Publications

    Southern Comfort
    Davis, Kate. Southern Comfort. Docurama, 2003. View the FilmAbstract
    Southern Comfort is a 2001 documentary film about the final year in the life of Robert Eads, a transgender man. Eads, diagnosed with ovarian cancer, was turned down for treatment by a dozen doctors out of fear that treating such a patient would hurt their reputations. By the time Eads received treatment, the cancer was too advanced to save his life.
    Assata: An Autobiography
    Shakur, Assata, and Angela Davis. Assata: An Autobiography. Chicago: Lawrence Hill Books, 2001. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    Longtime activist, author and political figure Angela Davis brings us this expose of the women's movement in the context of the fight for civil rights and working class issues. She uncovers a side of the fight for suffrage many of us have not heard: the intimate tie between the anti-slavery campaign and the struggle for women's suffrage. She shows how the racist and classist bias of some in the women's movement have divided its own membership.
    Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity
    Serano, Julia. Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity. Second edition. Emeryville, CA: Seal Press, 2007. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    In the updated second edition of Whipping Girl, Julia Serano, a transsexual woman whose supremely intelligent writing reflects her diverse background as a lesbian transgender activist and professional biologist, shares her powerful experiences and observations—both pre- and post-transition—to reveal the ways in which fear, suspicion, and dismissiveness toward femininity shape our societal attitudes toward trans women, as well as gender and sexuality as a whole.
    Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body
    Gay, Roxane. Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body. First edition. New York: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and authority that have made her one of the most admired voices of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to be overweight in a time when the bigger you are, the less you are seen.
    Journeys of Social Justice: Women of Color Presidents in the Academy
    Pratt-Clarke, Menah, and Johanna Maes, ed. Journeys of Social Justice: Women of Color Presidents in the Academy. Black studies & critical thinking ; v. 88. New York: Peter Lang, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    This edited volume documents the unique experiences of women of color in higher education administration. Women of color share their social justice journeys to leadership roles in the academy. With a focus on women of color presidents, a rich landscape is painted through their own voices of their experiences as they ascend and lead higher education institutions, navigating complex dynamics influenced by their race, culture, class, and gender status.
    Bad Feminist: Essays
    Gay, Roxane. Bad Feminist: Essays. First edition. New York: Harper Perennial, 2014. View the BookAbstract
    In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a woman (Sweet Valley High) of color (The Help) while also taking readers on a ride through culture of the last few years (Girls, Django in Chains) and commenting on the state of feminism today (abortion, Chris Brown). The portrait that emerges is not only one of an incredibly insightful woman continually growing to understand herself and our society, but also one of our culture.
    The Argonauts
    Nelson, Maggie. The Argonauts. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Graywolf Press, 2015. View the BookAbstract
    The Argonauts is a genre-bending memoir, a work of "autotheory" offering fresh, fierce, and timely thinking about desire, identity, and the limitations and possibilities of love and language. At its center is a romance: the story of the author's relationship with the artist Harry Dodge. This story, which includes Nelson's account of falling in love with Dodge, who is fluidly gendered, as well as her journey to and through a pregnancy, offers a firsthand account of the complexities and joys of (queer) family-making.
    Outside the Xy: A Bklyn Boihood Anthology
    Willis, Morgan Mann. Outside the Xy: A Bklyn Boihood Anthology. 1st ed. Riverdale, NY: Riverdale Avenue Books, 2016. View the BookAbstract
    An anthology of more than 50 stories, memoirs, poems, ideas, essays and letters–all examining what it looks like, feels like, and is like to inhabit masculinity outside of cisgender manhood as people of color in the world.
    Why We Lost the ERA
    Mansbridge, Jane J. Why We Lost the ERA. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986. View the BookAbstract
    The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), which would have guaranteed women the same equal rights as men, passed Congress with an overwhelming majority in 1972. During the following ten years, the public repeatedly endorsed it in opinion surveys. Yet, for all the favor it enjoyed in the abstract, the ERA was never able to muster concrete support in enough states to become the law of the land. In this book, Jane Mansbridge explains why, as she argues that the ERA failed because it did not result in substantive changes in the position of women.
    Counternarratives from Women of Color Academics: Bravery, Vulnerability, and Resistance
    Whitaker, Manya Catrice, and Eric Anthony Grollman, ed. Counternarratives from Women of Color Academics: Bravery, Vulnerability, and Resistance. New York: Routledge, 2019. View the eBookAbstract
    This book documents the lived experiences of women of color academics who have leveraged their professional positions to challenge the status quo in their scholarship, teaching, service, activism, and leadership. By presenting reflexive work from various vantage points within and outside of the academy, contributors document the cultivation of mentoring relationships, the use of administrative roles to challenge institutional leadership, and more.
    If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Qurʼan
    Power, Carla. If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Qurʼan. 1st ed. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2015. View the BookAbstract
    If the Oceans Were Ink is Carla Power's story of how she and her longtime friend Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi found a way to confront ugly stereotypes and persistent misperceptions that were cleaving their communities. Their friendship -- between a secular American and a madrasa-trained sheikh -- had always seemed unlikely, but now they were frustrated and bewildered by the battles being fought in their names. Both knew that a close look at the Quran would reveal a faith that preached peace and not mass murder; respect for women and not oppression. And so they embarked on a yearlong journey through the controversial text. A journalist who grew up in the Midwest and the Middle East, Power offers her unique vantage point on the Quran's most provocative verses as she debates with Akram at cafes, family gatherings, and packed lecture halls, conversations filled with both good humor and powerful insights. Their story takes them to madrasas in India and pilgrimage sites in Mecca, as they encounter politicians and jihadis, feminist activists and conservative scholars.
    Miss Representation
    Newsom, Jennifer Siebel. Miss Representation. Virgil Films and Entertainment, 2011. View the FIlm- Harvard KeyAbstract
    Explores how mainstream media contributes to the under-representation of women in influential positions in America and challenges the media's portrayals of women.
    I Am a Girl
    I Am a Girl. Women Make Movies, 2013. View the Film- Harvard KeyAbstract
    There is a group of people in the world today who are more persecuted than anyone else, but they are not political or religious activists. They are girls. Being born a girl means you are more likely to be subjected to violence, disease, poverty and disadvantage than any other group on Earth. The portraits in this poetic, observational documentary underscore the urgent need for education for young girls. I Am a Girl reveals what it means to grow up female in the 21st century with resilience, bravery and hope.
    Inclusive Leadership: Negotiating Gendered Spaces
    Adapa, Sujana, and Alison Sheridan, ed. Inclusive Leadership: Negotiating Gendered Spaces. Palgrave studies in leadership and followership. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    Examining perceptions of leaders which are dependent on social and cultural contexts, this edited collection argues that in order to thrive and to understand the future business landscape, leaders must be inclusive and create followership. Addressing the under-representation of women in leadership roles, contributions explore inclusivity and exclusivity in leading organisations, the politics of gendered differences and the value of leader-follower dynamics.
    Coping with Gender Inequities: Critical Conversations of Women Faculty
    Thompson, Sherwood, and Pam Parry, ed. Coping with Gender Inequities: Critical Conversations of Women Faculty. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    This book provides a discussion of women faculty members' experiences on college and university campuses and examines their thoughts, perceptions, responsibilities, and status in the academy. Most specifically, this book explores the differences between male and women faculty in the academy; women faculty insight into teaching, research and service; how women faculty perceive their work environment; and the stress of faculty evaluation regarding tenure and promotion, and sharing of success stories and lessons learned.
    Degrees of Difference: Women, Men, and the Value of Higher Education
    Niemi, Nancy S. Degrees of Difference: Women, Men, and the Value of Higher Education. New York: Routledge, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    This volume investigates the dissonance between the supposed advantage held by educated women and their continued lack of economic and political power. Niemi explains the developments of the so-called "female advantage" and "boy crisis" in American higher education, setting them alongside socioeconomic and racial developments in women’s and men’s lives throughout the last 40 years. Exploring the relationship between higher education credentials and their utility in creating political, economic, and social success, Degrees of Difference identifies ways in which gender and academic achievement contribute to women’s and men’s power to shape their lives. This important book brings new light to the issues of power, gender identities, and the role of American higher education in creating gender equity. (Abstract from publisher.
    Critical Approaches to Women and Gender in Higher Education
    Eddy, Pamela Lynn, Kelly Ward, and Tehmina Khwaja, ed. Critical Approaches to Women and Gender in Higher Education. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    Despite the increasing numbers of women in higher education, gendered structures continue to hinder women’s advancement in academia. This book goes beyond the numbers to examine the issues facing those members of academia with non-dominant gender identities.
    Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites Use Women's Labor and Ideas to Exploit the World
    Eisenstein, Hester. Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites Use Women's Labor and Ideas to Exploit the World. Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2016. View the BookAbstract

    In a pioneering reinterpretation of the role of mainstream feminism, Eisenstein shows how the world's ruling elites utilize women's labor and the ideas of women's liberation and empowerment to maintain their economic and political power, both at home and abroad. Her explorations range from the abolition of "welfare as we know it" in the United States to the creation of export-processing zones in the global South that depend on women's "nimble fingers"; from the championing of microcredit as a path to women's empowerment in the global South to the claim of women's presumed liberation in the West as an ideological weapon in the war on terrorism.

    Eisenstein challenges activists and intellectuals to recognize that international feminism is at a fateful crossroads. She argues that it is crucial for feminists to throw in their lot with the progressive forces that are seeking alternatives to globalized corporate capitalism.

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