Publications

    Leading Educational Change: Global Issues, Challenges, and Lessons on Whole-System Reform
    Malone, Helen Janc. Leading Educational Change: Global Issues, Challenges, and Lessons on Whole-System Reform. School reform. New York: Teachers College Press, 2013. View the BookAbstract
    This collection features original essays from international superstars in the field of educational change. Each “think piece” draws on the latest knowledge from research, policy, and practice to provide important insights for creating systemic, meaningful reform. The authors directly address contemporary challenges, misconceptions, and failed strategies, while also offering solutions, ideas, and guiding questions for examination.
    Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body
    Gay, Roxane. Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body. First edition. New York: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and authority that have made her one of the most admired voices of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to be overweight in a time when the bigger you are, the less you are seen.
    Journeys of Social Justice: Women of Color Presidents in the Academy
    Pratt-Clarke, Menah, and Johanna Maes, ed. Journeys of Social Justice: Women of Color Presidents in the Academy. Black studies & critical thinking ; v. 88. New York: Peter Lang, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    This edited volume documents the unique experiences of women of color in higher education administration. Women of color share their social justice journeys to leadership roles in the academy. With a focus on women of color presidents, a rich landscape is painted through their own voices of their experiences as they ascend and lead higher education institutions, navigating complex dynamics influenced by their race, culture, class, and gender status.
    Bad Feminist: Essays
    Gay, Roxane. Bad Feminist: Essays. First edition. New York: Harper Perennial, 2014. View the BookAbstract
    In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a woman (Sweet Valley High) of color (The Help) while also taking readers on a ride through culture of the last few years (Girls, Django in Chains) and commenting on the state of feminism today (abortion, Chris Brown). The portrait that emerges is not only one of an incredibly insightful woman continually growing to understand herself and our society, but also one of our culture.
    Half and Half: Writers on Growing up Biracial and Bicultural
    O'Hearn, Claudine C., ed. Half and Half: Writers on Growing up Biracial and Bicultural. 1st ed. New York: Pantheon Books, 1998. View the BookAbstract
    As we approach the twenty-first century, biracialism and biculturalism are becoming increasingly common. Skin color and place of birth are no longer reliable signifiers of one's identity or origin. These eighteen essays, joined by a shared sense of duality, address the difficulties of not fitting into and the benefits of being part of two worlds. Through the lens of personal experience, they offer a broader spectrum of meaning for race and culture. And in the process, they map a new ethnic terrain that transcends racial and cultural division
    The Minoritisation of Higher Education Students: An Examination of Contemporary Policies and Practice
    Mieschbuehler, Ruth. The Minoritisation of Higher Education Students: An Examination of Contemporary Policies and Practice. Routledge research in higher education. Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    This book explains how group-based social differentiation and student-centred education foster the idea that ethnic and social attributes matter, losing any sense of our common humanity. Considering the consequences of this for students and university education as a whole, and challenging all pre-existing ideas of how to approach reported ethnic attainment gaps. 
    The Argonauts
    Nelson, Maggie. The Argonauts. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Graywolf Press, 2015. View the BookAbstract
    The Argonauts is a genre-bending memoir, a work of "autotheory" offering fresh, fierce, and timely thinking about desire, identity, and the limitations and possibilities of love and language. At its center is a romance: the story of the author's relationship with the artist Harry Dodge. This story, which includes Nelson's account of falling in love with Dodge, who is fluidly gendered, as well as her journey to and through a pregnancy, offers a firsthand account of the complexities and joys of (queer) family-making.
    Fading Scars: My Queer Disability History
    O'Toole, Corbett Joan, Elizabeth Grace, and Karen Nakamura. Fading Scars: My Queer Disability History. Fort Worth, TX: Autonomous Press, 2015. View the BookAbstract
    Uncovering stories about disability history and life, O’Toole shares her firsthand account of some of the most dramatic events in Disability History, and gives voice to those too often yet left out. From the 504 Sit-in and the founding of the Center for Independent Living in Berkeley, to the Disability Forum at the International Woman's Conference in Beijing; through dancing, sports, queer disability organizing and being a disabled parent, O’Toole explores her own and the disability community's power and privilege with humor, insight and honest observations.
    Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis
    Vance, J. D. Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis. First edition. New York, NY: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2016. View the BookAbstract
    From a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, a powerful account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broader, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class. A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.
    Outside the Xy: A Bklyn Boihood Anthology
    Willis, Morgan Mann. Outside the Xy: A Bklyn Boihood Anthology. 1st ed. Riverdale, NY: Riverdale Avenue Books, 2016. View the BookAbstract
    An anthology of more than 50 stories, memoirs, poems, ideas, essays and letters–all examining what it looks like, feels like, and is like to inhabit masculinity outside of cisgender manhood as people of color in the world.
    Teaching for Inclusion: Eight Principles for Effective and Equitable Practice
    Naraian, Srikala. Teaching for Inclusion: Eight Principles for Effective and Equitable Practice. New York: Teachers College Press, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    Teaching for Inclusion shows how educators navigate the competing demands of everyday practice with examples from urban, suburban, elementary, and secondary schools. The author offers eight guiding principles that can be used to advance an inclusive pedagogy. These principles permit teachers to both acknowledge and draw from the conditions within which they work, even as they uphold their commitments to equitable schooling for students from historically marginalized groups, particularly students with disabilities. Situated in the everyday realities of classrooms that often include mandated testing requirements and accountability policies, this book addresses multiple dimensions of inclusive practice including curricular decisionmaking, the "grammar" of schooling, the status of family communities, and the demands of professional roles.
    Why We Lost the ERA
    Mansbridge, Jane J. Why We Lost the ERA. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986. View the BookAbstract
    The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), which would have guaranteed women the same equal rights as men, passed Congress with an overwhelming majority in 1972. During the following ten years, the public repeatedly endorsed it in opinion surveys. Yet, for all the favor it enjoyed in the abstract, the ERA was never able to muster concrete support in enough states to become the law of the land. In this book, Jane Mansbridge explains why, as she argues that the ERA failed because it did not result in substantive changes in the position of women.
    Life of the Mind Interrupted: Essays on Mental Health and Disability in Higher Education
    Pryal, Katie Rose Guest. Life of the Mind Interrupted: Essays on Mental Health and Disability in Higher Education. Chapel Hill, NC: Blue Crow Publishing, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    The essays in this book cover topics such as disclosure of disabilities, accommodations and accessibility, how to be a good abled friend to a disabled person, the trigger warnings debate, and more. Written for a popular audience, for those with disabilities and for those who want to learn more about living a disabled life, Life of the Mind Interrupted aims to make higher education, and the rest of our society, more humane.
    A Darker Shade of Crimson: Odyssey of a Harvard Chicano
    Navarrette, Ruben. A Darker Shade of Crimson: Odyssey of a Harvard Chicano. New York: Bantam Books, 1994. View the BookAbstract
    In 1985 an ambitious young Mexican-American from California’s rural San Joaquin Valley became one of the few Latinos to enter America’s most prestigious university. With intelligence and grace, Navarrette chronicles his experiences at Harvard, where he confronted questions of identity and ethnicity, and wrestled with the need to reconcile his values and opinions with the expectations of his family, his race, and society at large. More than a deeply personal memoir, A Darker Shade of Crimson also dares to pursue the complex questions of what needs to be done to provide a quality education for Latinos and other minorities in America.

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