Race and Ethnicity

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Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption
Stevenson, Bryan. Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption. New York: Spiegel & Grau, 2015. View the Ebook- Harvard Key requiredAbstract

"From one of the most brilliant and influential lawyers of our time comes an unforgettable true story about the redeeming potential of mercy. Bryan Stevenson was a gifted young attorney when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending the poor, the wrongly condemned, and those trapped in the furthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man sentenced to die for a notorious murder he didn't commit. The case drew Stevenson into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship - and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever."--Back cover.

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Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race
Sue, Derald Wing. Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley, 2015. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"Learn to talk about race openly, honestly, and productivelyMost people avoid discussion of race-related topics because of the strong emotions and feelings of discomfort that inevitably accompany such conversations. Rather than endure the conflict of racial realities, many people choose instead to avoid the topic altogether, or remain silent when it is raised. Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: Understanding and Facilitating Difficult Dialogues on Race puts an end to that dynamic by sharing strategies for smoothing conversations about race in a productive manner.A guide for facilitating and participating in difficult dialogues about race, author Derald Wing Sue - an internationally recognized expert on multiculturalism, diversity, and microaggressions - explores the characteristics, dynamics, and meaning behind discussions about race as well as the hidden "ground rules" that inhibit honest and productive dialogue. Through emotional and visceral examples, this book explains why conversations revolving around racial issues are so difficult, and provides guidelines, techniques, and advice for navigating and leading honest and forthright discussions. Readers will develop a stronger ability to build rapport with people unlike themselves, and discover how not talking about race impacts society as a whole. Overcome and make visible the fears associated with race talk Learn practical ideas for talking openly about race Facilitate and navigate discussion with expert strategy Examine the hidden rules that govern race talk Understand the benefits of successful conversations Discussions about race do not have to result in disastrous consequences, and can in fact be highly beneficial to all parties involved. It's important that people have the ability to converse openly and honestly with their students, colleagues, children, and neighbors, and Race Talk provides the path for achieving this goal"– Provided by publisher.

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Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: and Other Conversations About Race
Tatum, Beverly Daniel. Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: and Other Conversations About Race. New York: Basic Books, 2003. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
"Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of race in America"- From Publisher Site
From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation
Taylor, Keeanga-Yamahtta. From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation. Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2016. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"Activist and scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and persistence of structural inequality such as mass incarceration and Black unemployment. In this context, she argues that this new struggle against police violence holds the potential to reignite a broader push for Black liberation"--Front flap.

Print Book Also Available (HOLLIS #990145227100203941)

Whitewashed: America's Invisible Middle Eastern Minority
Tehranian, John. Whitewashed: America's Invisible Middle Eastern Minority. New York: New York University Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
Focusing on the contemporary immigration debate, the war on terrorism, media portrayals of Middle Easterners, and the processes of creating racial stereo-types, John Tehranian argues that, despite its many successes, the modern civil rights movement has not done enough to protect the liberties of Middle Eastern Americans, By following how concepts of whiteness have transformed over time, Whitewashed forces readers to rethink and question some of their most deeply held assumptions about race in American society.
Latino Urbanism: The Politics of Planning, Policy and Redevelopment
Torres, Rodolfo D., and David R. Diaz, ed. Latino Urbanism: The Politics of Planning, Policy and Redevelopment. Democracy and urban landscapes. New York: New York University Press, 2012. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
The nation's Latina/o population has now reached over 50 million, or 15% of the estimated total U.S. population of 300 million, and a growing portion of the world's population now lives and works in cities that are increasingly diverse. Latino Urbanism provides the first national perspective on Latina/o urban policy, addressing a wide range of planning policy issues that impact both Latinas/os in the US, as well as the nation as a whole, tracing how cities develop, function, and are affected by socio-economic change. The contributors are a diverse group of Latina/o scholars attempting to lin
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Rethinking Racial Justice
Valls, Andrew. Rethinking Racial Justice. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018. View the e-book (Harvard Key required)Abstract
The racial injustice that continues to plague the United States couldn't be a clearer challenge to the country's idea of itself as a liberal and democratic society, where all citizens have a chance at a decent life. So what must a liberal society do to address the legacies of its past, and how should we aim to reconceive liberalism in order to do so? In this work, Andrew Valls takes issue with solutions from both the left and the right, and therefore with the constricted ways in which racial justice is debated in the United States today.
Learning to Be Latino: How Colleges Shape Identity Politics
Verduzco Reyes, Daisy. Learning to Be Latino: How Colleges Shape Identity Politics. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

In Learning to Be Latino, sociologist Daisy Verduzco Reyes paints a vivid picture of Latino student life at a liberal arts college, a research university, and a regional public university, outlining students’ interactions with one another, with non-Latino peers, and with faculty, administrators, and the outside community. Reyes identifies the normative institutional arrangements that shape the social relationships relevant to Latino students’ lives, including school size, the demographic profile of the student body, residential arrangements, the relationship between students and administrators, and how well diversity programs integrate students through cultural centers and retention centers. Together these characteristics create an environment for Latino students that influences how they interact, identify, and come to understand their place on campus.
 
Drawing on extensive ethnographic observations, Reyes shows how college campuses shape much more than students’ academic and occupational trajectories; they mold students’ ideas about inequality and opportunity in America, their identities, and even how they intend to practice politics.  

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Counternarratives from Women of Color Academics: Bravery, Vulnerability, and Resistance
Whitaker, Manya Catrice, and Eric Anthony Grollman, ed. Counternarratives from Women of Color Academics: Bravery, Vulnerability, and Resistance. New York: Routledge, 2019. View the eBookAbstract
This book documents the lived experiences of women of color academics who have leveraged their professional positions to challenge the status quo in their scholarship, teaching, service, activism, and leadership. By presenting reflexive work from various vantage points within and outside of the academy, contributors document the cultivation of mentoring relationships, the use of administrative roles to challenge institutional leadership, and more.
Charleston Syllabus: Readings on Race, Racism, and Racial Violence
Williams, Chad, Kidada E Williams, and Keisha N. Blain, ed. Charleston Syllabus: Readings on Race, Racism, and Racial Violence , 2016. View the BookAbstract
"Charleston Syllabus is a reader-a collection of new essays and columns published in the wake of the massacre, along with selected excerpts from key existing scholarly books and general-interest articles. The collection draws from a variety of disciplines-history, sociology, urban studies, law, critical race theory-and includes discussion questions and a selected and annotated bibliography for further reading, drawing from such texts as the confederate constitution, South Carolina's secession declaration, songs, poetry, slave narratives, and literacy texts. As timely as it is necessary, the book will be a valuable resource for understanding the roots of American systemic racism, white privilege, the uses and abuses of the Confederate flag and its ideals, the black church as a foundation for civil rights activity and state violence against such activity, and critical whiteness studies."- provided by the publisher.
Outside the Xy: A Bklyn Boihood Anthology
Willis, Morgan Mann. Outside the Xy: A Bklyn Boihood Anthology. 1st ed. Riverdale, NY: Riverdale Avenue Books, 2016. View the BookAbstract
An anthology of more than 50 stories, memoirs, poems, ideas, essays and letters–all examining what it looks like, feels like, and is like to inhabit masculinity outside of cisgender manhood as people of color in the world.
The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy
Wilson, William J. The Truly Disadvantaged: The Inner City, the Underclass, and Public Policy. 2nd ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012. View the BookAbstract
Renowned American sociologist William Julius Wilson takes a look at the social transformation of inner city ghettos, offering a sharp evaluation of the convergence of race and poverty. Rejecting both conservative and liberal interpretations of life in the inner city, Wilson offers essential information and a number of solutions to policymakers. The Truly Disadvantaged is a wide-ranging examination, looking at the relationship between race, employment, and education from the 1950s onwards, with surprising and provocative findings. This second edition also includes a new afterword from Wilson himself that brings the book up to date and offers fresh insight into its findings.
The Declining Significance of Race: Blacks and Changing American Institutions
Wilson, William J. The Declining Significance of Race: Blacks and Changing American Institutions. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2012. View the BookAbstract
The Declining Significance of Race immediately sparked controversy with its contentious thesis that race was becoming less of a deciding factor in the life chances of black Americans than class.  This new edition of the seminal book includes a new afterword in which William Julius Wilson not only reflects on the debate surrounding the book, but also presents a provocative discussion of race, class, and social policy.
Understanding Inclusion: Core Concepts, Policy and Practice
Woolley, Richard. Understanding Inclusion: Core Concepts, Policy and Practice. London ; New York: Routledge, 2018. View the BookAbstract
Understanding Inclusion is a rich, comprehensive exploration of inclusion in education, challenging us to think about being 'inclusive' in its broadest sense. It unpicks a wide range of complex themes and issues that impact on educational practice, supporting educational professionals in helping teachers and learners understand difference as the norm, and not the exception.
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Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America
Yancy, George. Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2018. View the BookAbstract
When George Yancy penned a New York Times op-ed entitled 'Dear White America' asking white Americans to confront the ways that they benefit from racism, he knew his article would be controversial. But he was unprepared for the flood of vitriol in response. The resulting blowback played out in the national media, with critics attacking Yancy in every form possible--including death threats--and supporters rallying to his side. Despite the rhetoric of a 'post-race' America, Yancy quickly discovered that racism is still alive, crude, and vicious in its expression. In Backlash, Yancy expands upon the original article and chronicles the ensuing controversy as he seeks to understand what it was about the op-ed that created so much rage among so many white readers. He challenges white Americans to rise above the vitriol and to develop a new empathy for the African American experience.
Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America
Yancy, George. Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"When George Yancy penned a New York Times article entitled "Dear White America," he knew that he was courting controversy. Here, Yancy chronicles the ensuing blowback as he seeks to understand what it was that created so much rage among so many white readers. He challenges white Americans to develop a new empathy for the African American experience."–Provided by publisher.

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