The Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging Library is a collection of books, films, and other resources selected by the Harvard Kennedy School Office of Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging (ODIB) and Library & Knowledge Services (LKS). We hope this collection will foster communication and discussion on diversity, inclusion, and belonging at HKS. Help us grow this collection by recommending books and films that resonate with you.

Please submit suggestions through this webform, either anonymously or with your name and contact information if you'd like to be notified when we add the item to the collection. You can find all items in print format through HOLLIS.

Featured Titles

Daughters of the Dust
Dash, Julie. Daughters of the Dust. Kino Video, 2000. View the FilmAbstract
Daughters of the Dust is a 1991 independent film written, directed and produced by Julie Dash and is the first feature film directed by an African-American woman distributed theatrically in the United States. Set in 1902, it tells the story of three generations of Gullah (also known as Geechee) women in the Peazant family on Saint Helena Island as they prepare to migrate to the North on the mainland.
Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture
Morales, Ed. Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture. London ; Brooklyn, N.Y. Verso, 2018. View the BookAbstract
The Latinx revolution in US culture, society, and politics. Latinx is the gender-neutral term that covers the largest racial minority in the United States, 17 percent of the country. In this groundbreaking discussion, Ed Morales explains how Latin political identities are tied to a long Latin American history of mestizaje, translatable as "mixedness" or "hybridity", and that this border thinking is both a key to understanding bilingual, bicultural Latin cultures and politics and a challenge to America's infamously black/white racial regime..
The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America
Muhammad, Khalil Gibran. The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America. Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 2010. View the BookAbstract
The Idea of Black Criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America. Khalil Gibran Muhammad chronicles how, when, and why modern notions of black people as an exceptionally dangerous race of criminals first emerged. Well known are the lynch mobs and racist criminal justice practices in the South that stoked white fears of black crime and shaped the contours of the New South. In this illuminating book, Muhammad shifts our attention to the urban North as a crucial but overlooked site for the production and dissemination of those ideas and practices. Following the 1890 census - the first to measure the generation of African Americans born after slavery - crime statistics, new migration and immigration trends, and symbolic references to America as the promised land were woven into a cautionary tale about the exceptional threat black people posed to modern urban society. Excessive arrest rates and overrepresentation in northern prisons were seen by many whites - liberals and conservatives, northerners and southerners - as indisputable proof of blacks' inferiority. What else but pathology could explain black failure in the land of opportunity? Social scientists and reformers used crime statistics to mask and excuse anti-black racism, violence, and discrimination across the nation, especially in the urban North. The Condemnation of Blackness is the most thorough historical account of the enduring link between blackness and criminality in the making of modern urban America. It is a startling examination of why the echoes of America's Jim Crow past continue to resonate in 'color-blind' crime rhetoric today.
This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color
Moraga, Cherríe, and Gloria Anzaldúa, ed. This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. Fourth edition. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2015. View the BookAbstract
Through personal essays, criticism, interviews, testimonials, poetry, and visual art, this collection expores, as coeditor Cherrie Moraga writes, 'the complex confluence of identities–race, class, gender, sexuality–systemic to women of color oppression and liberation."
What Is an American Muslim?: Embracing Faith and Citizenship
Naʻīm, ʻAbd Allāh Aḥmad. What Is an American Muslim?: Embracing Faith and Citizenship. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. View the BookAbstract
This title offers a pioneering exploration of American Muslim citizenship and identity, arguing against the prevalent emphasis on majority-minority politics and instead promoting a shared citizenship that both accommodates and transcends religious identity.
What Works: Gender Equality by Design
Bohnet, Iris. What Works: Gender Equality by Design. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016. View the BookAbstract
Gender equality is a moral and a business imperative. But unconscious bias holds us back and de-biasing minds has proven to be difficult and expensive. Behavioral design offers a new solution. Iris Bohnet shows that by de-biasing organizations instead of individuals, we can make smart changes that have big impacts--often at low cost and high speed.
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