The Bookshelf

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Inclusive Leadership: Negotiating Gendered Spaces
Adapa, Sujana, and Alison Sheridan, ed. Inclusive Leadership: Negotiating Gendered Spaces. Palgrave studies in leadership and followership. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018. View the BookAbstract
Examining perceptions of leaders which are dependent on social and cultural contexts, this edited collection argues that in order to thrive and to understand the future business landscape, leaders must be inclusive and create followership. Addressing the under-representation of women in leadership roles, contributions explore inclusivity and exclusivity in leading organisations, the politics of gendered differences and the value of leader-follower dynamics.
Race: The Power of an Illusion
Adelman, Larry. Race: The Power of an Illusion. California Newsreel, 2003. View the Film-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Race: The Power of an Illusion is a three-part documentary series produced by California Newsreel that investigates the idea of race in society, science and history. The educational documentary originally screened on American public television and was primarily funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Ford Foundation and PBS.
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
Alexander, Michelle. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. Rev. ed. New York: New Press ; Distributed by Perseus Distribution, 2012. View the BookAbstract
A stunning account of the rebirth of a caste-like system in the United States, one that has resulted in millions of African Americans locked behind bars and then relegated to a permanent second-class status—denied the very rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights Movement.
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Tangerine
Baker, Sean. Tangerine. Magnolia Home Entertainment, 2015. View the FilmAbstract
It's Christmas Eve in Tinseltown and Sin-Dee is back on the block. Upon hearing that her pimp boyfriend hasn't been faithful during the 28 days she was locked up, the working girl and her best friend, Alexandra, embark on a mission to get to the bottom of the scandalous rumor. Their rip-roaring odyssey leads them through various subcultures of Los Angeles.
Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People
Banaji, Mahzarin R., and Anthony G. Greenwald. Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People. 1st ed. New York: Delacorte Press, 2013. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
The authors explore hidden biases that we all carry from a lifetime of experiences with social groups – age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, social class, sexuality, disability status, or nationality.
From Oppression to Grace: Women of Color and Their Dilemmas within the Academy
Berry, Theodorea Regina, and Nathalie Mizelle, ed. From Oppression to Grace: Women of Color and Their Dilemmas within the Academy. Herndon, United States: Stylus Publishing, 2011. Publisher's VersionAbstract
This book gives voice to the experiences of women of color–women of African, Native American, Latina, East Indian, Korean and Japanese descent–as students pursuing terminal degrees and as faculty members navigating the Academy, grappling with the dilemmas encountered by others and themselves as they exist at the intersections of their work and identities. This book uses critical race feminism (CRF) to place women of color in the center, rather than the margins, of the discussion, theorizing, research and praxis of their lives as they co-exist in the dominant culture. The first part of the book addresses the issues faced on the way to achieving a terminal degree: the struggles encountered and the lessons learned along the way. Part Two, "Pride and Prejudice: Finding Your Place After the Degree" describes the complexity of lives of women with multiple identities as scholars with family, friends, and lives at home and at work. The book concludes with the voices of senior faculty sharing their journeys and their paths to growth as scholars and individuals. 
What Works: Gender Equality by Design
Bohnet, Iris. What Works: Gender Equality by Design. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016. View the BookAbstract
Gender equality is a moral and a business imperative. But unconscious bias holds us back and de-biasing minds has proven to be difficult and expensive. Behavioral design offers a new solution. Iris Bohnet shows that by de-biasing organizations instead of individuals, we can make smart changes that have big impacts--often at low cost and high speed.
Growing up Muslim in Europe and the United States
Bozorgmehr, Mehdi, and Phillip Kasinitz, ed. Growing up Muslim in Europe and the United States. New York: Routledge, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This volume brings together scholarship from two different, and until now, largely separate literatures--the study of the children of immigrants and the study of Muslim minority communities--in order to explore the changing nature of ethnic identity, religious practice, and citizenship in the contemporary western world. With attention to the similarities and differences between the European and American experiences of growing up Muslim, the contributing authors ask what it means for young people to be both Muslim and American or European, how they reconcile these, at times, conflicting identities, how they reconcile the religious and gendered cultural norms of their immigrant families with the more liberal ideals of the western societies that they live in, and how they deal with these issues through mobilization and political incorporation. A transatlantic research effort that brings together work from the tradition in diaspora studies with research on the second generation, to examine social, cultural, and political dimensions of the second-generation Muslim experience in Europe and the United States, this book will appeal to scholars across the social sciences with interests in migration, diaspora, race and ethnicity, religion and integration.
Teaching for Critical Thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question Their Assumptions
Brookfield, Stephen. Teaching for Critical Thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question Their Assumptions. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2012. View the BookAbstract
Stephen Brookfield builds on his last three decades of experience running workshops and teaching courses on critical thinking to explore how student learn to think this way, and what teachers can do the help students develop this capacity. He outlines a basic protocol of critical thinking as a learning process that focuses on uncovering and checking assumptions, exploring alternative perspectives, and taking informed actions as a result.
Disability and Employer Practices: Research Across the Disciplines
Bruyère, Susanne M., ed. Disability and Employer Practices: Research Across the Disciplines. Ithica: Cornell University Press, 2016. View the BookAbstract
Disability and Employer Practices features research-based documentation of workplace policies and practices that result in the successful recruitment, retention, advancement, and inclusion of individuals with disabilities.The Cornell team whose work is featured in this book drew from multiple disciplines, data sources, and methodologies to learn where employment disparities for people with disabilities occur and to identify workplace policies and practices that might remediate them.
The Best We Could Do: An Illustrated Memoir
Bui, Thi. The Best We Could Do: An Illustrated Memoir. New York: Abrams Comicarts, 2017. View the BookAbstract
The author describes her experiences as a young Vietnamese immigrant, highlighting her family's move from their war-torn home to the United States in graphic novel format.
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Muslims, Identity, and American Politics
Calfano, Brian Robert. Muslims, Identity, and American Politics. Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge, 2018. View the BookAbstract
An examination of the pressures faced by Muslims, often considered political and social outsiders in western nations. Though citizens and second generation residents in many cases, American Muslims face a combination of suspicion, government scrutiny, and social segregation in the United States. The book examines how group influence, emotions, and religious interpretation contribute to the political orientation and behaviour of a national sample of Muslims living in the American context. A compelling explanation of how members of an ostracized political group marshal the motivation to become fully engaged political actors.
Borders of Belonging: Struggle and Solidarity in Mixed-Status Immigrant Families
Castañeda, Heide. Borders of Belonging: Struggle and Solidarity in Mixed-Status Immigrant Families. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2019. View the BookAbstract
Borders of Belonging investigates a pressing but previously unexplored aspect of immigration in America―the impact of immigration policies and practices not only on undocumented migrants, but also on their family members, some of whom possess a form of legal status.
Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation
Clare, Eli. Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation. Cambridge, MA: South End Press, 2009. View the BookAbstract
 
Occupying the Academy: Just How Important Is Diversity Work in Higher Education?
Clark, Christine, Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, and Mark Brimhall-Vargas, ed. Occupying the Academy: Just How Important Is Diversity Work in Higher Education?. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This book looks courageously at diversity in higher education through critical, social justice-oriented theoretical lenses. The strength of this edited volume rests in the various case studies as told from the perspective of academic leaders specifically employed as Chief Diversity Officers, Mid-Level Administrators, and faculty members. These case studies uncover the persistent challenges of racism in higher education.
Between the World and Me
Coates, Ta-Nehisi. Between the World and Me. 1st ed. New York: Spiegel & Grau, 2015. View the BookAbstract
In a profound work, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation’s history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of “race,” a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men—bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates’s attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son.
Fruitvale Station
Coogler, Ryan. Fruitvale Station. Weinstein Company, 2013. View the FilmAbstract
Fruitvale Station is a 2013 American biographical drama film written and directed by Ryan Coogler. It is Coogler's first feature-length film and is based on the events leading to the death of Oscar Grant, an African American young man who was killed in 2009 by BART police officer Johannes Mehserle at the Fruitvale district station of the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system in Oakland.
Black Panther
Coogler, Ryan. Black Panther. Buena Vista Home Entertainment, 2018. View the FilmAbstract
King T'Challa returns home to the isolated, technologically advanced African nation of Wakanda to serve as new leader. However, T'Challa soon finds that he is challenged for the throne from divisions within his own country. When two enemies conspire to destroy Wakanda, the hero known as Black Panther must join forces with C.I.A. agent Everett K. Ross and members of the Wakandan Special Forces, to prevent Wakanda from being drawn into a world war.
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The Color of Mind: Why the Origins of the Achievement Gap Matter for Justice
Darby, Derrick, and John L. Rury. The Color of Mind: Why the Origins of the Achievement Gap Matter for Justice. History and philosophy of education. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
Rejecting the view that racial differences in educational achievement are a product of innate or cultural differences, Darby and Rury uncover the historical interplay between ideas about race and American schooling, to show clearly that the racial achievement gap has been socially and institutionally constructed.
Daughters of the Dust
Dash, Julie. Daughters of the Dust. Kino Video, 2000. View the FilmAbstract
Daughters of the Dust is a 1991 independent film written, directed and produced by Julie Dash and is the first feature film directed by an African-American woman distributed theatrically in the United States. Set in 1902, it tells the story of three generations of Gullah (also known as Geechee) women in the Peazant family on Saint Helena Island as they prepare to migrate to the North on the mainland.

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