Publications

    Pariah
    Rees, Dee. Pariah. United States: Universal Studios Home Entertainment, 2012. DVD @ Harvard LibraryAbstract
    Alike is a 17-year-old African-American woman who lives with her parents and younger sister in Brooklyn's Fort Greene neighborhood. She has a flair for poetry, and is a good student at her local high school. Alike is quietly but firmly embracing her identity as a lesbian. Wondering how much she can confide in her family, Alike strives to get through adolescence with grace, humor, and tenacity–sometimes succeeding, sometimes not, but always moving forward.
    Fruitvale Station
    Coogler, Ryan. Fruitvale Station. Weinstein Company, 2013. Film @ Harvard LibraryAbstract
    "Oscar wakes up on New Years's Eve and decides to try and be a better person to those he cares about. The day goes well until an encounter with police officers puts him in the national spotlight."
    Daughters of the Dust
    Dash, Julie. Daughters of the Dust. Cohen Media Group, 2017. Film @ Harvard LibraryAbstract
    "Set in 1902, members of a Gullah family from the Sea Islands off Georgia's coast struggle with the decision to move North, leaving behind a culture still very close to its African roots."
    Black Panther
    Coogler, Ryan. Black Panther. Buena Vista Home Entertainment, 2018. Film @ Harvard LibraryAbstract
    "King T'Challa returns home to the isolated, technologically advanced African nation of Wakanda to serve as new leader. However, T'Challa soon finds that he is challenged for the throne from divisions within his own country. When two enemies conspire to destroy Wakanda, the hero known as Black Panther must join forces with C.I.A. agent Everett K. Ross and members of the Wakandan Special Forces, to prevent Wakanda from being drawn into a world war."
    Blackkklansman
    Lee, Spike. Blackkklansman. Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, 2018. Film @ Harvard LibraryAbstract
    "Ron Stallworth, an African-American police officer from Colorado, successfully managed to infiltrate the local Ku Klux Klan and became the head of the local chapter."
    If Beale Street Could Talk
    Jenkins, Barry. If Beale Street Could Talk. Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, 2019. Film @ Harvard LibraryAbstract
    "A timeless love story set in early 1970s Harlem involving newly engaged nineteen-year- old Tish and her fiance Fonny who have a beautiful future ahead. But their plans are derailed when Fonny is arrested for a crime he did not commit. Now the pair and their families must fight for justice in the name of love and the promise of the American dream."
    Raising Bertie
    Byrne, Margaret. Raising Bertie. Cinema Guild, 2016. Film @ Harvard LibraryAbstract
    "Recorded over six years, Raising Bertie delivers an authentic and tender portrait of the lives of three young boys as they face a precarious coming of age within Bertie County, a rural African-American community in North Carolina. The film shows the process of growing up in a place afflicted by generations of economic and educational segregation. Growing up in a neighborhood of Bertie David "Bud" Perry calls "the 'hood," Bud has developed a tough exterior, leading to repeated suspensions for fighting and altercations with authority that threaten to derail his dreams of stability and success as an adult. Reginald "Junior" Askew lives in a small home, wedged between fields of corn, with his sister, and their mother – left to care for her children when their father was incarcerated for murder when Junior was three. For Davonte "Dada" Harrell, the youngest of the three, family is everything and the recent separation of his parents weighs heavily on his heart. All three boys attend The Hive, an alternative school for at-risk boys. But, when budget shortfalls lead the Board of Education to close The Hive, Junior, Bud, and Dada must return to Bertie High School and a system that once failed them. This documentary weaves the young men's stories together as the boys navigate school, unemployment, violence, first love, fatherhood, and estrangement from family members and mentors, all while trying to define their identities. Intimate access allows an honest portrayal of the boys' perspectives and an in-depth look at issues facing rural America's youth and what happens in the everyday lives of young people caught in the complex interplay of generational poverty, economic isolation, and educational inequity."–Container.