Our Authors

 

Allan Brandt (Editor and Course Instructor)

brandt@fas.harvard.edu

Allan Brandt photo
Allan M. Brandt is the Amalie Moses Kass Professor of the History of Medicine and Professor of the History of Science.  He holds a joint appointment between the Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Harvard Medical School. His work focuses on social and ethical aspects of health, disease, medical practices, and global health in the twentieth century. Brandt is the author of No Magic Bullet:  A  Social History of Venereal Disease in the United States since 1880 (1987); and co-editor of Morality and Health (1997).  He has written on the social history of epidemic disease; the history of public health and health policy; and the history of human experimentation among other topics. His book on the social and cultural history of cigarette smoking in the U.S., The Cigarette Century: The Rise, Fall, and Deadly Persistence of the Product that Defined America, was published by Basic Books in 2007 (paperback, 2009). The book received the Bancroft Prize from Columbia University in 2008 and the Welch Medal from the American Association for the History of Medicine in 2011. Brandt has been elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is currently writing about the impact stigma has on patients and health outcomes.

Alyssa Botelho (Editor and Course Teaching Assistant)

alyssa_botelho@g.harvard.edu

Alyssa Botelho photo Alyssa Botelho is a MD-PhD student at Harvard Medical School and the Department of History of Science at Harvard University. Her work focuses on questions of equity in health and medicine. Her dissertation examines the history of health disparities in the rural United States, with a focus on how efforts to build and sustain rural hospitals over the twentieth century figured into movements for racial equality, economic justice, and indigenous sovereignty in rural communities. Her previous research was on the history of the radical science movement Science for the People, and their activist and intellectual interventions on issues in biology and medicine.

 

Mitch Bacci

Mitch Bacci

Mitch Bacci studies the history of narcotics and public health in the nineteenth and twentieth century Eastern Mediterranean at Harvard’s joint PhD program in History and Middle Eastern Studies.

 

Andrew Binet

Andrew Binet

Andrew Binet is a PhD student in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT, where his research focuses on community health and the social organization of care in North American contexts.

 

Emma Broder

Emma Broder Emma Broder is a PhD student in the department of History of Science at Harvard University, where she studies the intersection of gender, lived experience, medical knowledge, and biotechnology.

 

John Giardina

John Giardina John Giardina is a graduate student in the Decision Sciences track of the Harvard PhD Program in Health Policy. His research interests include the measurement of patient preferences and the use of shared-decision making principles to help patients and their physicians make optimal health decisions.

 

A Jay Holmgren

A Jay Holmgren

A Jay Holmgren is a PhD student in Health Policy Management at Harvard University and Harvard Business School, where he studies the use of information technology in health care.

 

Sam Keaser

Sam Keaser

Sam Keaser is a Master of Theological Studies student at Harvard Divinity School. He studies 20th century evangelical politics, evangelical deconversion narratives, and social theories of religion.

 

Eana Meng

Eana Meng Eana Meng is recent graduate of Harvard College, where she majored in History of Science. She studies the history of alternative medicines, with a focus on traditional Chinese medicine.

 

Udodiri Okwandu

Udodiri Okwandu

Udodiri Okwandu is a PhD candidate in the Department of History and Science at Harvard University, where she studies the intersection of race, medicine, and science. She has primarily focused on the medicalization of social deviance.

 

Christopher Rudeen

Christopher Rudeen

Christopher Rudeen is a doctoral student in the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University, where he studies the history of medicine and psychiatry and the ways in which nontraditional items and practices are used for healing and defining what is “normal.”

 

Joshua Rushakoff

Joshua Rushakoff Joshua Rushakoff, MD, MPP is a resident physician in internal medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Lose Angeles. He received his MD from the University of California-San Francisco and his Masters of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.  Previously, Rushakoff served as the Clausen Fellow for Microclinic International implementing a CDC Community Transformation Grant in Appalachian Kentucky.  Most recently, he has worked with the Office of Population Health at UCSF on restructuring chronic pain care, researchers at UC Berkeley exploring anti-trust implications of Accountable Care Organization implementation; and Insure the Uninsured Project on California health care cost containment.  

 

Kailash Sundaram

Kailash Sundaram

Kailash Sundaram is a recent graduate of Harvard College, where he majored in Social Studies and wrote a thesis on the effectiveness of public-private partnerships.

 

Siva Sundaram

Siva Sundaram Siva Sundaram, MD is a resident physician in psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco and a graduate of Harvard Medical School. 

 

Katherine Warren

Katherine Warren Katherine Warren is an MD-PhD student at Harvard University, where she studies the anthropology of public health and medicine in the United States.

 

Margaret Wilson

Margaret Wilson

Margaret Wilson is a recent graduate of Harvard College, where she majored in History and Science with a Secondary Field in Global Health and Health Policy.

 

Che Yeun

Che Yeun Che Yeun is interested in the human body as an object of industry. She is especially interested in sensation, physiology, and product design. Through these projects, Che investigates the global and colonial implications of knowing the human body through medicine and technology. These questions also fuel her work as a fiction writer. She is from Seoul, Korea.