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Confronting Equity Issues on Campus: Implementing the Equity Scorecard in Theory and Practice
Malcom-Piqueux, Lindsey E., and Estela Mara Bensimon, ed. Confronting Equity Issues on Campus: Implementing the Equity Scorecard in Theory and Practice. Sterling, Va. Stylus, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Drawing on the theory of action research, the Equity Scorecard creates a structure for practitioners to become investigators of their own institutional culture, to become aware of racial disparities, confront their own practices and learn how things are done on their own turf to ask: In what ways am I contributing to equity/inequity?
Safe Enough to Soar: Accelerating Trust, Inclusion, and Collaboration in the Workplace
Miller, Frederick A. Safe Enough to Soar: Accelerating Trust, Inclusion, and Collaboration in the Workplace. Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This book introduces the concept of “interaction safety” and demonstrate how it can help create a work environment of trust, inclusion, and collaboration. It provides a four-level model for assessing and increasing the interaction safety in organizations, illustrated by short scenarios taken from real-life situations, and offers concrete actions team members, leaders, and organizations can take to build and maintain a productive, collaborative, and innovative environment.
Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism
Minh-Ha, Trinh T. Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism. Bloomington, IN. Indiana University Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This book is located at the juncture of a number of different fields and disciplines, and it genuinely succeeds in pushing the boundaries of these disciplines further. It is one of the very few theoretical attempts to grapple with the writings of women of color.
Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More
Mock, Janet. Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More. New York: Atria Books, 2014. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
With unflinching honesty and moving prose, Janet Mock relays her experiences of growing up young, multiracial, poor, and trans in America, offering readers accessible language while imparting vital insight about the unique challenges and vulnerabilities of a marginalized and misunderstood population.
Grateful Nation: Student Veterans and the Rise of the "Military-Friendly" Campus
Moore, Ellen. Grateful Nation: Student Veterans and the Rise of the "Military-Friendly" Campus. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2017. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
In today's volunteer military many recruits enlist for the educational benefits, yet a significant number of veterans struggle in the classroom, and many drop out. The difficulties faced by student veterans have been attributed to various factors: poor academic preparation, PTSD and other postwar ailments, and allegedly antimilitary sentiments on college campuses. In Grateful Nation Ellen Moore challenges these narratives by tracing the experiences of Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans at two California college campuses. Drawing on interviews with dozens of veterans, classroom observations, and assessments of the work of veteran support organizations, Moore finds that veterans' academic struggles result from their military training and combat experience, which complicate their ability to function in civilian schools. While there is little evidence of antimilitary bias on college campuses, Moore demonstrates the ways in which college programs that conflate support for veterans with support for the institutional military lead to suppression of campus debate about the wars, discourage antiwar activism, and encourage a growing militarization.
Meet Me Halfway: Milwaukee Stories.
Morales, Jennifer. Meet Me Halfway: Milwaukee Stories.. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2015. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
When Johnquell, an African American teen, suffers a serious accident in the home of his white neighbor, Mrs. Czernicki, his community must find ways to bridge divisions between black and white, gay and straight, old and young. Set in one of the nation’s most highly segregated cities—Milwaukee, Wisconsin—Meet Me Halfway tells stories of connections in a community with a tumultuous and divided past. In nine stories told from diverse perspectives, Jennifer Morales captures a Rust Belt city’s struggle to establish a common ground and a collective vision of the future.

Morales gives life to multifaceted characters—white schoolteachers and senior citizens, Latino landlords, black and Puerto Rican teens, political activists, and Vietnam vets. As their lives unfold in these stories, we learn about Johnquell’s family—his grandparents’ involvement in the local Black Panther Party, his sister’s on-again, off-again friendship with a white classmate, and his aunt’s identity crisis as she finds herself falling in love with a woman. We also meet Johnquell’s mother, Gloria, and his school friend Taquan, who is struggling to chart his own future.

As an activist mother in the thick of Milwaukee politics, Morales developed a keen ear and a tender heart for the kids who have inherited the city’s troubled racial legacy. With a critical eye on promises unfulfilled, Meet Me Halfway raises questions about the notion of a “postracial” society and, with humor and compassion, lifts up the day-to-day work needed to get there.
The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America
Muhammad, Khalil Gibran. The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America. Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 2010. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

The Idea of Black criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America. Khalil Gibran Muhammad chronicles how, when, and why modern notions of black people as an exceptionally dangerous race of criminals first emerged. Well known are the lynch mobs and racist criminal justice practices in the South that stoked white fears of black crime and shaped the contours of the New South. In this illuminating book, Muhammad shifts our attention to the urban North as a crucial but overlooked site for the production and dissemination of those ideas and practices. Following the 1890 census - the first to measure the generation of African Americans born after slavery - crime statistics, new migration and immigration trends, and symbolic references to America as the promised land were woven into a cautionary tale about the exceptional threat black people posed to modern urban society. Excessive arrest rates and overrepresentation in northern prisons were seen by many whites - liberals and conservatives, northerners and southerners - as indisputable proof of blacks' inferiority. What else but pathology could explain black failure in the land of opportunity? Social scientists and reformers used crime statistics to mask and excuse anti-black racism, violence, and discrimination across the nation, especially in the urban North. The Condemnation of Blackness is the most thorough historical account of the enduring link between blackness and criminality in the making of modern urban America. It is a startling examination of why the echoes of America's Jim Crow past continue to resonate in 'color-blind' crime rhetoric today.

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What Is an American Muslim?: Embracing Faith and Citizenship
Naʻīm, ʻAbd Allāh Aḥmad. What Is an American Muslim?: Embracing Faith and Citizenship. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This title offers a pioneering exploration of American Muslim citizenship and identity, arguing against the prevalent emphasis on majority-minority politics and instead promoting a shared citizenship that both accommodates and transcends religious identity.
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The Emperor Has No Clothes: Teaching About Race and Racism to People Who Don't Want to Know
Okun, Tema. The Emperor Has No Clothes: Teaching About Race and Racism to People Who Don't Want to Know. Educational leadership for social justice. Charlotte, N.C. Information Age Publishing, 2010. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
"The Emperor Has No Clothes: Teaching About Race and Racism to People Who Don’t Want to Know offers theoretical grounding and practical approaches for leaders and teachers interested in effectively addressing racism and other oppressive constructs. The book draws both on the author’s extensive experience teaching about race and racism in classroom and community settings and from the theory and practice of a wide range of educators, activists, and researchers committed to social justice.

The first chapter looks at the toxic consequences of our western cultural insistence on profit, binary thinking, and individualism to establish the theoretical framework for teaching about race and racism. Chapter two investigates privileged resistance, offering a psycho/social history of denial, particularly as a product of racist culture. Chapter three reviews the research on the construction and reconstruction of dominant culture both historically and now in order to establish sound strategic approaches that educators, teachers, facilitators, and activists can take as we work together to move from a culture of profit and fear to one of shared hope and love. Chapter four lays out the stages of a process that supports teaching about racist, white supremacy culture, explaining how students can be taken through an iterative process of relationshipbuilding, analysis, planning, action, and reflection. The final chapter borrows from the brilliant, brave, and incisive writer Dorothy Allison to discuss the things the author knows for sure about how to teach people to see that which we have been conditioned to fear knowing. The chapter concludes with how to encourage and support collective and collaborative action as a critical goal of the process." - from Publisher's Site
 
Veterans' Policies, Veterans' Politics: New Perspectives on Veterans in the Modern United States
Ortiz, Stephen R., ed. Veterans' Policies, Veterans' Politics: New Perspectives on Veterans in the Modern United States. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
Veterans' Policies, Veterans' Politics is the first multidisciplinary, comprehensive examination of the American veteran experience. Stephen Ortiz has compiled some of the best work on the formation and impact of veterans' policies, the politics of veterans' issues, and veterans' political engagement over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in the United States.
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Jewish Peoplehood: An American Innovation
Pianko, Noam. Jewish Peoplehood: An American Innovation. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2015. View the eBookAbstract
Although fewer American Jews today describe themselves as religious, they overwhelmingly report a strong sense of belonging to the Jewish people. Indeed, Jewish peoplehood has eclipsed religion—as well as ethnicity and nationality—as the essence of what binds Jews around the globe to one another. In Jewish Peoplehood, Noam Pianko highlights the current significance and future relevance of “peoplehood” by tracing the rise, transformation, and return of this novel term. 
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Dictionary of Latino Civil Rights History
Rosales, Arturo, ed. Dictionary of Latino Civil Rights History. Hispanic Civil Rights Series. Houston: Arte Publico Press, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
From the Alianza Hispano-Americana, a mutual aid society founded in Tucson, Arizona in 1894, to the Zoot Suit Riots in Los Angeles in 1943, this first-ever dictionary of important issues in the U.S. Latino struggle for civil rights defines a wide-ranging list of key terms. With over 922 entries on significant events, figures, laws, and other historical items, this ground-breaking reference work covers the fight for equality from the mid-nineteenth century to the present by the various Hispanic groups in the U.S. Rosales chronicles such landmark events as the development of farm worker unions and immigrant rights groups to the forces behind bilingual-bicultural education, feminist activities, and protests over discrimination, segregation, and police brutality. In this volume, he provides a comprehensive look at the history of the Latino civil rights movement. In addition to covering all of the major events in labor, politics, land reclamation, and education, this pioneering work includes never-before-published biographies of the major players in the history of America's largest minority group. An array of historical photos and entries outline the activities of all Hispanic populations in the United States, including citizens and immigrants, men and women. A complete subject index, timeline, and bibliographic documentation complement this definitive reference work compiled by the most respected authority on Latino civil rights.
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People with Disabilities: Sidelined or Mainstreamed?
Schur, Lisa. People with Disabilities: Sidelined or Mainstreamed?. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2013. View the BookAbstract
This book provides an overview of the progress and continuing disparities faced by people with disabilities around the world, reviewing hundreds of studies and presenting new evidence from analysis of surveys and interviews with disability leaders. It shows the connections among economic, political and social inclusion, and how the experience of disability can vary by gender, race and ethnicity. It uses a multidisciplinary approach, drawing on theoretical models and research in economics, political science, psychology, disability studies, law and sociology.
Deep Roots : How Slavery Still Shapes Southern Politics
Sen, Maya, Avidit Acharya, and Matthew Blackwell. Deep Roots : How Slavery Still Shapes Southern Politics. Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

While legislation such as the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act made huge strides in increasing economic opportunity and reducing educational disparities, southern slavery has had a profound, lasting, and self-reinforcing influence on regional and national politics that can still be felt today in the South.

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Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity
Serano, Julia. Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity. Second edition. Emeryville, CA: Seal Press, 2007. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
In the updated second edition of Whipping Girl, Julia Serano, a transsexual woman whose supremely intelligent writing reflects her diverse background as a lesbian transgender activist and professional biologist, shares her powerful experiences and observations—both pre- and post-transition—to reveal the ways in which fear, suspicion, and dismissiveness toward femininity shape our societal attitudes toward trans women, as well as gender and sexuality as a whole.
Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive
Serano, Julia. Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive. Berkeley, CA: Seal Press, 2013. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Among LGBTQ activists, there is a long history of lesbians and gay men dismissing bisexuals, transgender people, and other gender and sexual minorities. In each case, exclusion is based on the premise that certain ways of being gendered or sexual are more legitimate, natural, or righteous than others. In Excluded, Julia Serano chronicles many of these instances of exclusion and argues that marginalizing others often stems from a handful of assumptions that are routinely made about gender and sexuality.
Assata: An Autobiography
Shakur, Assata, and Angela Davis. Assata: An Autobiography. Chicago: Lawrence Hill Books, 2001. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Longtime activist, author and political figure Angela Davis brings us this expose of the women's movement in the context of the fight for civil rights and working class issues. She uncovers a side of the fight for suffrage many of us have not heard: the intimate tie between the anti-slavery campaign and the struggle for women's suffrage. She shows how the racist and classist bias of some in the women's movement have divided its own membership.
The Voice at the Back Door
Spencer, Elizabeth. The Voice at the Back Door. Louisiana State University Press, 1994. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

In the mid-1950s, the town of Lacey in the Mississippi hill country is a place where the lives of blacks and whites, though seemingly separate, are in fact historically and inevitably intertwined. When Lacey's fair-haired boy, Duncan Harper, is appointed interim sheriff, he makes public his private convictions about the equality of blacks before the law, and the combined threat and promise he represents to the understood order of things in Lacey affects almost every member of the community. In the end, Harper succeeds in pointing the way for individuals, both black and white, to find a more harmonious coexistence, but at a sacrifice all must come to regret.

In The Voice at the Back Door, Mississippi native Elizabeth Spencer gives form to the many voices that shaped her view of race relations while growing up, and at the same time discovers her own voice -- one of hope. Employing her extraordinary literary powers -- finely honed narrative techniques, insight into a rich, diverse cast of characters, and an unerring ear for dialect -- Spencer makes palpable the psychological milieu of a small southern town hobbled by tradition but lurching toward the dawn of the civil rights movement. First published in 1956, The Voice at the Back Door is Spencer's most highly praised novel yet, and her last to treat small-town life in Mississippi.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption
Stevenson, Bryan. Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption. New York: Spiegel & Grau, 2015. View the Ebook- Harvard Key requiredAbstract

"From one of the most brilliant and influential lawyers of our time comes an unforgettable true story about the redeeming potential of mercy. Bryan Stevenson was a gifted young attorney when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending the poor, the wrongly condemned, and those trapped in the furthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man sentenced to die for a notorious murder he didn't commit. The case drew Stevenson into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship - and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever."--Back cover.

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Gender and sexual diversity in U.S. higher education : contexts and opportunities for LGBTQ college students
Stewart, Dafina Lazarus, Kristen Renn, and G. Blue Brazelton, ed. Gender and sexual diversity in U.S. higher education : contexts and opportunities for LGBTQ college students. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2015. ViewAbstract
Since 2005, research on identity development, campus climate and policies, transgender issues, and institutional features such as type, leadership, and campus resources has broadened to encompass LGBTQ student engagement and success. This volume includes this enlarged body of research on LGBTQ students, taken in the context of widespread changes in public attitudes and public policies related to LGBTQ people, integrating scholarship and student affairs practice. 
 

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