Publications

    Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture
    Morales, Ed. Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture. London ; Brooklyn, N.Y. Verso, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    The Latinx revolution in US culture, society, and politics. Latinx is the gender-neutral term that covers the largest racial minority in the United States, 17 percent of the country. In this groundbreaking discussion, Ed Morales explains how Latin political identities are tied to a long Latin American history of mestizaje, translatable as "mixedness" or "hybridity", and that this border thinking is both a key to understanding bilingual, bicultural Latin cultures and politics and a challenge to America's infamously black/white racial regime..
    Civil rights and beyond: African American and Latino/a activism in the twentieth-century United States
    Behnken, Brian D., ed. Civil rights and beyond: African American and Latino/a activism in the twentieth-century United States. Athens: The University of Georgia Press, 2016. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
    Civil Rights and Beyond examines the dynamic relationships between African American and Latino/a activists in the United States from the 1930s to the present day. Building on recent scholarship, this book pushes the timeframe for the study of interactions between blacks and a variety of Latino/a groups beyond the standard chronology of the civil rights era. As such, the book merges a host of community histories–each with their own distinct historical experiences and activisms–to explore group dynamics, differing strategies and activist moments, and the broader quests of these communities for rights and social justice. The collection is framed around the concept of “activism,” which most fully encompasses the relationships that blacks and Latinos have enjoyed throughout the twentieth century. Wide ranging and pioneering, Civil Rights and Beyond explores black and Latino/a activism from California to Florida, Chicago to Bakersfield–and a host of other communities and cities–to demonstrate the complicated nature of African American-Latino/a activism in the twentieth-century United States.–Publisher website.
    Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive
    Serano, Julia. Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive. Berkeley, CA: Seal Press, 2013. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    Among LGBTQ activists, there is a long history of lesbians and gay men dismissing bisexuals, transgender people, and other gender and sexual minorities. In each case, exclusion is based on the premise that certain ways of being gendered or sexual are more legitimate, natural, or righteous than others. In Excluded, Julia Serano chronicles many of these instances of exclusion and argues that marginalizing others often stems from a handful of assumptions that are routinely made about gender and sexuality.
    From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation
    Taylor, Keeanga-Yamahtta. From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation. Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2016. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

    "Activist and scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and persistence of structural inequality such as mass incarceration and Black unemployment. In this context, she argues that this new struggle against police violence holds the potential to reignite a broader push for Black liberation"--Front flap.

    Print Book Also Available (HOLLIS #990145227100203941)

    Whitewashed: America's Invisible Middle Eastern Minority
    Tehranian, John. Whitewashed: America's Invisible Middle Eastern Minority. New York: New York University Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
    Focusing on the contemporary immigration debate, the war on terrorism, media portrayals of Middle Easterners, and the processes of creating racial stereo-types, John Tehranian argues that, despite its many successes, the modern civil rights movement has not done enough to protect the liberties of Middle Eastern Americans, By following how concepts of whiteness have transformed over time, Whitewashed forces readers to rethink and question some of their most deeply held assumptions about race in American society.
    Learning to Be Latino: How Colleges Shape Identity Politics
    Verduzco Reyes, Daisy. Learning to Be Latino: How Colleges Shape Identity Politics. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

    In Learning to Be Latino, sociologist Daisy Verduzco Reyes paints a vivid picture of Latino student life at a liberal arts college, a research university, and a regional public university, outlining students’ interactions with one another, with non-Latino peers, and with faculty, administrators, and the outside community. Reyes identifies the normative institutional arrangements that shape the social relationships relevant to Latino students’ lives, including school size, the demographic profile of the student body, residential arrangements, the relationship between students and administrators, and how well diversity programs integrate students through cultural centers and retention centers. Together these characteristics create an environment for Latino students that influences how they interact, identify, and come to understand their place on campus.
     
    Drawing on extensive ethnographic observations, Reyes shows how college campuses shape much more than students’ academic and occupational trajectories; they mold students’ ideas about inequality and opportunity in America, their identities, and even how they intend to practice politics.  

    Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation
    Clare, Eli. Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation. Cambridge, MA: South End Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
     
    Muslims, Identity, and American Politics
    Calfano, Brian Robert. Muslims, Identity, and American Politics. Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    An examination of the pressures faced by Muslims, often considered political and social outsiders in western nations. Though citizens and second generation residents in many cases, American Muslims face a combination of suspicion, government scrutiny, and social segregation in the United States. The book examines how group influence, emotions, and religious interpretation contribute to the political orientation and behaviour of a national sample of Muslims living in the American context. A compelling explanation of how members of an ostracized political group marshal the motivation to become fully engaged political actors.
    Deep Roots : How Slavery Still Shapes Southern Politics
    Sen, Maya, Avidit Acharya, and Matthew Blackwell. Deep Roots : How Slavery Still Shapes Southern Politics. Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

    While legislation such as the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act made huge strides in increasing economic opportunity and reducing educational disparities, southern slavery has had a profound, lasting, and self-reinforcing influence on regional and national politics that can still be felt today in the South.

    FInd the Print Book in HOLLIS