between the researcher and participants impact on the research process. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own personal approach to interviewing in the context of a democratic learning community, where we support each other's development as researchers committed to social justice in education.
Note: Permission of instructor required. Enrollment is limited. Ed.D. students given preference. Students who have taken S-710C should not take this course. 

HBS 4070: Design of Field Research Methods (G)
Harvard Business School
Field research involves collecting original data (qualitative or quantitative) in field sites. The course will combine informal lecture and discussion with practical sessions designed to build specific skills for conducting field research in organizations. Readings include books and papers about research methodology, as well as articles that provide exemplars of field research, including both theory driven and phenomenon driven work. Specific topics covered include variance versus process models, blending qualitative and quantitative data (in one paper, one study, or one career), collecting and analyzing different kinds of data (observation interview, survey, archival), levels of analysis, construct development, and writing up field research for publication. A core aim of the course is to help students understand the contingent relationship between the nature of the research question and the field research methods used to answer it, and to use this understanding to design and carry out original field research. Course requirements include several short assignments assessing readings and a final paper designed to help students' further their own field research goals. 

HBS 4852: Seminar on the Craft of Inductive Qualitative Research (G)
Harvard Business School
This seminar provides a forum to demystify the craft of qualitative inductive research. How do field notes get transformed into published books and articles? How does theory get built and substantiated? What is the behind the scenes process successful scholars are using? Our goal is to look behind the curtain and understand the art and science of writing up this work. It is also to gain an appreciation for the variety of ways in which people work. Towards this end, the seminar will be composed of two parts: 1) learning from others and 2) learning by doing. The first part of each class will involve uncovering the story behind a published piece of work, written by a leading scholar. The second part of each class will involve class participants sharing their own writing based on on-going research projects. This writing can take the form of full paper or much earlier stage memos, outlines or other writing sample. The seminar is offered as a Pass/Fail course and has three requirements: In preparation for each class, participants will read the piece of work by the leading scholar, and possibly some earlier drafts, memos, or reviews. For each class, participants will also be provided a writing sample distributed by one of the class participants, whose week it is to share their work. Participants will be responsible for sharing their work during at least one class session. This course is open to doctoral students who have successfully completed their first-year of graduate work and are engaged in inductive qualitative research projects ideally with data. Permission of the instructors is required for all enrollees.

SUP 107M: Qualitative Methods in Policy Research (G)
Harvard Kennedy School of Government
(Previously offered as API-207) Qualitative methods are often essential in policy research, offering crucial insights into how a policy or program is actually implemented on the ground, how participants understand it, and how it plays out for individuals in specific cultural contexts living complex daily lives. The first half of the course introduces students to a variety of qualitative data collection techniques, including participant observation and in-depth interviewing, as well as how to formulate a research question, develop a research design, negotiate access to a research site or population, and satisfy human subjects’ concerns. The second half of the course is devoted to qualitative analysis. In addition to readings and discussion, students will try their hand at a variety of data-collection and analysis techniques. The course’s emphasis will be on the types of data-gathering techniques and analytical approaches that are most effective in policy-relevant research. Offered in the second module of Fall 2011.

SUP-913: Research Design and Research Methods for Fieldwork (G)
Harvard Kennedy School
In this seminar, class participants will learn two critical qualitative data-collection techniques, in-depth interviews and focused ethnography. The course will emphasize how to deploy these methods to address critical policy questions that surveys and experiments can not always resolve. Learning will be hands-on, as each student plays a critical role in launching a policy-focused, multi-site, qualitative study that will go into the field in May of 2013--part of a mixed-method study of housing tradeoffs among families with young children. As a team, faculty and students will read key theoretical and substantive work in the area, develop an in-depth interview guide and a protocol for a focused ethnography, engage in significant pilot testing of these instruments, and work to solve logistical issues. The goal of the course is to teach students how to design and implement a qualitative component to surveys and field experiments. Permission of the instructor required for non-doctoral students.

SHDH288 Qualitative Research Methods in Public Health (G)
Harvard School of Public Health
Qualitative research can be used alone or in combination with quantitative research to investigate public health questions. This introductory-level course begins by examining the variety of potential uses of qualitative methods in public health research and diverse qualitative research approaches. The course then explores specific topics, including: "entering" the community to conduct qualitative research; applying theory to study design and open-ended questions; ensuring study rigor; developing theory-based research questions, specific data collection methods (including, but not limited to, semi-structured interviews, focus groups, participant observation); sampling for qualitative studies; data management; data analysis; writing results and research proposals; and considerations for choosing qualitative methods at each stage of a mixed-methods qualitative or mixed-methods qualitative/quantitative study. Students will be required to participate in class discussions, apply concepts covered in class through assignments to collect and analyze qualitative data, critique qualitative works, and propose a qualitative study. Offered in the first module of Fall 2011.

SSCI E-100b Graduate Research Methods and Scholarly Writing in the Social Sciences: Government and History (G)
Harvard Extension School
This proseminar addresses problems and methods related to the study of government; history; history of science, technology, and medicine; and allied disciplines. It stresses the critical analysis of sources, constructing explanatory models, standards of logical demonstration, and organizing and presenting research results. Emphasis is on developing both writing and research skills. In the fall, section 1 focuses on the research and writing skills necessary for advanced work in historical, political, and social studies, section 2 examines historical and contemporary relationships among gender, schooling, and development in comparative perspective, and section 3 considers the history and legacy of the 1960s. In the spring, section 1 focuses on the evolution of conflict processes and addresses the scientific study of inter- and intranational relations and section 3 focuses on modern France. Students study essential categories of analysis used in history, political science, and anthropology. Prerequisites: satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills. In addition, at the first class meeting, students must complete a writing assignment that demonstrates their graduate-level reading comprehension and ability to write coherent, logical arguments.

EDUC E-210 Graduate Research Methods and Scholarly Writing in Educational Technologies (G)
Harvard Extension School
This proseminar guides students through the process of qualitative research design, which culminates in writing a detailed thesis or capstone project proposal. Students learn how to define a theoretical context for their research on technologies of education; formulate researchable questions or project topics; select a research or project site; and pick sampling, data collection, and analysis techniques. Students critically examine validity threats and alternative explanations to their research. Prerequisites: successful completion of five Graduate Program in Educational Technologies (retired program) courses and a satisfactory score on the mandatory test of critical reading and writing skills.

21A.819J: Qualitative Research Methods (G)
MIT – Anthropology
Training in the design and practice of qualitative research. Organized around illustrative texts, class exercises, and student projects. Topics include the process of gaining access to and participating in the social worlds of others; techniques of observation, fieldnote-taking, researcher self-monitoring and reflection; methods of inductive analysis of qualitative data including conceptual coding, grounded theory, and narrative analysis. Discussion of research ethics, the politics of fieldwork, modes of validating researcher accounts, and styles of writing up qualitative field research. 

Ethnography


Anthropology 1610: Ethnographic Research Methods (U)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences – Anthropology
Introduction to methodology for contemporary ethnographic field research in anthropology. Students complete assigned and independent research projects relying on a variety of ethnographic methods, under supervision of department faculty.

Anthropology 1836aar. Sensory Ethnography I (G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences – Anthropology
First half of a year-long sequence in which students apply media anthropological theory and conduct ethnography using film, video, sound, and/or still photography.
Note: Limited to graduate students, who must also attend all VES 158 classes. Emphasis is on pre-production and production in the spring, and on post-production in the fall. Interview with instructor and teaching assistant required for admission.

Anthropology 1850. Ethnography as Practice and Genre (U, G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences - Anthropology
For sociocultural anthropologists, ethnography is both a way of studying human communities and a way of writing about them. Ethnographic fieldwork raises issues of participation, power, and perspective; cultural relativism; the nature of evidence; and the ethics of engagement. Writing ethnography highlights other issues, such as the politics of representing “others.” This course explores these and related issues through close reading and intensive discussion of selected texts. Note: This course fulfills the undergraduate "Methods" requirement for Social Anthropology.

Anthropology 2722: Sonic Ethnography (G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences – Anthropology
This is a practice-based course in which students record, edit, and produce anthropologically informed audio works which interpret culture and lived experience. Listening sessions will provide a broad context of contemporary work using location recordings, and readings will situate the practice within the growing field of sound studies. In their projects, students will experiment with technical and conceptual strategies of recording and composition as they engage with questions of ethnographic representation through the sensory dimension of sound.
Note: Experience in media production helpful but not required. Course will also include additional weekly two-hour listening session, and occasional required technique/technology workshops, to be scheduled.

Anthropology 2835r. Sensory Ethnography I (G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences - Anthropology
First half of a year-long sequence in which students apply media anthropological theory and conduct ethnography using film, video, sound, and/or still photography.

Anthropology 2836r. Sensory Ethnography II: Studio Course (G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences - Anthropology
Second half of a year-long sequence in which students apply media anthropological theory and conduct ethnography using film, video, sound, still photography, and/or hypermedia. Note: Limited to graduate students, who must also attend all VES 158 classes. Emphasis is on pre-production and production in the spring, and on post-production in the fall. Interview with instructor and teaching assistant required for admission.

Sociology 150: Neighborhood Effects and the Social Order of the City (U)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences – Sociology
Ideas about order and disorder have driven debates about the city for over a century. After reviewing classic approaches we will examine contemporary urban research on neighborhood inequality, "broken-windows" and crime, racial segregation, the challenges of ethnic diversity and immigration, neighborhood social networks, the symbolic meanings of disorder, and competing visions for the uses of public space. Students will conduct field-based observations drawing upon cutting-edge methods employed by urban sociologists to understand the workings of the modern city.

Folklore and Mythology 97: Fieldwork and Ethnography in Folklore (U)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences – Folklore & Mythology
Introduces concentrators to the study of traditions - their performance, collection, representation and interpretation. Both ethnographic and theoretical readings serve as the material for class discussion and the foundation for experimental fieldwork projects.
Note: Required of all, and limited to, concentrators.

S505: Participant Observation in Qualitative Research (G)
Harvard Graduate School of Education
This course, which was formerly a module numbered S-710B, is a workshop in observing and analyzing educational settings. It is a learning-by-doing workshop course, using a shared, easily accessible research site. Our goal is to assemble a toolkit of methodological strategies for observation-based research. Our aims are as follows: (1) to develop a beginning understanding of the key theoretical, analytic, methodological, and practical issues central to doing participant observation, especially in familiar settings; (2) to improve our ability to observe, document, and systematically analyze people's routine practices in natural life, particularly in complex educational settings; and (3) to consider some early dilemmas of authority, validity, and ethics in the representation of "others" and selves. Students will be asked to read and comment regularly on each other's field notes and analytic memos.
Note: Permission of instructor required. Enrollment is limited; Ed.D. students given preference. Students who have taken S-710B should not take this course.

S-710B Observation and Participation in Qualitative Research (G)
Harvard Graduate School of Education
This module is a workshop in observing and analyzing educational settings. This is a learning-by-doing workshop course, using a shared, easily accessible research site. Our goal is to assemble a toolkit of methodological strategies for observation-based research. Our aims are as follows: (1) to develop a beginning understanding of the key theoretical, analytic, methodological, and practical issues central to doing participant observation, especially in familiar settings; (2) to improve our ability to observe, document, and systematically analyze people's routine practices in natural life, particularly in complex educational settings; and (3) to consider some early dilemmas of authority, validity, and ethics in the representation of "others" and selves. Students will be asked to read and comment regularly on each other's field notes and analytic memos. Permission of the instructor is required. Doctoral students will be given priority in enrollment.

21A.01: How Culture Works (U)
MIT – Anthropology
Introduces diverse meanings and uses of the concept of culture with historical and contemporary examples from scholarship and popular media around the globe. Includes first-hand observations, synthesized histories and ethnographies, quantitative representations, and visual and fictionalized accounts of human experiences. Students conduct empirical research on cultural differences through the systematic observation of human interaction, employ methods of interpretative analysis, and practice convincing others of the accuracy of their findings. Enrollment limited. 

21A.802: Seminar in Ethnography and Fieldwork (U)
MIT – Anthropology
Introduction to ethnographic practices: the study of and communicating about culture. Subject provides instruction and practice in writing, revision of fieldnotes, and a final paper. Preference to Anthropology majors and minors. 

21A.829J: Ethnography (G)
MIT – Anthropology
Practicum-style course in anthropological methods of ethnographic fieldwork and writing. Depending on student experience in ethnographic reading and practice, subject combines reading ethnographies in anthropological and science studies with formulating and pursuing ethnographic work in local labs, companies, or other sites.
Note: Preference to HASTS, CMS, HTC and Sloan graduate students. 

See also SUP-913 Research Design and Research Methods for Fieldwork above (General Methods)

Historical Methods


History of Science 150. History of the Human Sciences (G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences - History of Science
Examination of the growth and development of social sciences such as sociology, anthropology, psychoanalysis, psychology, political science, and economics from the Enlightenment to the present. Innovators devised these fields to provide new, scientific ways to gain insight into age-old philosophical and religious questions, such as, What is the nature of the "self" or the "soul"? What binds human beings to one another? What is free will? What are the limits of social control, behavioral engineering, and the possible reach of techniques for adjustment and manipulation?

History of Science 247. Current Issues in the History of Medicine: Seminar (G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences - History of Science
Explores new methods for understanding disease, medicine, and society, ranging from historical demography to cultural studies. Topics include patterns of health and disease, changes in medical science and clinical practice, the doctor-patient relationship, health care systems, alternative healing, and representations of the human body. The course will focus on historical problem-framing, research strategies, and writing.

East Asian Studies 205 - Approaches to the Comparative History of Medicine and the Body (G)
Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences – East Asian Studies
Research seminar devoted to the theory and methods, possibilities and challenges of cross-cultural studies in the history of medicine and the body. Students will also be expected to attend lectures for Culture and Belief 11.

HBS 4810: Business History Seminar (G)
Harvard Business School
The Business History Seminar explores the history of firms, industries, business systems, and entrepreneurs from a global and comparative perspective. We will discuss the different trajectories and interpretations of firm growth, industry development, and entrepreneurial activity from the 19th century to the present. We will also analyze the integration of firms into the social, technological, cultural, and political contexts of the time. Among the topics covered are the changing organizational structure of firms, the emergence of modern management, the rise of big business, the impact of government policies and legal frameworks on business, the transformation of industries, and the role of entrepreneurship in capitalist economies. In each meeting we will discuss the key literature by prominent authors in the field. The course will familiarize students with some of the classic studies in these areas, but also introduce recent research and publications. The course provides an innovative framework for understanding the emergence of business institutions, structures, and practices embedded in specific historical and geographical contexts. It is relevant for graduate students working in a range of fields including History, Economic History, and Business Administration. The overall aim of the course is to introduce graduate students to central issues and theoretical approaches in the history of business and of capitalism and to explore the relevance of this literature to other disciplines. The course provides a unique opportunity to develop analytical research skills through designing, researching, and writing a paper using original sources, either quantitative or qualitative. Students are strongly encouraged to choose a topic relevant to their own research interests or dissertation project and will have the opportunity to work closely with the instructor during the semester on the paper. Cross-registrants are welcome.

21H.009 The World: 1400 – Present (U)
MIT – History
Surveys the increasing interaction between communities, as the barrier of distance succumbed to both curiosity and new transport technologies. Explores Western Europe and the United States’ rise to world dominance, as well as the great divergence in material, political, and technological development between Western Europe and East Asia post-1750, and its impact on the rest of the world. Examines a series of evolving relationships, including human beings and their physical environment; religious and political systems; and sub-groups within communities, sorted by race, class, and gender. Introduces historical and other interpretive methodologies using both primary and secondary source materials. 

 

Interviewing


S-710C Interviewing in Qualitative Research (G)
Harvard Graduate School of Education
The aim of this module is to provide interested students with the knowledge, skill, and theoretical grounding necessary to carry out reliable, trustworthy, and respected informal interviews in context. This module exposes students to the complexity of the informal interview as a qualitative method of data collection and helps them assess both the benefits and the limitations of this important research strategy. Students will construct and conduct interviews around a researchable question, start to analyze the interview data, and begin to interpret the data in narrative form. Throughout this process, we will be critical of the power dynamics involving the imbalance between researcher and participants. Students are expected to engage in weekly projects, participate in class discussions, write memos, and complete a final assignment. Permission of the instructor is required.



Action Research

S-547 Action Research (G)
Harvard Graduate School of Education
Action research, unlike traditional research, places action at the center of research; its primary goal is to solve a problem that will lead to improvement in individual or organizational practice. Action research prioritizes “insider” status rather than assuming an outside, “detached” stance. Practitioners have used action research to answer questions about their community organizations, schools, and classrooms. In this course students will do an action research project, in addition to critically reflecting on the intellectual and practical questions that action research raises. This seminar will meet every other week for the full academic year. In order to enroll in the class students must have a site in which they can conduct an action research project, and have prior research training. Permission of the instructor is required.

SHDH501-01 Community-Based Participatory Action Research (G)
Harvard School of Public Health
The course is designed to provide an introduction to the area of Community-based Participatory Action Research (CBPAR). CBPAR and related methods have been receiving growing attention in the field of public health. CBPAR is defined as a collaborative approach to research that equitably involves all partners in the research process and recognizes the unique strengths that each brings. It begins with a research issue of importance to the community with the aim of combining knowledge and action for social change to improve community health and eliminate health disparities. (Minkler & Wallerstein, 2003, p.4). This 2.5 credit seminar will provide participatory action research, the advantages and limitations to using this approach, and some of the skills necessary for participating effectively in CBPAR. Offered in the second module of Spring 2012.

Portraiture


A-162 The Art and Science of Portraiture (G)
Harvard Graduate School of Education
This seminar will investigate the methods, form, and purposes of social science portraiture: its relationship to other qualitative research strategies and its links to literature and art. Seminar members will respond critically to examples of portraiture in field studies, ethnographies, biographies, letters, diaries, and literature, as well as write their own portraits of individuals, institutions, relationships, processes, or concepts. Attention will be paid to systematic description, careful analysis, composition, and writing and to the aesthetics and science of creating portraits. This will be a working seminar with members acting as discussion leaders, critics, and respondents of each other’s work. In addition to composing a portrait, students will be required to write short, critical analyses and give collaborative oral presentations. Enrollment is limited to 15; permission of the instructor is required.

 

Discourse Analysis

S522: Analyzing Culture: Dialogue, Discourse, and Theme (G)
Harvard Graduate School of Education
Educational research must take account of the cultural and social context in which the individual develops, and with which effective educational practice must interact. This course introduces qualitative methods for analyzing how meaning is managed, and how we make sense of experience through dialogue and interpretation within a cultural context. How do people represent their concepts or beliefs in their talk (or other text)? How are meaning and identity negotiated dialogically through language and symbol? How is culturally shared meaning revealed, negotiated, and reproduced in discursive practices? What assumptions do we make within each of these questions? The course will introduce students to the main epistemological debates around the analysis of textual material. We will use naturalistic and interview-based material and literary sources (including film) to explore a range of methods. The course will provide a grounding in methods for the interpretation of material ranging from deriving a thematic profile of personal beliefs to more discursive questions about how we manage multiple, multilayered, and even contradictory discourses in talk, in identity, in decision-making, and in education, and how these are embedded in cultural and historical contexts. The course will comprise weekly three-hour sessions that include lectures and class work. For assignments, students will work on analyzing appropriate material. Texts or data may derive from any approved source and in any approved format, or from students' own research. The second half of the course will include a group activity looking in depth at data.

T390B: Research Practicum in Adult Group-Learning Conversations (G)
Harvard Graduate School of Education
This practicum offers graduate students the opportunity to experience and participate in Project Zero's Learning Innovations Laboratory (LILA), an ongoing research project at HGSE (see http://lila.pz.harvard.edu). LILA creates and supports a collaborative learning community of 25 leaders from organizations worldwide and faculty from various schools across Harvard. Leaders from public, private, and nonprofit organizations gather at HGSE for regular meetings to share practices and explore challenges related to human development and change in the workplace. The LILA research staff facilitates and documents the collective inquiry process. Students will develop research skills in conversational analysis of adult-group learning discussions at LILA. Over the semester, students will read literature on the methods of conversational analysis; code and analyze transcripts and video/audio recordings of small-group interactions; code and analyze the learning outcomes of these small-group conversations via survey data collected from discussion participants; analyze the relationship between qualitative interaction patterns and learning outcomes; and write regular research memos on emerging themes. Students will also engage in synthesizing selected literature pertaining to topics at LILA. Students will have access to LILA's library of research briefings, book reviews, and articles, as well as the opportunity to take part in regular conferences with leaders and various Harvard faculty. Students can expect to develop and sharpen practical research skills as well as learn the latest in emerging research and practices pertaining to creativity and innovation in organizations.
Note: Permission of instructor required. Enrollment is limited to 6. Graduate students from other programs and schools are welcome to apply. Enrollment procedure will be posted on the course web site.