Publications

    Inclusive Leadership: Negotiating Gendered Spaces
    Adapa, Sujana, and Alison Sheridan, ed. Inclusive Leadership: Negotiating Gendered Spaces. Palgrave studies in leadership and followership. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    Examining perceptions of leaders which are dependent on social and cultural contexts, this edited collection argues that in order to thrive and to understand the future business landscape, leaders must be inclusive and create followership. Addressing the under-representation of women in leadership roles, contributions explore inclusivity and exclusivity in leading organisations, the politics of gendered differences and the value of leader-follower dynamics.
    Privilege, Power, and Difference
    Johnson, Allan G. Privilege, Power, and Difference. Third edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    This short book is a tool for students and non-students alike to examine systems of privilege and difference in our society. Written in an accessible, conversational style, Johnson links theory with engaging examples in ways that enable readers to see the underlying nature and consequences of privilege and their connection to it.
    The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America
    Rothstein, Richard. The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America. First edition. New York ; London: Liveright Publishing Corporation, a division of W.W. Norton & Company, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America’s cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation―the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments―that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.
    Coping with Gender Inequities: Critical Conversations of Women Faculty
    Thompson, Sherwood, and Pam Parry, ed. Coping with Gender Inequities: Critical Conversations of Women Faculty. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    This book provides a discussion of women faculty members' experiences on college and university campuses and examines their thoughts, perceptions, responsibilities, and status in the academy. Most specifically, this book explores the differences between male and women faculty in the academy; women faculty insight into teaching, research and service; how women faculty perceive their work environment; and the stress of faculty evaluation regarding tenure and promotion, and sharing of success stories and lessons learned.
    The Making of Asian America: A History
    Lee, Erika. The Making of Asian America: A History. First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 2015. View the BookAbstract
    A history of Asian Americans by one of the nation's preeminent scholars on the subject. In the past fifty years, Asian Americans have helped change the face of America and are now the fastest growing group in the United States. But as award-winning historian Erika Lee reminds us, Asian Americans also have deep roots in the country. The Making of Asian America tells the little-known history of Asian Americans and their role in American life, from the arrival of the first Asians in the Americas to the present-day. This book shows how generations of Asian immigrants and their American-born descendants have made and remade Asian American life in the United States.
    Degrees of Difference: Women, Men, and the Value of Higher Education
    Niemi, Nancy S. Degrees of Difference: Women, Men, and the Value of Higher Education. New York: Routledge, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    This volume investigates the dissonance between the supposed advantage held by educated women and their continued lack of economic and political power. Niemi explains the developments of the so-called "female advantage" and "boy crisis" in American higher education, setting them alongside socioeconomic and racial developments in women’s and men’s lives throughout the last 40 years. Exploring the relationship between higher education credentials and their utility in creating political, economic, and social success, Degrees of Difference identifies ways in which gender and academic achievement contribute to women’s and men’s power to shape their lives. This important book brings new light to the issues of power, gender identities, and the role of American higher education in creating gender equity. (Abstract from publisher.
    Boy Erased
    Edgerton, Joel. Boy Erased. Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, 2019. View the FilmAbstract
    Boy Erased tells the courageous story of Jared Eamons, the son of a Baptist pastor in a small American town, who must overcome the fallout of being outed to his parents. His parents struggle with reconciling their love for their son with their beliefs. Fearing a loss of family, friends, and community, Jared is pressured into attending a conversion therapy program. While there, Jared comes into conflict with its leader and begins his journey to finding his own voice and accepting his true self.
    Blackkklansman
    Lee, Spike. Blackkklansman. Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, 2018. View the FilmAbstract
    Ron Stallworth, an African-American police officer from Colorado, successfully managed to infiltrate the local Ku Klux Klan and became the head of the local chapter.
    Grateful Nation: Student Veterans and the Rise of the "Military-Friendly" Campus
    Moore, Ellen. Grateful Nation: Student Veterans and the Rise of the "Military-Friendly" Campus. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2017. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
    In today's volunteer military many recruits enlist for the educational benefits, yet a significant number of veterans struggle in the classroom, and many drop out. The difficulties faced by student veterans have been attributed to various factors: poor academic preparation, PTSD and other postwar ailments, and allegedly antimilitary sentiments on college campuses. In Grateful Nation Ellen Moore challenges these narratives by tracing the experiences of Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans at two California college campuses. Drawing on interviews with dozens of veterans, classroom observations, and assessments of the work of veteran support organizations, Moore finds that veterans' academic struggles result from their military training and combat experience, which complicate their ability to function in civilian schools. While there is little evidence of antimilitary bias on college campuses, Moore demonstrates the ways in which college programs that conflate support for veterans with support for the institutional military lead to suppression of campus debate about the wars, discourage antiwar activism, and encourage a growing militarization.
    After Combat: True War Stories from Iraq and Afghanistan
    Eide, Marian, and Michael Gibler. After Combat: True War Stories from Iraq and Afghanistan. Lincoln: Potomac Books, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
    Approximately 2.5 million men and women have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan in the service of the U.S. War on Terror. Marian Eide and Michael Gibler have collected and compiled personal combat accounts from some of these war veterans. In modern warfare no deployment meets the expectations laid down by stories of Appomattox, Ypres, Iwo Jima, or Tet. Stuck behind a desk or the wheel of a truck, many of today’s veterans feel they haven’t even been to war though they may have listened to mortars in the night or dodged improvised explosive devices during the day. When a drone is needed to verify a target’s death or bullets are sprayed like grass seed, military offensives can lack the immediacy that comes with direct contact.
    After Combat bridges the gap between sensationalized media and reality by telling war’s unvarnished stories. Participating soldiers, sailors, marines, and air force personnel (retired, on leave, or at the beginning of military careers) describe combat in the ways they believe it should be understood. In this collection of interviews, veterans speak anonymously with pride about their own strengths and accomplishments, with gratitude for friendships and adventures, and also with shame, regret, and grief, while braving controversy, misunderstanding, and sanction.
    Veterans' Policies, Veterans' Politics: New Perspectives on Veterans in the Modern United States
    Ortiz, Stephen R., ed. Veterans' Policies, Veterans' Politics: New Perspectives on Veterans in the Modern United States. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
    Veterans' Policies, Veterans' Politics is the first multidisciplinary, comprehensive examination of the American veteran experience. Stephen Ortiz has compiled some of the best work on the formation and impact of veterans' policies, the politics of veterans' issues, and veterans' political engagement over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in the United States.
    Waking up White: And Finding Myself in the Story of Race
    Irving, Debby. Waking up White: And Finding Myself in the Story of Race. Cambridge, MA: Elephant Room Press, 2014. View the BookAbstract
    For twenty-five years, Debby Irving sensed inexplicable racial tensions in her personal and professional relationships. As a colleague and neighbor, she worried about offending people she dearly wanted to befriend. As an arts administrator, she didn't understand why her diversity efforts lacked traction. In Waking Up White, Irving tells her often cringe-worthy story with such openness that readers will turn every page rooting for her-and ultimately for all of us.
    When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir
    Khan-Cullors, Patrisse. When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir. First edition. New York: St Martin's Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    Raised by a single mother in an impoverished neighborhood in Los Angeles, Patrisse Khan-Cullors experienced firsthand the prejudice and persecution Black Americans endure at the hands of law enforcement. In 2013, when Trayvon Martin's killer went free, Patrisse's outrage led her to co-found Black Lives Matter with Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi. Condemned as terrorists and as a threat to America, the women founded a hashtag that birthed the movement to demand accountability from the authorities who continually turn a blind eye to the injustices inflicted upon people of Black and Brown skin.
    Has the Gay Movement Failed?
    Duberman, Martin B, Has the Gay Movement Failed?. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    The past fifty years have seen significant shifts in attitudes toward LGBTQ people and wider acceptance of them in the United States and the West. Yet the extent of this progress, argues Martin Duberman, has been more broad and conservative than deep and transformative. One of the most renowned historians of the American left and LGBTQ movement, as well as a pioneering social-justice activist, Duberman reviews the fifty years since Stonewall with an immediacy and rigor that informs and energizes. He revisits the early gay movement and its progressive vision for society, and puts the left on notice as failing time and again to embrace the queer potential for social transformation. Acknowledging the elimination of some of the most discriminatory policies that plagued earlier generations, he takes note of the cost--the sidelining of radical goals on the way to achieving more normative inclusion. Illuminating the fault lines both within and beyond the movements of the past and today, this critical book is also hopeful. Duberman urges us to learn from this history to fight for a truly inclusive and expansive society.
    Critical Approaches to Women and Gender in Higher Education
    Eddy, Pamela Lynn, Kelly Ward, and Tehmina Khwaja, ed. Critical Approaches to Women and Gender in Higher Education. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    Despite the increasing numbers of women in higher education, gendered structures continue to hinder women’s advancement in academia. This book goes beyond the numbers to examine the issues facing those members of academia with non-dominant gender identities.
    Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites Use Women's Labor and Ideas to Exploit the World
    Eisenstein, Hester. Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites Use Women's Labor and Ideas to Exploit the World. Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2016. View the BookAbstract

    In a pioneering reinterpretation of the role of mainstream feminism, Eisenstein shows how the world's ruling elites utilize women's labor and the ideas of women's liberation and empowerment to maintain their economic and political power, both at home and abroad. Her explorations range from the abolition of "welfare as we know it" in the United States to the creation of export-processing zones in the global South that depend on women's "nimble fingers"; from the championing of microcredit as a path to women's empowerment in the global South to the claim of women's presumed liberation in the West as an ideological weapon in the war on terrorism.

    Eisenstein challenges activists and intellectuals to recognize that international feminism is at a fateful crossroads. She argues that it is crucial for feminists to throw in their lot with the progressive forces that are seeking alternatives to globalized corporate capitalism.

    Becoming American?: The Forging of Arab and Muslim Identity in Pluralist America
    Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck. Becoming American?: The Forging of Arab and Muslim Identity in Pluralist America. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2011. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    Countless generations of Arabs and Muslims have called the United States home. Yet while diversity and pluralism continue to define contemporary America, many Muslims are viewed by their neighbors as painful reminders of conflict and violence. In this concise volume, renowned historian Yvonne Haddad argues that American Muslim identity is as uniquely American it is for as any other race, nationality, or religion.

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