Publications

    Campus Counterspaces: Black and Latinx Students' Search for Community at Historically White Universities
    Keels, Micere. Campus Counterspaces: Black and Latinx Students' Search for Community at Historically White Universities. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

    Frustrated with the flood of news articles and opinion pieces that were skeptical of minority students' "imagined" campus microaggressions, Micere Keels, a professor of comparative human development, set out to provide a detailed account of how racial-ethnic identity structures Black and Latinx students' college transition experiences.

    Tracking a cohort of more than five hundred Black and Latinx students since they enrolled at five historically white colleges and universities in the fall of 2013, Campus Counterspaces finds that these students were not asking to be protected from new ideas. Instead, they relished exposure to new ideas, wanted to be intellectually challenged, and wanted to grow. However, Keels argues, they were asking for access to counterspaces-safe spaces that enable radical growth. They wanted counterspaces where they could go beyond basic conversations about whether racism and discrimination still exist. They wanted time in counterspaces with likeminded others where they could simultaneously validate and challenge stereotypical representations of their marginalized identities and develop new counter narratives of those identities.

    In this critique of how universities have responded to the challenges these students face, Keels offers a way forward that goes beyond making diversity statements to taking diversity actions.

    Never Caught : The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge
    Dunbar, Erica Armstrong. Never Caught : The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge. New York: 37 Ink/Atria Books, 2017. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

    "A startling and eye-opening look into America's First Family, Never Caught is the powerful story about a daring woman of "extraordinary grit" (The Philadelphia Inquirer). When George Washington was elected president, he reluctantly left behind his beloved Mount Vernon to serve in Philadelphia, the temporary seat of the nation's capital. In setting up his household he brought along nine slaves, including Ona Judge. As the President grew accustomed to Northern ways, there was one change he couldn't abide: Pennsylvania law required enslaved people be set free after six months of residency in the state. Rather than comply, Washington decided to circumvent the law. Every six months he sent the slaves back down south just as the clock was about to expire. Though Ona Judge lived a life of relative comfort, she was denied freedom. So, when the opportunity presented itself one clear and pleasant spring day in Philadelphia, Judge left everything she knew to escape to New England. Yet freedom would not come without its costs. At just twenty-two-years-old, Ona became the subject of an intense manhunt led by George Washington, who used his political and personal contacts to recapture his property. "

    A crisp and compulsively readable feat of research and storytelling" (USA TODAY), historian and National Book Award finalist Erica Armstrong Dunbar weaves a powerful tale and offers fascinating new scholarship on how one young woman risked everything to gain freedom from the famous founding father. -Publisher's Description

    White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
    Anderson, Carol. White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide. New York: Bloomsbury, 2016. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
    From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America. Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, White Rage will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.
    Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture
    Morales, Ed. Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture. London ; Brooklyn, N.Y. Verso, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    The Latinx revolution in US culture, society, and politics. Latinx is the gender-neutral term that covers the largest racial minority in the United States, 17 percent of the country. In this groundbreaking discussion, Ed Morales explains how Latin political identities are tied to a long Latin American history of mestizaje, translatable as "mixedness" or "hybridity", and that this border thinking is both a key to understanding bilingual, bicultural Latin cultures and politics and a challenge to America's infamously black/white racial regime..
    Civil rights and beyond: African American and Latino/a activism in the twentieth-century United States
    Behnken, Brian D., ed. Civil rights and beyond: African American and Latino/a activism in the twentieth-century United States. Athens: The University of Georgia Press, 2016. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
    Civil Rights and Beyond examines the dynamic relationships between African American and Latino/a activists in the United States from the 1930s to the present day. Building on recent scholarship, this book pushes the timeframe for the study of interactions between blacks and a variety of Latino/a groups beyond the standard chronology of the civil rights era. As such, the book merges a host of community histories–each with their own distinct historical experiences and activisms–to explore group dynamics, differing strategies and activist moments, and the broader quests of these communities for rights and social justice. The collection is framed around the concept of “activism,” which most fully encompasses the relationships that blacks and Latinos have enjoyed throughout the twentieth century. Wide ranging and pioneering, Civil Rights and Beyond explores black and Latino/a activism from California to Florida, Chicago to Bakersfield–and a host of other communities and cities–to demonstrate the complicated nature of African American-Latino/a activism in the twentieth-century United States.–Publisher website.
    Growing up Muslim in Europe and the United States
    Bozorgmehr, Mehdi, and Phillip Kasinitz, ed. Growing up Muslim in Europe and the United States. New York: Routledge, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    This volume brings together scholarship from two different, and until now, largely separate literatures--the study of the children of immigrants and the study of Muslim minority communities--in order to explore the changing nature of ethnic identity, religious practice, and citizenship in the contemporary western world. With attention to the similarities and differences between the European and American experiences of growing up Muslim, the contributing authors ask what it means for young people to be both Muslim and American or European, how they reconcile these, at times, conflicting identities, how they reconcile the religious and gendered cultural norms of their immigrant families with the more liberal ideals of the western societies that they live in, and how they deal with these issues through mobilization and political incorporation. A transatlantic research effort that brings together work from the tradition in diaspora studies with research on the second generation, to examine social, cultural, and political dimensions of the second-generation Muslim experience in Europe and the United States, this book will appeal to scholars across the social sciences with interests in migration, diaspora, race and ethnicity, religion and integration.
    Disability and Employer Practices: Research Across the Disciplines
    Bruyère, Susanne M., ed. Disability and Employer Practices: Research Across the Disciplines. Ithica: Cornell University Press, 2016. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    Disability and Employer Practices features research-based documentation of workplace policies and practices that result in the successful recruitment, retention, advancement, and inclusion of individuals with disabilities.The Cornell team whose work is featured in this book drew from multiple disciplines, data sources, and methodologies to learn where employment disparities for people with disabilities occur and to identify workplace policies and practices that might remediate them.
    Teaching about Race and Racism in the College Classroom : Notes from a White Professor
    Kernahan, Cyndi. Teaching about Race and Racism in the College Classroom : Notes from a White Professor. Morgantown, WV: West Virginia University Press, 2019. View the Ebook- Harvard Key requiredAbstract

    Teaching about race and racism can be a difficult business. Students and instructors alike often struggle with strong emotions, and many people have robust preexisting beliefs about race. At the same time, this is a moment that demands a clear understanding of racism. It is important for students to learn how we got here and how racism is more than just individual acts of meanness. Students also need to understand that colorblindness is not an effective anti-racism strategy.

    In this book, Cyndi Kernahan argues that you can be honest and unflinching in your teaching about racism while also providing a compassionate learning environment that allows for mistakes and avoids shaming students. She provides evidence for how learning works with respect to race and racism along with practical teaching strategies rooted in that evidence to help instructors feel more confident. She also differentiates between how white students and students of color are likely to experience the classroom, helping instructors provide a more effective learning experience for all students.-Provided by Publisher

    Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive
    Serano, Julia. Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive. Berkeley, CA: Seal Press, 2013. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
    Among LGBTQ activists, there is a long history of lesbians and gay men dismissing bisexuals, transgender people, and other gender and sexual minorities. In each case, exclusion is based on the premise that certain ways of being gendered or sexual are more legitimate, natural, or righteous than others. In Excluded, Julia Serano chronicles many of these instances of exclusion and argues that marginalizing others often stems from a handful of assumptions that are routinely made about gender and sexuality.
    From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation
    Taylor, Keeanga-Yamahtta. From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation. Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2016. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

    "Activist and scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and persistence of structural inequality such as mass incarceration and Black unemployment. In this context, she argues that this new struggle against police violence holds the potential to reignite a broader push for Black liberation"--Front flap.

    Print Book Also Available (HOLLIS #990145227100203941)

    Whitewashed: America's Invisible Middle Eastern Minority
    Tehranian, John. Whitewashed: America's Invisible Middle Eastern Minority. New York: New York University Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
    Focusing on the contemporary immigration debate, the war on terrorism, media portrayals of Middle Easterners, and the processes of creating racial stereo-types, John Tehranian argues that, despite its many successes, the modern civil rights movement has not done enough to protect the liberties of Middle Eastern Americans, By following how concepts of whiteness have transformed over time, Whitewashed forces readers to rethink and question some of their most deeply held assumptions about race in American society.
    The Nonreligious: Understanding Secular People and Societies
    Zuckerman, Phil, Luke W. Galen, and Frank L. Pasquale. The Nonreligious: Understanding Secular People and Societies. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. View the eBookAbstract
    Tis book is an empirically based, research-based, data-based overview of the social science of secularity. More and more social scientists have begun taking secularity seriously as a subject of study in its own right, and conceptual as well as empirical research on the nonreligious within sociology, psychology, and anthropology has been rapidly increasing and diversifying in recent years.
    Learning to Be Latino: How Colleges Shape Identity Politics
    Verduzco Reyes, Daisy. Learning to Be Latino: How Colleges Shape Identity Politics. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

    In Learning to Be Latino, sociologist Daisy Verduzco Reyes paints a vivid picture of Latino student life at a liberal arts college, a research university, and a regional public university, outlining students’ interactions with one another, with non-Latino peers, and with faculty, administrators, and the outside community. Reyes identifies the normative institutional arrangements that shape the social relationships relevant to Latino students’ lives, including school size, the demographic profile of the student body, residential arrangements, the relationship between students and administrators, and how well diversity programs integrate students through cultural centers and retention centers. Together these characteristics create an environment for Latino students that influences how they interact, identify, and come to understand their place on campus.
     
    Drawing on extensive ethnographic observations, Reyes shows how college campuses shape much more than students’ academic and occupational trajectories; they mold students’ ideas about inequality and opportunity in America, their identities, and even how they intend to practice politics.  

    The Emperor Has No Clothes: Teaching About Race and Racism to People Who Don't Want to Know
    Okun, Tema. The Emperor Has No Clothes: Teaching About Race and Racism to People Who Don't Want to Know. Educational leadership for social justice. Charlotte, N.C. Information Age Publishing, 2010. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
    "The Emperor Has No Clothes: Teaching About Race and Racism to People Who Don’t Want to Know offers theoretical grounding and practical approaches for leaders and teachers interested in effectively addressing racism and other oppressive constructs. The book draws both on the author’s extensive experience teaching about race and racism in classroom and community settings and from the theory and practice of a wide range of educators, activists, and researchers committed to social justice.

    The first chapter looks at the toxic consequences of our western cultural insistence on profit, binary thinking, and individualism to establish the theoretical framework for teaching about race and racism. Chapter two investigates privileged resistance, offering a psycho/social history of denial, particularly as a product of racist culture. Chapter three reviews the research on the construction and reconstruction of dominant culture both historically and now in order to establish sound strategic approaches that educators, teachers, facilitators, and activists can take as we work together to move from a culture of profit and fear to one of shared hope and love. Chapter four lays out the stages of a process that supports teaching about racist, white supremacy culture, explaining how students can be taken through an iterative process of relationshipbuilding, analysis, planning, action, and reflection. The final chapter borrows from the brilliant, brave, and incisive writer Dorothy Allison to discuss the things the author knows for sure about how to teach people to see that which we have been conditioned to fear knowing. The chapter concludes with how to encourage and support collective and collaborative action as a critical goal of the process." - from Publisher's Site
     
    The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students
    Jack, Anthony Abraham. The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

    Getting in is only half the battle. The Privileged Poor reveals how-and why-disadvantaged students struggle at elite colleges, and explains what schools can do differently if these students are to thrive.The Ivy League looks different than it used to. College presidents and deans of admission have opened their doors-and their coffers-to support a more diverse student body. But is it enough just to admit these students? In The Privileged Poor, Anthony Jack reveals that the struggles of less privileged students continue long after they've arrived on campus. Admission, they quickly learn, is not the same as acceptance. This bracing and necessary book documents how university policies and cultures can exacerbate preexisting inequalities and reveals why these policies hit some students harder than others.Despite their lofty aspirations, top colleges hedge their bets by recruiting their new diversity largely from the same old sources, admitting scores of lower-income black, Latino, and white undergraduates from elite private high schools like Exeter and Andover. These students approach campus life very differently from students who attended local, and typically troubled, public high schools and are often left to flounder on their own. Drawing on interviews with dozens of undergraduates at one of America's most famous colleges and on his own experiences as one of the privileged poor, Jack describes the lives poor students bring with them and shows how powerfully background affects their chances of success.If we truly want our top colleges to be engines of opportunity, university policies and campus cultures will have to change. Jack provides concrete advice to help schools reduce these hidden disadvantages-advice we cannot afford to ignore.

    Also available as print book (HOLLIS# 99153735717903941)

    Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation
    Clare, Eli. Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation. Cambridge, MA: South End Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
     
    Muslims, Identity, and American Politics
    Calfano, Brian Robert. Muslims, Identity, and American Politics. Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge, 2018. View the BookAbstract
    An examination of the pressures faced by Muslims, often considered political and social outsiders in western nations. Though citizens and second generation residents in many cases, American Muslims face a combination of suspicion, government scrutiny, and social segregation in the United States. The book examines how group influence, emotions, and religious interpretation contribute to the political orientation and behaviour of a national sample of Muslims living in the American context. A compelling explanation of how members of an ostracized political group marshal the motivation to become fully engaged political actors.
    Teaching Race: How to Help Students Unmask and Challenge Racism
    Brookfield, Stephen. Teaching Race: How to Help Students Unmask and Challenge Racism. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
    A real-world how-to manual for talking about race in the classroom Educators and activists frequently call for the need to address the lingering presence of racism in higher education. Yet few books offer specific suggestions and advice on how to introduce race to students who believe we live in a post-racial world where racism is no longer a real issue. In Teaching Race the authors offer practical tools and techniques for teaching and discussing racial issues at predominately White institutions of higher education. 

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