Race and Ethnicity

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Spit Baths
Downs, Greg. Spit Baths. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
With a reporter's eye for the inside story and a historian's grasp of the ironies in our collective past, Greg Downs affectionately observes some of the last survivors of what Greil Marcus has called the old, weird America. Living off the map and out of sight, folks like Embee, Rudy, Peg, and Branch define themselves by where they are, not by what they eat, drink, or wear.
Never Caught : The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge
Dunbar, Erica Armstrong. Never Caught : The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge. New York: 37 Ink/Atria Books, 2017. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"A startling and eye-opening look into America's First Family, Never Caught is the powerful story about a daring woman of "extraordinary grit" (The Philadelphia Inquirer). When George Washington was elected president, he reluctantly left behind his beloved Mount Vernon to serve in Philadelphia, the temporary seat of the nation's capital. In setting up his household he brought along nine slaves, including Ona Judge. As the President grew accustomed to Northern ways, there was one change he couldn't abide: Pennsylvania law required enslaved people be set free after six months of residency in the state. Rather than comply, Washington decided to circumvent the law. Every six months he sent the slaves back down south just as the clock was about to expire. Though Ona Judge lived a life of relative comfort, she was denied freedom. So, when the opportunity presented itself one clear and pleasant spring day in Philadelphia, Judge left everything she knew to escape to New England. Yet freedom would not come without its costs. At just twenty-two-years-old, Ona became the subject of an intense manhunt led by George Washington, who used his political and personal contacts to recapture his property. "

A crisp and compulsively readable feat of research and storytelling" (USA TODAY), historian and National Book Award finalist Erica Armstrong Dunbar weaves a powerful tale and offers fascinating new scholarship on how one young woman risked everything to gain freedom from the famous founding father. -Publisher's Description

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College Curriculum at the Crossroads: Women of Color Reflect and Resist
Edwards, Kirsten T., and Maria Guadalupe del Davidson, ed. College Curriculum at the Crossroads: Women of Color Reflect and Resist. Critical social thought. New York, NY: Routledge, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

This book explores the ways in which college curriculum is complicated, informed, understood, resisted, and enriched by women of color.

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For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood—and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education
Emdin, Christopher. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood—and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education. A Simmons College/Beacon Press race, education, and democracy series book For white folks who teach in the hood– and the rest of y'all too. Boston: Beacon Press, 2016. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)
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How to Be Less Stupid About Race: On Racism, White Supremacy, and the Racial Divide
Fleming, Crystal Marie. How to Be Less Stupid About Race: On Racism, White Supremacy, and the Racial Divide. Penguin Random House, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
"A primer that explores how our racist American society socializes us all to be racially stupid--and what we can do about it"-- Provided by publisher.
R.A.C.E. Mentoring Through Social Media: Black and Hispanic Scholars Share Their Journey in the Academy
Ford, Donna Y., Michelle Trotman Scott, and Ramon B. Goings, ed. R.A.C.E. Mentoring Through Social Media: Black and Hispanic Scholars Share Their Journey in the Academy. Contemporary perspectives on access, equity, and achievement. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing Inc, 2017. View the BookAbstract
Advice for scholars of color in how to survive and thrive in academia.
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Bad Feminist: Essays
Gay, Roxane. Bad Feminist: Essays. First edition. New York: Harper Perennial, 2014. View the BookAbstract
In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a woman (Sweet Valley High) of color (The Help) while also taking readers on a ride through culture of the last few years (Girls, Django in Chains) and commenting on the state of feminism today (abortion, Chris Brown). The portrait that emerges is not only one of an incredibly insightful woman continually growing to understand herself and our society, but also one of our culture.
Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body
Gay, Roxane. Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body. First edition. New York: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2017. View the BookAbstract
New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and authority that have made her one of the most admired voices of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to be overweight in a time when the bigger you are, the less you are seen.
Scottsboro: An American Tragedy
Goodman, Barak. Scottsboro: An American Tragedy. Social Media Productions, 2000. View streaming video (Harvard Key)Abstract
Powerful Oscar nominated documentary about when fate places people in the wrong place at the wrong time and when fear and suspicion fuel injustice. The once-famous case of the nine Scottsboro Boys is the tale of such a dramatic miscarriage of justice that started in the early 1930s: nine poor young black men, charges of white rape, a fancy New York Jewish defense lawyer, an all-white Alabama jury, sentences of death culminating in a dogged international (Communist inspired) campaign to free the “Scottsboro Boys”.
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Becoming American?: The Forging of Arab and Muslim Identity in Pluralist America
Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck. Becoming American?: The Forging of Arab and Muslim Identity in Pluralist America. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2011. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Countless generations of Arabs and Muslims have called the United States home. Yet while diversity and pluralism continue to define contemporary America, many Muslims are viewed by their neighbors as painful reminders of conflict and violence. In this concise volume, renowned historian Yvonne Haddad argues that American Muslim identity is as uniquely American it is for as any other race, nationality, or religion.
Latina Politics, Latino Politics: Gender, Culture, and Political Participation in Boston
Hardy-Fanta, Carol. Latina Politics, Latino Politics: Gender, Culture, and Political Participation in Boston. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, Submitted. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)
Stories from the Front of the Room: How Higher Education Faculty of Color Overcome Challenges and Thrive in the Academy
Harris, Michelle, Sherrill L Sellers, Orly Clerge, and Frederick W. Jr. Gooding, ed. Stories from the Front of the Room: How Higher Education Faculty of Color Overcome Challenges and Thrive in the Academy. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017. View the BookAbstract
This book focuses on the boundaries which faculty of color encounter in everyday experiences on campus and presents a more complete picture of life in the academy - one that documents how faculty of color are tested, but also how they can not only overcome, but thrive in their respective educational institutions.
Truth Without Tears: African American Women Deans Share Lessons in Leadership
Hodges, Carolyn R., and Olga M. Welch. Truth Without Tears: African American Women Deans Share Lessons in Leadership. Race and education series. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard Education Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
This is a book about college and university administration and leadership on the part of two African American deans.
The Color of Privilege: Three Blasphemies on Race and Feminism
Hurtado, Aída. The Color of Privilege: Three Blasphemies on Race and Feminism. Critical perspectives on women and gender. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This book explores how women of different ethnic/racial groups conceive of feminism. Aída Hurtado advances the theory of relational privilege to explain those differing conceptions. She argues that the different responses to feminism by women of color are not so much the result of personality or cultural differences between white women and women of color, but of their differing relationship to white men.
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Waking up White: And Finding Myself in the Story of Race
Irving, Debby. Waking up White: And Finding Myself in the Story of Race. Cambridge, MA: Elephant Room Press, 2014. View the BookAbstract
For twenty-five years, Debby Irving sensed inexplicable racial tensions in her personal and professional relationships. As a colleague and neighbor, she worried about offending people she dearly wanted to befriend. As an arts administrator, she didn't understand why her diversity efforts lacked traction. In Waking Up White, Irving tells her often cringe-worthy story with such openness that readers will turn every page rooting for her-and ultimately for all of us.
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The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students
Jack, Anthony Abraham. The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

Getting in is only half the battle. The Privileged Poor reveals how-and why-disadvantaged students struggle at elite colleges, and explains what schools can do differently if these students are to thrive.The Ivy League looks different than it used to. College presidents and deans of admission have opened their doors-and their coffers-to support a more diverse student body. But is it enough just to admit these students? In The Privileged Poor, Anthony Jack reveals that the struggles of less privileged students continue long after they've arrived on campus. Admission, they quickly learn, is not the same as acceptance. This bracing and necessary book documents how university policies and cultures can exacerbate preexisting inequalities and reveals why these policies hit some students harder than others.Despite their lofty aspirations, top colleges hedge their bets by recruiting their new diversity largely from the same old sources, admitting scores of lower-income black, Latino, and white undergraduates from elite private high schools like Exeter and Andover. These students approach campus life very differently from students who attended local, and typically troubled, public high schools and are often left to flounder on their own. Drawing on interviews with dozens of undergraduates at one of America's most famous colleges and on his own experiences as one of the privileged poor, Jack describes the lives poor students bring with them and shows how powerfully background affects their chances of success.If we truly want our top colleges to be engines of opportunity, university policies and campus cultures will have to change. Jack provides concrete advice to help schools reduce these hidden disadvantages-advice we cannot afford to ignore.

Also available as print book (HOLLIS# 99153735717903941)

Queer People of Color in Higher Education
Johnson, Joshua Moon, and Gabriel Javier. Queer People of Color in Higher Education. Contemporary perspectives on LGBTQ advocacy in societies. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, Inc, 2017. View the BookAbstract
A comprehensive work discussing the lived experiences of queer people of color on college campuses. This book will create conversations and provide resources to best support students, faculty, and staff of color who are people of color and identify as LGBTQ. The edited volume covers emerging issues that are affecting higher education around the country.
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The Time between Places: Stories That Weave In and Out of Egypt and America
Kaldas, Pauline. The Time between Places: Stories That Weave In and Out of Egypt and America. University of Arkansas Press, 2010. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This collection of twenty stories delves into the lives of Egyptian characters, from those living in Egypt to those who have immigrated to the United States. With subtle and eloquent prose, the complexities of these characters are revealed, opening a door into their intimate struggles with identity and place. We meet people who are tempted by the possibilities of America and others who are tempted by the desire to return home. Some are in the throes of re-creating themselves in the new world while others seem to be embedded in the loss of their homeland. Many of these characters, although physically located in either the United States or Egypt, have lives that embrace both cultures.
Campus Counterspaces: Black and Latinx Students' Search for Community at Historically White Universities
Keels, Micere. Campus Counterspaces: Black and Latinx Students' Search for Community at Historically White Universities. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

Frustrated with the flood of news articles and opinion pieces that were skeptical of minority students' "imagined" campus microaggressions, Micere Keels, a professor of comparative human development, set out to provide a detailed account of how racial-ethnic identity structures Black and Latinx students' college transition experiences.

Tracking a cohort of more than five hundred Black and Latinx students since they enrolled at five historically white colleges and universities in the fall of 2013, Campus Counterspaces finds that these students were not asking to be protected from new ideas. Instead, they relished exposure to new ideas, wanted to be intellectually challenged, and wanted to grow. However, Keels argues, they were asking for access to counterspaces-safe spaces that enable radical growth. They wanted counterspaces where they could go beyond basic conversations about whether racism and discrimination still exist. They wanted time in counterspaces with likeminded others where they could simultaneously validate and challenge stereotypical representations of their marginalized identities and develop new counter narratives of those identities.

In this critique of how universities have responded to the challenges these students face, Keels offers a way forward that goes beyond making diversity statements to taking diversity actions.

How to Be an Antiracist
Kendi, Ibram X. How to Be an Antiracist. New York: One World, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"The only way to undo racism is to consistently identify and describe it -- and then dismantle it." Ibram X. Kendi's concept of antiracism reenergizes and reshapes the conversation about racial justice in America -- but even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi asks us to think about what an antiracist society might look like, and how we can play an active role in building it. In this book, Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science, bringing it all together with an engaging personal narrative of his own awakening to antiracism. How to Be an Antiracist is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond an awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a truly just and equitable society." -- Provided by publisher.

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