Publications

    Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide
    Chermayeff, Maro. Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. Roco FIlms, 2012. View the film (Harvard Key)Abstract
     Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, based on the widely acclaimed book by Pulitzer Prize winners Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn was filmed in 10 countries and follows Kristof, WuDunn, and celebrity activists America Ferrera, Diane Lane, Eva Mendes, Meg Ryan, Gabrielle Union, and Olivia Wilde on a journey to tell the stories of inspiring, courageous individuals. Across the globe oppression is being confronted, and real meaningful solutions are being fashioned through health care, education, and economic empowerment for women and girls.
    Teaching for Critical Thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question Their Assumptions
    Brookfield, Stephen. Teaching for Critical Thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question Their Assumptions. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2012. View the BookAbstract
    Stephen Brookfield builds on his last three decades of experience running workshops and teaching courses on critical thinking to explore how student learn to think this way, and what teachers can do the help students develop this capacity. He outlines a basic protocol of critical thinking as a learning process that focuses on uncovering and checking assumptions, exploring alternative perspectives, and taking informed actions as a result.
    Gender and sexual diversity in U.S. higher education : contexts and opportunities for LGBTQ college students
    Stewart, Dafina Lazarus, Kristen Renn, and G. Blue Brazelton, ed. Gender and sexual diversity in U.S. higher education : contexts and opportunities for LGBTQ college students. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2015. ViewAbstract
    Since 2005, research on identity development, campus climate and policies, transgender issues, and institutional features such as type, leadership, and campus resources has broadened to encompass LGBTQ student engagement and success. This volume includes this enlarged body of research on LGBTQ students, taken in the context of widespread changes in public attitudes and public policies related to LGBTQ people, integrating scholarship and student affairs practice. 
     
    What Works: Gender Equality by Design
    Bohnet, Iris. What Works: Gender Equality by Design. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    Gender equality is a moral and a business imperative. But unconscious bias holds us back and de-biasing minds has proven to be difficult and expensive. Behavioral design offers a new solution. Iris Bohnet shows that by de-biasing organizations instead of individuals, we can make smart changes that have big impacts--often at low cost and high speed.
    Courageous Conversations about Race: A Field Guide for Achieving Equity in Schools.
    Singleton, Glenn E. Courageous Conversations about Race: A Field Guide for Achieving Equity in Schools.. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, 2006. View the BookAbstract
    Singleton looks at the achievement gap through the prism of race, and in "Courageous Conversations About Race", he begins by examining the evidence that points to race - not poverty - as the underlying cause behind the achievement gap. This work, while exploring how race affects all educators, declares that we need to have engaged, sustained, and deep conversations about race in order to understand students and the achievement gap. Singleton calls this process "courageous conversations." Through these "courageous conversations," educators can learn how to redesign curriculum and create community and true equity. Action steps to close the achievement gap include creating an equity team and collaborative action research. The final chapter presents a system wide plan for transforming schools and districts, including activities, exercises, and checklists for central office administrators, principals, and teachers.
    Occupying the Academy: Just How Important Is Diversity Work in Higher Education?
    Clark, Christine, Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, and Mark Brimhall-Vargas, ed. Occupying the Academy: Just How Important Is Diversity Work in Higher Education?. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    This book looks courageously at diversity in higher education through critical, social justice-oriented theoretical lenses. The strength of this edited volume rests in the various case studies as told from the perspective of academic leaders specifically employed as chief diversity officers, mid-level administrators, and faculty members. These case studies uncover the persistent challenges of racism in higher education.
    Charleston Syllabus: Readings on Race, Racism, and Racial Violence
    Williams, Chad, Kidada E Williams, and Keisha N. Blain, ed. Charleston Syllabus: Readings on Race, Racism, and Racial Violence , 2016. View the BookAbstract
    "Charleston Syllabus is a reader-a collection of new essays and columns published in the wake of the massacre, along with selected excerpts from key existing scholarly books and general-interest articles. The collection draws from a variety of disciplines-history, sociology, urban studies, law, critical race theory-and includes discussion questions and a selected and annotated bibliography for further reading, drawing from such texts as the confederate constitution, South Carolina's secession declaration, songs, poetry, slave narratives, and literacy texts. As timely as it is necessary, the book will be a valuable resource for understanding the roots of American systemic racism, white privilege, the uses and abuses of the Confederate flag and its ideals, the black church as a foundation for civil rights activity and state violence against such activity, and critical whiteness studies."- provided by the publisher.
    Heavy
    Laymon, Kiese. Heavy. New York: Scribner, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

    Kiese Laymon writes eloquently and honestly about growing up a hard-headed Black son to a complicated and brilliant Black mother in Jackson, Mississippi. By attempting to name secrets and lies he and his mother spent a lifetime avoiding, he asks us to confront the terrifying possibility that few in this nation actually know how to responsibly love, and even fewer want to live under the weight of actually becoming free.

    Find the Print Book in HOLLIS

    Safe Enough to Soar: Accelerating Trust, Inclusion, and Collaboration in the Workplace
    Miller, Frederick A. Safe Enough to Soar: Accelerating Trust, Inclusion, and Collaboration in the Workplace. Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    This book introduces the concept of “interaction safety” and demonstrate how it can help create a work environment of trust, inclusion, and collaboration. It provides a four-level model for assessing and increasing the interaction safety in organizations, illustrated by short scenarios taken from real-life situations, and offers concrete actions team members, leaders, and organizations can take to build and maintain a productive, collaborative, and innovative environment.
    Latino Urbanism: The Politics of Planning, Policy and Redevelopment
    Torres, Rodolfo D., and David R. Diaz, ed. Latino Urbanism: The Politics of Planning, Policy and Redevelopment. Democracy and urban landscapes. New York: New York University Press, 2012. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
    The nation's Latina/o population has now reached over 50 million, or 15% of the estimated total U.S. population of 300 million, and a growing portion of the world's population now lives and works in cities that are increasingly diverse. Latino Urbanism provides the first national perspective on Latina/o urban policy, addressing a wide range of planning policy issues that impact both Latinas/os in the US, as well as the nation as a whole, tracing how cities develop, function, and are affected by socio-economic change. The contributors are a diverse group of Latina/o scholars attempting to lin
    Dictionary of Latino Civil Rights History
    Rosales, Arturo, ed. Dictionary of Latino Civil Rights History. Hispanic Civil Rights Series. Houston: Arte Publico Press, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
    From the Alianza Hispano-Americana, a mutual aid society founded in Tucson, Arizona in 1894, to the Zoot Suit Riots in Los Angeles in 1943, this first-ever dictionary of important issues in the U.S. Latino struggle for civil rights defines a wide-ranging list of key terms. With over 922 entries on significant events, figures, laws, and other historical items, this ground-breaking reference work covers the fight for equality from the mid-nineteenth century to the present by the various Hispanic groups in the U.S. Rosales chronicles such landmark events as the development of farm worker unions and immigrant rights groups to the forces behind bilingual-bicultural education, feminist activities, and protests over discrimination, segregation, and police brutality. In this volume, he provides a comprehensive look at the history of the Latino civil rights movement. In addition to covering all of the major events in labor, politics, land reclamation, and education, this pioneering work includes never-before-published biographies of the major players in the history of America's largest minority group. An array of historical photos and entries outline the activities of all Hispanic populations in the United States, including citizens and immigrants, men and women. A complete subject index, timeline, and bibliographic documentation complement this definitive reference work compiled by the most respected authority on Latino civil rights.
    Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America
    Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo. Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
    Eduardo Bonilla-Silva's acclaimed Racism without Racists is a provocative book that explodes the belief that America is now a color-blind society. The fifth edition includes a new chapter addressing what readers can do to confront racism, new material on the racial climate post-Obama, new coverage of the Black Lives Matter movement, and more.
    Between the World and Me
    Coates, Ta-Nehisi. Between the World and Me. New York: Spiegel & Grau, 2015. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

    "In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of "race," a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men–bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates's attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son–and readers–the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children's lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward."–Publisher's description. 

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    Rethinking Racial Justice
    Valls, Andrew. Rethinking Racial Justice. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018. View the e-book (Harvard Key required)Abstract
    The racial injustice that continues to plague the United States couldn't be a clearer challenge to the country's idea of itself as a liberal and democratic society, where all citizens have a chance at a decent life. So what must a liberal society do to address the legacies of its past, and how should we aim to reconceive liberalism in order to do so? In this work, Andrew Valls takes issue with solutions from both the left and the right, and therefore with the constricted ways in which racial justice is debated in the United States today.

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