Politics

Spatial Cognition in Political Reasoning

Faculty Member: Ryan Enos

Using a map based interface, we collect data on the awareness of citizens about the spatial location of groups. This tests the importance of spatial cognition in political reasoning.

This position is part of the Undergraduate Research Scholars Program (URS) in the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University.

State Legislative Responses to Demographic Change

The project is a longitudinal study of state legislative responses to demographic change. In particular we are interested in the relationship between growth in a state's minority population and efforts to restrict voting rights. Our empirical scope includes legislative efforts in every U.S. state, from 2000-2012 .  The scholar is responsible for collecting and coding data on state legislative activity regarding voting rights.  We are trying to determine to what extent state efforts to restrict voting rights--e.g.

The Emergence of Party Discipline in the British House of Commons

This project comprises the compilation of the most extensive database of British legislative records ever built.  We have already acquired every speech made in the British House of Commons after 1803, and are soon to acquire every roll call undertaken between 1832 and 1900.  Our research focuses on when and how party discipline emerged in the British House of Commons.  Primary responsibility of the student is  to 'clean up' of roll call records, which list member of parliament …

State Responses to Immigration Regulation

Why do states vary in their approaches towards the regulation of immigration?  In this research project, we will map and explain cross-national variation in the way receiving states attempt to regulate immigration flows in contemporary times. Using statistical and qualitative case analysis, we plant to consider a range of explanatory factors including (a) interest groups; (b) partisan politics; (c) market factors and (d) legal and political institutions.