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Period power or wrong, period? The science of athletic performance across the menstrual cycle.

The toilets in the ramshackle, 1970s restrooms at my Midwestern middle school had blessedly long flushes. You could rummage in your bag for a pad, open the plastic wrapper, rip off the adhesive, pull the used pad from your underwear, and deposit it in the metal bin all before the water in the bowl had settled to a hush. No one would be the wiser. Over the summer, though, the school underwent renovation. The new toilets, powerful and efficient, finished their job the moment you depressed the handle. What was a prudish girl to do? The answer: take a friend, someone you trusted with...

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Harvard GenderSci Lab: open call for 2019-2020

The GenderSci Lab is currently inviting inquiries about joining the lab in 2019-2020. We seek motivated lab members with training at the intersection of the sciences and gender studies who bring diverse backgrounds and skills, and who seek to develop their skills further. Members can expect to contribute to peer-reviewed publications and engage in public outreach.

The GenderSci Lab is a collaborative, interdisciplinary research lab dedicated to generating feminist concepts, methods, and theories for scientific research on sex and gender. Through research, teaching, and public...

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Sex/Gender and the Biosocial Turn

multi-colored brain

From epigenetics to microbiomics, biosocial research is emerging as a leading-edge science in our postgenomic moment. New findings, research methods, and funding streams focusing on how social inequalities and environmental factors interplay with bodies, biologies, and health outcomes are expanding daily....

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A Q&A with Daphna Joel on her new article, "Analysis of Human Brain Structure Reveals that the Brain 'Types' Typical of Males Are Also Typical of Females, and Vice Versa”

Brain sex-difference research usually focuses on average differences between men and women. Neuroscientist Daphna Joel challenges this approach by asking, “Wait! What exactly do you mean by ‘difference’?” In her 2015 paper, Joel queried whether individual brains of men and women are consistently “male” or “female” at the level of individual features. She found that they were not, giving rise to the hypothesis that most people are “mosaics...

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