Publications

    Black Panther
    Coogler, Ryan. Black Panther. Buena Vista Home Entertainment, 2018. View the FilmAbstract
    King T'Challa returns home to the isolated, technologically advanced African nation of Wakanda to serve as new leader. However, T'Challa soon finds that he is challenged for the throne from divisions within his own country. When two enemies conspire to destroy Wakanda, the hero known as Black Panther must join forces with C.I.A. agent Everett K. Ross and members of the Wakandan Special Forces, to prevent Wakanda from being drawn into a world war.
    Southern Comfort
    Davis, Kate. Southern Comfort. Docurama, 2003. View the FilmAbstract
    Southern Comfort is a 2001 documentary film about the final year in the life of Robert Eads, a transgender man. Eads, diagnosed with ovarian cancer, was turned down for treatment by a dozen doctors out of fear that treating such a patient would hurt their reputations. By the time Eads received treatment, the cancer was too advanced to save his life.
    Pariah
    Rees, Dee. Pariah. Universal City, CA: Universal Studios Home Entertainment, 2012. View the FilmAbstract
    Alike is a 17-year-old African-American woman who lives with her parents and younger sister in Brooklyn's Fort Greene neighborhood. She has a flair for poetry, and is a good student at her local high school. Alike is quietly but firmly embracing her identity as a lesbian. Wondering how much she can confide in her family, Alike strives to get through adolescence with grace, humor, and tenacity–sometimes succeeding, sometimes not, but always moving forward.
    Ethnic Notions
    Riggs, Marlon T. Ethnic Notions. California Newsreel, 1987. View the Film-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    Ethnic Notions is a 1987 documentary film directed by Marlon Riggs. It examines anti-Black stereotypes that permeated popular culture from the ante-bellum period until the advent of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.
    Race: The Power of an Illusion
    Adelman, Larry. Race: The Power of an Illusion. California Newsreel, 2003. View the Film-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    Race: The Power of an Illusion is a three-part documentary series produced by California Newsreel that investigates the idea of race in society, science and history. The educational documentary originally screened on American public television and was primarily funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Ford Foundation and PBS.
    Assata: An Autobiography
    Shakur, Assata, and Angela Davis. Assata: An Autobiography. Chicago: Lawrence Hill Books, 2001. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    Longtime activist, author and political figure Angela Davis brings us this expose of the women's movement in the context of the fight for civil rights and working class issues. She uncovers a side of the fight for suffrage many of us have not heard: the intimate tie between the anti-slavery campaign and the struggle for women's suffrage. She shows how the racist and classist bias of some in the women's movement have divided its own membership.
    Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity
    Serano, Julia. Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity. Second edition. Emeryville, CA: Seal Press, 2007. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    In the updated second edition of Whipping Girl, Julia Serano, a transsexual woman whose supremely intelligent writing reflects her diverse background as a lesbian transgender activist and professional biologist, shares her powerful experiences and observations—both pre- and post-transition—to reveal the ways in which fear, suspicion, and dismissiveness toward femininity shape our societal attitudes toward trans women, as well as gender and sexuality as a whole.
    Mean Little Deaf Queer: A Memoir
    Galloway, Terry. Mean Little Deaf Queer: A Memoir. Boston: Beacon Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    In 1959, the year Terry Galloway turned nine, the voices of everyone she loved began to disappear. No one yet knew that an experimental antibiotic given to her mother had wreaked havoc on her fetal nervous system, eventually causing her to go deaf. Galloway has used theater, whether onstage or off, to defy and transcend her reality. With disarming candor, she writes about her mental breakdowns, her queer identity, and living in a silent, quirky world populated by unforgettable characters. What could have been a bitter litany of complaint is instead an unexpectedly hilarious and affecting take on life.
    Jewish Peoplehood: An American Innovation
    Pianko, Noam. Jewish Peoplehood: An American Innovation. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2015. View the eBookAbstract
    Although fewer American Jews today describe themselves as religious, they overwhelmingly report a strong sense of belonging to the Jewish people. Indeed, Jewish peoplehood has eclipsed religion—as well as ethnicity and nationality—as the essence of what binds Jews around the globe to one another. In Jewish Peoplehood, Noam Pianko highlights the current significance and future relevance of “peoplehood” by tracing the rise, transformation, and return of this novel term. 
    Leading Educational Change: Global Issues, Challenges, and Lessons on Whole-System Reform
    Malone, Helen Janc. Leading Educational Change: Global Issues, Challenges, and Lessons on Whole-System Reform. School reform. New York: Teachers College Press, 2013. View the BookAbstract
    This collection features original essays from international superstars in the field of educational change. Each “think piece” draws on the latest knowledge from research, policy, and practice to provide important insights for creating systemic, meaningful reform. The authors directly address contemporary challenges, misconceptions, and failed strategies, while also offering solutions, ideas, and guiding questions for examination.
    Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body
    Gay, Roxane. Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body. First edition. New York: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and authority that have made her one of the most admired voices of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to be overweight in a time when the bigger you are, the less you are seen.
    Journeys of Social Justice: Women of Color Presidents in the Academy
    Pratt-Clarke, Menah, and Johanna Maes, ed. Journeys of Social Justice: Women of Color Presidents in the Academy. Black studies & critical thinking ; v. 88. New York: Peter Lang, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    This edited volume documents the unique experiences of women of color in higher education administration. Women of color share their social justice journeys to leadership roles in the academy. With a focus on women of color presidents, a rich landscape is painted through their own voices of their experiences as they ascend and lead higher education institutions, navigating complex dynamics influenced by their race, culture, class, and gender status.
    Bad Feminist: Essays
    Gay, Roxane. Bad Feminist: Essays. First edition. New York: Harper Perennial, 2014. View the BookAbstract
    In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a woman (Sweet Valley High) of color (The Help) while also taking readers on a ride through culture of the last few years (Girls, Django in Chains) and commenting on the state of feminism today (abortion, Chris Brown). The portrait that emerges is not only one of an incredibly insightful woman continually growing to understand herself and our society, but also one of our culture.
    Half and Half: Writers on Growing up Biracial and Bicultural
    O'Hearn, Claudine C., ed. Half and Half: Writers on Growing up Biracial and Bicultural. 1st ed. New York: Pantheon Books, 1998. View the BookAbstract
    As we approach the twenty-first century, biracialism and biculturalism are becoming increasingly common. Skin color and place of birth are no longer reliable signifiers of one's identity or origin. These eighteen essays, joined by a shared sense of duality, address the difficulties of not fitting into and the benefits of being part of two worlds. Through the lens of personal experience, they offer a broader spectrum of meaning for race and culture. And in the process, they map a new ethnic terrain that transcends racial and cultural division
    The Minoritisation of Higher Education Students: An Examination of Contemporary Policies and Practice
    Mieschbuehler, Ruth. The Minoritisation of Higher Education Students: An Examination of Contemporary Policies and Practice. Routledge research in higher education. Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    This book explains how group-based social differentiation and student-centred education foster the idea that ethnic and social attributes matter, losing any sense of our common humanity. Considering the consequences of this for students and university education as a whole, and challenging all pre-existing ideas of how to approach reported ethnic attainment gaps. 
    The Argonauts
    Nelson, Maggie. The Argonauts. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Graywolf Press, 2015. View the BookAbstract
    The Argonauts is a genre-bending memoir, a work of "autotheory" offering fresh, fierce, and timely thinking about desire, identity, and the limitations and possibilities of love and language. At its center is a romance: the story of the author's relationship with the artist Harry Dodge. This story, which includes Nelson's account of falling in love with Dodge, who is fluidly gendered, as well as her journey to and through a pregnancy, offers a firsthand account of the complexities and joys of (queer) family-making.
    Fading Scars: My Queer Disability History
    O'Toole, Corbett Joan, Elizabeth Grace, and Karen Nakamura. Fading Scars: My Queer Disability History. Fort Worth, TX: Autonomous Press, 2015. View the BookAbstract
    Uncovering stories about disability history and life, O’Toole shares her firsthand account of some of the most dramatic events in Disability History, and gives voice to those too often yet left out. From the 504 Sit-in and the founding of the Center for Independent Living in Berkeley, to the Disability Forum at the International Woman's Conference in Beijing; through dancing, sports, queer disability organizing and being a disabled parent, O’Toole explores her own and the disability community's power and privilege with humor, insight and honest observations.
    Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
    Vance, J. D. Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis. First edition. New York, NY: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2016. View the BookAbstract
    From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerful account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class. A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

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