Publications

    The Complete Academic Search Manual: A Systematic Approach to Successful and Inclusive Hiring
    Vicker, Lauren A., and Harriette J. Royer. The Complete Academic Search Manual: A Systematic Approach to Successful and Inclusive Hiring. Herndon: Stylus Publishing, 2011. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    This manual provides faculty members, department heads, chairs, deans, and members of search committees with a straightforward ten-step process, using proven strategies and systematic planning, designed to facilitate group dynamics while members seek out and identify high caliber candidates and reach consensus on the best one for the institution.
    Stories from the Front of the Room: How Higher Education Faculty of Color Overcome Challenges and Thrive in the Academy
    Harris, Michelle, Sherrill L Sellers, Orly Clerge, and Frederick W. Jr. Gooding, ed. Stories from the Front of the Room: How Higher Education Faculty of Color Overcome Challenges and Thrive in the Academy. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    This book focuses on the boundaries which faculty of color encounter in everyday experiences on campus and presents a more complete picture of life in the academy - one that documents how faculty of color are tested, but also how they can not only overcome, but thrive in their respective educational institutions.
    The Color of Privilege: Three Blasphemies on Race and Feminism
    Hurtado, Aída. The Color of Privilege: Three Blasphemies on Race and Feminism. Critical perspectives on women and gender. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    This book explores how women of different ethnic/racial groups conceive of feminism. Aída Hurtado advances the theory of relational privilege to explain those differing conceptions. She argues that the different responses to feminism by women of color are not so much the result of personality or cultural differences between white women and women of color, but of their differing relationship to white men.
    Queer People of Color in Higher Education
    Johnson, Joshua Moon, and Gabriel Javier. Queer People of Color in Higher Education. Contemporary perspectives on LGBTQ advocacy in societies. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, Inc, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    A comprehensive work discussing the lived experiences of queer people of color on college campuses. This book will create conversations and provide resources to best support students, faculty, and staff of color who are people of color and identify as LGBTQ. The edited volume covers emerging issues that are affecting higher education around the country.
    Disability as Diversity in Higher Education: Policies and Practices to Enhance Student Success
    Kim, Eunyoung, and Katherine C. Aquino, ed. Disability as Diversity in Higher Education: Policies and Practices to Enhance Student Success. New York, NY: Routledge is an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    Addressing disability not as a form of student impairment - as it is typically perceived at the postsecondary level - but rather as an important dimension of student diversity and identity, this book explores how disability can be more effectively incorporated into college environments. Chapters propose new perspectives, empirical research, and case studies to provide the necessary foundation for understanding the role of disability within campus climate and integrating students with disabilities into academic and social settings.
    The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy
    Wilson, William J. The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012. View the BookAbstract
    Renowned American sociologist William Julius Wilson takes a look at the social transformation of inner city ghettos, offering a sharp evaluation of the convergence of race and poverty. Rejecting both conservative and liberal interpretations of life in the inner city, Wilson offers essential information and a number of solutions to policymakers. The Truly Disadvantaged is a wide-ranging examination, looking at the relationship between race, employment, and education from the 1950s onwards, with surprising and provocative findings. This second edition also includes a new afterword from Wilson himself that brings the book up to date and offers fresh insight into its findings.
    Confronting Equity Issues on Campus: Implementing the Equity Scorecard in Theory and Practice
    Malcom-Piqueux, Lindsey E., and Estela Mara Bensimon, ed. Confronting Equity Issues on Campus: Implementing the Equity Scorecard in Theory and Practice. Sterling, Va. Stylus, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    Drawing on the theory of action research, the Equity Scorecard creates a structure for practitioners to become investigators of their own institutional culture, to become aware of racial disparities, confront their own practices and learn how things are done on their own turf to ask: In what ways am I contributing to equity/inequity?
    Beyond Retention: Cultivating Spaces of Equity, Justice, and Fairness for Women of Color in U.S. Higher Education
    Marina, Brenda Louise Hammett, and Sabrina Ross, ed. Beyond Retention: Cultivating Spaces of Equity, Justice, and Fairness for Women of Color in U.S. Higher Education. Research for social justice. Charlotte, North Carolina: Information Age Publishing, Inc, 2016. View the BookAbstract
    This book addresses the continued underrepresentation of women faculty of color at predominantly White colleges and universities. This text will be of interest to scholars interested in curriculum topics of race, gender, sexuality, and place.
    African American Males in Higher Education Leadership: Challenges and Opportunities
    Mitchell (Ed.), Patricia A. African American Males in Higher Education Leadership: Challenges and Opportunities. Black studies & critical thinking ; v. 90. New York: Peter Lang, 2017. View the BookAbstract
    African American Males in Higher Education Leadership: Challenges and Opportunities presents narratives from thirteen African American males working in higher education leadership. Their narratives describe the barriers and roadblocks that continue to impede them while climbing the ivory tower ladder to leadership.
    Jewish American Paradox: The Chosen People and Modern Choices
    Mnookin, Robert. Jewish American Paradox: The Chosen People and Modern Choices. Public Affairs, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    In this thoughtful and perceptive book, Robert H. Mnookin argues that the answers of the past no longer serve American Jews today. The book boldly promotes a radically inclusive American-Jewish community--one where being Jewish can depend on personal choice and public self-identification, not simply birth or formal religious conversion. Instead of preventing intermarriage or ostracizing those critical of Israel, he envisions a community that embraces diversity and debate, and in so doing, preserves and strengthens the Jewish identity into the next generation and beyond.
    The Declining Significance of Race: Blacks and Changing American Institutions
    Wilson, William J. The Declining Significance of Race: Blacks and Changing American Institutions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012. View the BookAbstract
    The Declining Significance of Race immediately sparked controversy with its contentious thesis that race was becoming less of a deciding factor in the life chances of black Americans than class.  This new edition of the seminal book includes a new afterword in which William Julius Wilson not only reflects on the debate surrounding the book, but also presents a provocative discussion of race, class, and social policy.
    Accountability and Opportunity in Higher Education: The Civil Rights Dimension
    Orfield, Gary, and Nicholas W. Hillman, ed. Accountability and Opportunity in Higher Education: The Civil Rights Dimension. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard Education Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    Leading scholars address the unforeseen impact of accountability standards on students of color and the institutions that disproportionately serve them. The book, part of the ongoing body of work by the Civil Rights Project, describes how federal policies can worsen existing racial inequalities in higher education and offers alternative solutions aimed to protect and advance civil rights for low-income and minority students and their colleges.
    An African American and LatinX History of the United States
    Ortiz, Paul. An African American and LatinX History of the United States. Boston: Beacon Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    Scholar and activist,Paul Ortiz, challenges the notion of westward progress as exalted by widely taught formulations such as "manifest destiny" and "Jacksonian democracy," and shows how placing African American, Latinx, and Indigenous voices unapologetically front and center transforms US history into one of the working class organizing against imperialism.
    People with Disabilities: Sidelined or Mainstreamed?
    Schur, Lisa. People with Disabilities: Sidelined or Mainstreamed?. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2013. View the BookAbstract
    This book provides an overview of the progress and continuing disparities faced by people with disabilities around the world, reviewing hundreds of studies and presenting new evidence from analysis of surveys and interviews with disability leaders. It shows the connections among economic, political and social inclusion, and how the experience of disability can vary by gender, race and ethnicity. It uses a multidisciplinary approach, drawing on theoretical models and research in economics, political science, psychology, disability studies, law and sociology.
    Thank You for Your Service
    Finkel, David. Thank You for Your Service. 1st ed. New York: Sarah Crichton Books/ Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013. View the BookAbstract
    From a MacArthur Fellow and the author of The Good Soldiers, a profound look at life after war. No journalist has reckoned with the psychology of war as intimately as David Finkel. In The Good Soldiers, his bestselling account from the front lines of Baghdad, Finkel shadowed the men of the 2-16 Infantry Battalion as they carried out the infamous surge, a grueling fifteen-month tour that changed all of them forever. Now Finkel has followed many of those same men as they've returned home and struggled to reintegrate--both into their family lives and into American society at large.
    Daughters of the Dust
    Dash, Julie. Daughters of the Dust. Kino Video, 2000. View the FilmAbstract
    Daughters of the Dust is a 1991 independent film written, directed and produced by Julie Dash and is the first feature film directed by an African-American woman distributed theatrically in the United States. Set in 1902, it tells the story of three generations of Gullah (also known as Geechee) women in the Peazant family on Saint Helena Island as they prepare to migrate to the North on the mainland.
    This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color
    Moraga, Cherríe, and Gloria Anzaldúa, ed. This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. Fourth edition. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2015. View the BookAbstract
    Through personal essays, criticism, interviews, testimonials, poetry, and visual art, this collection expores, as coeditor Cherrie Moraga writes, 'the complex confluence of identities–race, class, gender, sexuality–systemic to women of color oppression and liberation."
    The Time between Places: Stories That Weave In and Out of Egypt and America
    Kaldas, Pauline. The Time between Places: Stories That Weave In and Out of Egypt and America. University of Arkansas Press, 2010. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    This collection of twenty stories delves into the lives of Egyptian characters, from those living in Egypt to those who have immigrated to the United States. With subtle and eloquent prose, the complexities of these characters are revealed, opening a door into their intimate struggles with identity and place. We meet people who are tempted by the possibilities of America and others who are tempted by the desire to return home. Some are in the throes of re-creating themselves in the new world while others seem to be embedded in the loss of their homeland. Many of these characters, although physically located in either the United States or Egypt, have lives that embrace both cultures.
    The Voice at the Back Door
    Spencer, Elizabeth. The Voice at the Back Door. Louisiana State University Press, 1994. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

    In the mid-1950s, the town of Lacey in the Mississippi hill country is a place where the lives of blacks and whites, though seemingly separate, are in fact historically and inevitably intertwined. When Lacey's fair-haired boy, Duncan Harper, is appointed interim sheriff, he makes public his private convictions about the equality of blacks before the law, and the combined threat and promise he represents to the understood order of things in Lacey affects almost every member of the community. In the end, Harper succeeds in pointing the way for individuals, both black and white, to find a more harmonious coexistence, but at a sacrifice all must come to regret.

    In The Voice at the Back Door, Mississippi native Elizabeth Spencer gives form to the many voices that shaped her view of race relations while growing up, and at the same time discovers her own voice -- one of hope. Employing her extraordinary literary powers -- finely honed narrative techniques, insight into a rich, diverse cast of characters, and an unerring ear for dialect -- Spencer makes palpable the psychological milieu of a small southern town hobbled by tradition but lurching toward the dawn of the civil rights movement. First published in 1956, The Voice at the Back Door is Spencer's most highly praised novel yet, and her last to treat small-town life in Mississippi.

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