Presentations

Drew Dimmery presents "Permutation Weighting", at CGIS Knafel Building (K354) - 12-1:30 pm, Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Abstract: This work introduces permutation weighting: a weighting estimator for observational causal inference under general treatment regimes which preserves arbitrary measures of covariate balance. We show that estimating weights which obey balance constraints is equivalent to a simple two-class classification problem between the observed data and a permuted dataset (no matter the cardinality of treatment). Arbitrary probabilistic classifiers may be used in this method; the hypothesis space of the classifier corresponds to the nature...

Read more about Drew Dimmery presents "Permutation Weighting"
Johann Gagnon-Bartsch presents "The Duality of Negative Controls and Replicates", at CGIS Knafel Building (K354) - 12-1:30 pm, Wednesday, December 5, 2018
Abstract: Negative controls can be used to adjust for unobserved confounders in an observational study.  A negative control is a variable that is known a priori to be (1) unaffected by treatment, and (2) affected by the unobserved confounders.  Any observed variation in a negative control may be attributed to the confounders, but not to treatment.  Thus, negative controls can be used to partially identify the unobserved confounders.  A similar situation arises when a single observational unit is observed multiple...
Read more about Johann Gagnon-Bartsch presents "The Duality of Negative Controls and Replicates"
Tracy Ke presents "Statistical Analysis of Large Social Networks", at CGIS Knafel Building (K354) - 12-1:30 pm, Wednesday, November 28, 2018

Abstract: Severe degree heterogeneity is a universal phenomenon in large social networks. However, the degree parameters are largely nuisance to our major interest, and their effects can be carefully removed with proper statistical strategies. In the first part of the talk, I will take the mixed-membership estimation as an example and present several useful ideas for dealing with degree heterogeneity.   We assume the network has K perceivable communities. Each node is associated with a K-dimensional “membership” vector whose...

Read more about Tracy Ke presents "Statistical Analysis of Large Social Networks"
Matthew Blackwell presents "Telescope Matching: A Flexible Approach to Estimating Direct Effects" , at CGIS Knafel Building (K354) - 12-1:30 pm, Wednesday, November 14, 2018
Abstract: Estimating the direct effect of a treatment fixing the value of a consequence of that treatment is becoming a common part of social science research. In many cases, however, these effects are difficult to estimate standard methods since they can induce post-treatment bias. More complicated methods like marginal structural models or structural nested mean models can recover direct effects in these situations but require parametric models for the outcome or the post-treatment covariates. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach, which we call telescope... Read more about Matthew Blackwell presents "Telescope Matching: A Flexible Approach to Estimating Direct Effects"
Zhichao Jiang presents "Causal Inference with Interference and Noncompliance in Two-Stage Randomized Experiments" , at CGIS Knafel Building (K354) - 12-1:30 pm, Wednesday, November 7, 2018

Abstract: In many social science experiments, subjects often interact with each other and as a result one unit's treatment influences the outcome of another unit. Over the last decade, a significant progress has been made towards causal inference in the presence of such interference between units. However, much of the literature has assumed perfect compliance with treatment assignment. In this paper, we establish the nonparametric identification of the complier average direct and spillover effects in two-stage randomized experiments with interference and noncompliance....

Read more about Zhichao Jiang presents "Causal Inference with Interference and Noncompliance in Two-Stage Randomized Experiments"
Edward Kao and Steven Smith present "Network Causal Inference on Social Media Influence Operations", at CGIS Knafel Building (K354) - 12-1:30 pm, Wednesday, October 31, 2018:

Abstract: Estimating influence on social media networks is an important practical and theoretical problem, especially because this new medium is widely exploited as a platform for disinformation and propaganda. This paper introduces a novel approach to influence estimation on social media networks and applies it to the real-world problem of characterizing active influence operations on Twitter during the 2017 French presidential elections. The new influence estimation approach attributes impact by accounting for narrative...

Read more about Edward Kao and Steven Smith present "Network Causal Inference on Social Media Influence Operations"
Tyler J. VanderWeele presents "On the Promotion of Human Flourishing, with Methodological Reflections" Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Abstract: Many empirical studies throughout the social and biomedical sciences focus only on very narrow outcomes such as income, or a single specific disease state, or a measure of positive affect. Human well-being or flourishing, however, consists in a much broader range of states and outcomes, certainly including mental and physical health, but also encompassing happiness and life satisfaction, meaning and purpose, character and virtue, and close social relationships. The empirical literature from longitudinal, experimental, and quasiexperimental studies is reviewed...

Read more about Tyler J. VanderWeele presents "On the Promotion of Human Flourishing, with Methodological Reflections"
10/17 - Susan Murphy presents "Stratified Micro-Randomized Trials with Applications to Mobile Health", at CGIS Knafel Building (K354) - 12-1:30 pm, Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Abstract: Technological advancements in the field of mobile devices and wearable sensors make it possible to deliver treatments anytime and anywhere to users like you and me. Increasingly the delivery of these treatments is triggered by detections/predictions of vulnerability and receptivity. These observations are likely to have been impacted by prior treatments. Furthermore the treatments are often designed to have an impact on users over a span of time during which subsequent treatments may be provided. Here we discuss our work on the design of a mobile health smoking...

Read more about 10/17 - Susan Murphy presents "Stratified Micro-Randomized Trials with Applications to Mobile Health"
10/3 - Naoki Egami presents "Causal Diffusion Analysis with Stationarity: How Hate Crimes Diffuse across Space", at CGIS Knafel Building (K354) - 12-1:30 pm, Wednesday, October 3, 2018
Abstract: Although social scientists have long been interested in the process through which ideas and behavior diffuse, the identification of causal diffusion effects, also known as peer effects, remains challenging. Many scholars consider the commonly used assumption of no omitted confounders to be untenable due to contextual confounding and homophily bias. To address this long-standing identification problem, I introduce a class of stationary causal directed acyclic graphs (DAGs), which represent the time-invariant...
Read more about 10/3 - Naoki Egami presents "Causal Diffusion Analysis with Stationarity: How Hate Crimes Diffuse across Space"

Pages