News

    What can (or should) activists learn from the tea party?

    What can (or should) activists learn from the tea party?

    May 11, 2017
    Washington Post | By Vanessa Williamson and Theda Skocpol. Vanessa Williamson (PhD '15) is a fellow in governance studies at the Brookings Institution and author of the new book Read My Lips: Why Americans Are Proud to Pay Taxes (Princeton University Press, 2017). Theda Skocpol is the Victor S. Thomas professor of government and sociology at Harvard University and director of the Scholars Strategy Network.
    Is the Trump Presidency Getting More Normal? Experts Rate 28 Events

    Is the Trump Presidency Getting More Normal? Experts Rate 28 Events

    May 3, 2017
    The New York Times | Providing perspective: Harvard's Jennifer Hochschild, Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government and Professor of African and African American Studies; and alumna Vesla Weaver (PhD '07), Professor of Political Science at Yale University.
    Portals via CityLab

    The 'Portals' Encouraging Real Conversations About Policing and Race

    May 8, 2017
    The Atlantic—CityLab | Two Yale professors—Inequality & Social Policy alum Vesla Weaver (PhD '07) and Tracey Meares of Yale Law School—are using immersive technology to enable connections between communities of color in low-income neighborhoods across four U.S. cities. In summer 2017, Weaver joins the faculty of Johns Hopkins University as Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of Political Science and Sociology.
    Peter A. Hall

    Hall shares thoughts on EU's future

    April 6, 2017
    Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs | Peter A. Hall, Krupp Foundation Professor of European Studies at  Harvard, gave a keynote address on "A Continent Redvided? European Integration in Turbulent Times," as part of the University of Wisconsin-Madison's spring symposium on "Europe in Crisis: The Future of the EU and Trans-Atlantic Relations." View the full program:
    La Follette Spring Symposium
    Research: Lawyering and Lobbying: Why Banks Shape Rules

    Research: Lawyering and Lobbying: Why Banks Shape Rules

    March 3, 2017
    Stigler Center at Chicago Booth | Brian Libgober, PhD candidate in Government, and Daniel Carpenter, Allie S. Freed Professor of Government and Director of Social Sciences at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, presented their research, Lawyering and Lobbying: Why Banks Shape Rules, at a jointly organized  conference hosted by the Stigler Center. The conference, How Incomplete is the Theory of the Firm?,  was jointly organized by Luigi Zingales of the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, David Moss and Rebecca Henderson of Harvard Business School, and Karthik Ramanna of Oxford University.
    Trump's presidency is teaching elites like me a lesson

    Trump's presidency is teaching elites like me a lesson

    April 26, 2017
    Washington Post | By Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor and a political theorist at Harvard. "One of the key questions for any effort to rebuild our capacity to collaborate is whether members of the professional elite can recover a commitment to the people as a whole, and not merely to those who live near them — near us, I should say — in urban enclaves," Allen writes.… Read more about Trump's presidency is teaching elites like me a lesson
    Emily Sneff and Danielle Allen - The New York Times

    A New Parchment Declaration of Independence Surfaces. Head-Scratching Ensues.

    April 21, 2017
    The New York Times | A remarkable discoverty by Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard. "Its subtle details, the scholars argue, illuminate an enduring puzzle at the heart of American politics: Was the country founded by a unitary national people, or by a collection of states? 'That is really the key riddle of the American system,' said Danielle Allen, a professor of government at Harvard, who discovered the document with a colleague, Emily Sneff."
    Declaration of Independence

    Thanks to this agency, we identified an unknown copy of the Declaration of Independence

    May 3, 2017
    Washington Post | By Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard. "In the middle of the 20th century, this research project would have consumed at least a lifetime, and possibly several. Without [these] digital resources...it is highly unlikely that a researcher would have been able to assemble the vast body of evidence necessary to make the identification that we have made."
    How tax rates influence the migration of superstar inventors

    How tax rates influence the migration of superstar inventors

    May 24, 2017
    Microeconomic Insights | By Ufak Akcigit (University of Chicago), Salome Baslandze (Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance), and Stefanie Stantcheva (Harvard University). The authors summarize the findings from their recent American Economic Review article, "Taxation and the International Mobility of Inventors." Stantcheva is Associate Professor of Economics (effective 7/1) at Harvard.
    View the research
    The Ambition-Marriage Trade-Off Too Many Single Women Face

    The Ambition-Marriage Trade-Off Too Many Single Women Face

    May 8, 2017
    Harvard Business Review | By Leonardo Bursztyn, Thomas Fujiwara, and Amanda Pallais. Harvard economist Amanda Pallais and co-authors discuss the findings of their latest research on marriage market incentives and labor market investments, forthcoming in the American Economic Review: "Many schooling and initial career decisions, such as whether to take advanced math in high school, major in engineering, or become an entrepreneur, occur early in life, when most women are single. These decisions can have labor market consequences with long-lasting effects," they write. 
    View the research
    Commencement banner 2017

    “The Value of Noticing”

    May 23, 2017

    Harvard Magazine | In her Baccalaureate address to graduating seniors, Harvard University President Drew Faust drew from Sendhil Mullainathan's recent column in The New York Times on the cognitive biases that shape our responses to problems of ineqauality and opportunity:

     

    As one of your economics professors, Sendhil Mullainathan, recently pointed out in a column in The New York Times, we remember the headwinds that blow against us and forget the tailwinds that help us along. Notice and be grateful for those tailwinds How often do we remind ourselves that to some degree we won a global lottery over which we had no control? “The most important things that happened to me here happened to me by accident,” one of you said. There is a responsibility that comes with recognizing that.

    Tunnel Vision

    Tunnel Vision

    March 20, 2017

    NPR The Hidden Brain | This week on Hidden Brain, the psychological phenomenon of scarcity and how it can affect our ability to see the big picture and cope with problems in our lives. Features Harvard economist Sendhil Mullainathan and Princeton psychologist Eldar Shafir, authors of Scarcity: Why Having So much Means So Little (Times Books, Henry Holt & Company, 2013). (Transcript + audio)

    See also Harvard Magazine's feature on Sendhil Mullainathan, "The Science of Scarcity: A behavioral economist's fresh perspectives on poverty" (May-June 2015).

    Headwinds and tailwinds

    To Help Tackle Inequality, Remember the Advantages You’ve Had

    April 28, 2017

    The New York Times | By Sendhil Mullainathan, Robert C. Waggoner Professor of Economics. 

    This cognitive bias, I think, sheds light on persistent disagreements over inequality and opportunity that affect many of us in American society.

    Young men falling to the bottom of the income ladder

    Young men falling to the bottom of the income ladder

    May 22, 2017
    Boston Globe | Quotes Lawrence Katz, Elisabeth Allison Professor of Economics: "People from elite colleges moving to Wall Street and top law firms and to tech companies are doing perfectly fine. In fact, they're doing much better than comparable people in their parents' generation," Katz said. "But for the typical young man, they're donig substantially worse economically than their father."
    Cracking the Mystery of Labor's Falling Share of GDP

    Cracking the Mystery of Labor's Falling Share of GDP

    April 24, 2017
    Bloomberg View | Cites a recent study by David Autor (MIT), David Dorn (University of Zurich), Lawrence Katz (Harvard), Christina Patterson (MIT), and John Van Reenen (MIT), "Concentrating on the Fall of the Labor Share," which appears in American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings (May 2017).  For a more detailed treatment, see "The Fall of the Labor Share and the Rise of Superstar Firms," released as an NBER Working Paper in May 2017.
    View AER paper
    View NBER paper

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