Complete Bookshelf

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Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide
Chermayeff, Maro. Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide. Roco FIlms, 2012. View the film (Harvard Key)Abstract
 Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide, based on the widely acclaimed book by Pulitzer Prize winners Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn was filmed in 10 countries and follows Kristof, WuDunn, and celebrity activists America Ferrera, Diane Lane, Eva Mendes, Meg Ryan, Gabrielle Union, and Olivia Wilde on a journey to tell the stories of inspiring, courageous individuals. Across the globe oppression is being confronted, and real meaningful solutions are being fashioned through health care, education, and economic empowerment for women and girls.
Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation
Clare, Eli. Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation. Cambridge, MA: South End Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
 
Occupying the Academy: Just How Important Is Diversity Work in Higher Education?
Clark, Christine, Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, and Mark Brimhall-Vargas, ed. Occupying the Academy: Just How Important Is Diversity Work in Higher Education?. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This book looks courageously at diversity in higher education through critical, social justice-oriented theoretical lenses. The strength of this edited volume rests in the various case studies as told from the perspective of academic leaders specifically employed as chief diversity officers, mid-level administrators, and faculty members. These case studies uncover the persistent challenges of racism in higher education.
Between the World and Me
Coates, Ta-Nehisi. Between the World and Me. New York: Spiegel & Grau, 2015. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of "race," a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men–bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates's attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son–and readers–the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children's lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward."–Publisher's description. 

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Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment
Collins, Patricia Hill. Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment. New York: Routledge, 2002. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
In spite of the double burden of racial and gender discrimination, African-American women have developed a rich intellectual tradition that is not widely known.
Fruitvale Station
Coogler, Ryan. Fruitvale Station. Weinstein Company, 2013. View the FilmAbstract
Fruitvale Station is a 2013 American biographical drama film written and directed by Ryan Coogler. It is Coogler's first feature-length film and is based on the events leading to the death of Oscar Grant, an African American young man who was killed in 2009 by BART police officer Johannes Mehserle at the Fruitvale district station of the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) system in Oakland.
Black Panther
Coogler, Ryan. Black Panther. Buena Vista Home Entertainment, 2018. View the FilmAbstract
King T'Challa returns home to the isolated, technologically advanced African nation of Wakanda to serve as new leader. However, T'Challa soon finds that he is challenged for the throne from divisions within his own country. When two enemies conspire to destroy Wakanda, the hero known as Black Panther must join forces with C.I.A. agent Everett K. Ross and members of the Wakandan Special Forces, to prevent Wakanda from being drawn into a world war.
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The Color of Mind: Why the Origins of the Achievement Gap Matter for Justice
Darby, Derrick, and John L. Rury. The Color of Mind: Why the Origins of the Achievement Gap Matter for Justice. History and philosophy of education. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Rejecting the view that racial differences in educational achievement are a product of innate or cultural differences, Darby and Rury uncover the historical interplay between ideas about race and American schooling, to show clearly that the racial achievement gap has been socially and institutionally constructed.
Daughters of the Dust
Dash, Julie. Daughters of the Dust. Kino Video, 2000. View the FilmAbstract
Daughters of the Dust is a 1991 independent film written, directed and produced by Julie Dash and is the first feature film directed by an African-American woman distributed theatrically in the United States. Set in 1902, it tells the story of three generations of Gullah (also known as Geechee) women in the Peazant family on Saint Helena Island as they prepare to migrate to the North on the mainland.
Southern Comfort
Davis, Kate. Southern Comfort. Docurama, 2003. View the FilmAbstract
Southern Comfort is a 2001 documentary film about the final year in the life of Robert Eads, a transgender man. Eads, diagnosed with ovarian cancer, was turned down for treatment by a dozen doctors out of fear that treating such a patient would hurt their reputations. By the time Eads received treatment, the cancer was too advanced to save his life.
Women, Race & Class
Davis, Angela Y. Women, Race & Class. Black women writers series. 1st ed. New York: Vintage Books, Random House, 1983. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Longtime activist, author and political figure, Angela Davis, brings us this expose of the women's movement in the context of the fight for civil rights and working class issues. She uncovers a side of the fight for suffrage many of us have not heard: the intimate tie between the anti-slavery campaign and the struggle for women's suffrage. She shows how the racist and classist bias of some in the women's movement have divided its own membership.
White Fragility: Why It's so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism
DiAngelo, Robin J. White Fragility: Why It's so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism. Boston: Beacon Press, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"In this groundbreaking and timely book, antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility. Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo explores how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively."- Publisher's description.

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Spit Baths
Downs, Greg. Spit Baths. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
With a reporter's eye for the inside story and a historian's grasp of the ironies in our collective past, Greg Downs affectionately observes some of the last survivors of what Greil Marcus has called the old, weird America. Living off the map and out of sight, folks like Embee, Rudy, Peg, and Branch define themselves by where they are, not by what they eat, drink, or wear.
Has the Gay Movement Failed?
Duberman, Martin B, Has the Gay Movement Failed?. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
The past fifty years have seen significant shifts in attitudes toward LGBTQ people and wider acceptance of them in the United States and the West. Yet the extent of this progress, argues Martin Duberman, has been more broad and conservative than deep and transformative. One of the most renowned historians of the American left and LGBTQ movement, as well as a pioneering social-justice activist, Duberman reviews the fifty years since Stonewall with an immediacy and rigor that informs and energizes. He revisits the early gay movement and its progressive vision for society, and puts the left on notice as failing time and again to embrace the queer potential for social transformation. Acknowledging the elimination of some of the most discriminatory policies that plagued earlier generations, he takes note of the cost--the sidelining of radical goals on the way to achieving more normative inclusion. Illuminating the fault lines both within and beyond the movements of the past and today, this critical book is also hopeful. Duberman urges us to learn from this history to fight for a truly inclusive and expansive society.
Never Caught : The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge
Dunbar, Erica Armstrong. Never Caught : The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge. New York: 37 Ink/Atria Books, 2017. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"A startling and eye-opening look into America's First Family, Never Caught is the powerful story about a daring woman of "extraordinary grit" (The Philadelphia Inquirer). When George Washington was elected president, he reluctantly left behind his beloved Mount Vernon to serve in Philadelphia, the temporary seat of the nation's capital. In setting up his household he brought along nine slaves, including Ona Judge. As the President grew accustomed to Northern ways, there was one change he couldn't abide: Pennsylvania law required enslaved people be set free after six months of residency in the state. Rather than comply, Washington decided to circumvent the law. Every six months he sent the slaves back down south just as the clock was about to expire. Though Ona Judge lived a life of relative comfort, she was denied freedom. So, when the opportunity presented itself one clear and pleasant spring day in Philadelphia, Judge left everything she knew to escape to New England. Yet freedom would not come without its costs. At just twenty-two-years-old, Ona became the subject of an intense manhunt led by George Washington, who used his political and personal contacts to recapture his property. "

A crisp and compulsively readable feat of research and storytelling" (USA TODAY), historian and National Book Award finalist Erica Armstrong Dunbar weaves a powerful tale and offers fascinating new scholarship on how one young woman risked everything to gain freedom from the famous founding father. -Publisher's Description

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Critical Approaches to Women and Gender in Higher Education
Eddy, Pamela Lynn, Kelly Ward, and Tehmina Khwaja, ed. Critical Approaches to Women and Gender in Higher Education. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. View the BookAbstract
Despite the increasing numbers of women in higher education, gendered structures continue to hinder women’s advancement in academia. This book goes beyond the numbers to examine the issues facing those members of academia with non-dominant gender identities.
Boy Erased
Edgerton, Joel. Boy Erased. Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, 2019. View the FilmAbstract
Boy Erased tells the courageous story of Jared Eamons, the son of a Baptist pastor in a small American town, who must overcome the fallout of being outed to his parents. His parents struggle with reconciling their love for their son with their beliefs. Fearing a loss of family, friends, and community, Jared is pressured into attending a conversion therapy program. While there, Jared comes into conflict with its leader and begins his journey to finding his own voice and accepting his true self.
College Curriculum at the Crossroads: Women of Color Reflect and Resist
Edwards, Kirsten T., and Maria Guadalupe del Davidson, ed. College Curriculum at the Crossroads: Women of Color Reflect and Resist. Critical social thought. New York, NY: Routledge, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

This book explores the ways in which college curriculum is complicated, informed, understood, resisted, and enriched by women of color.

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After Combat: True War Stories from Iraq and Afghanistan
Eide, Marian, and Michael Gibler. After Combat: True War Stories from Iraq and Afghanistan. Lincoln: Potomac Books, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
Approximately 2.5 million men and women have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan in the service of the U.S. War on Terror. Marian Eide and Michael Gibler have collected and compiled personal combat accounts from some of these war veterans. In modern warfare no deployment meets the expectations laid down by stories of Appomattox, Ypres, Iwo Jima, or Tet. Stuck behind a desk or the wheel of a truck, many of today’s veterans feel they haven’t even been to war though they may have listened to mortars in the night or dodged improvised explosive devices during the day. When a drone is needed to verify a target’s death or bullets are sprayed like grass seed, military offensives can lack the immediacy that comes with direct contact.
After Combat bridges the gap between sensationalized media and reality by telling war’s unvarnished stories. Participating soldiers, sailors, marines, and air force personnel (retired, on leave, or at the beginning of military careers) describe combat in the ways they believe it should be understood. In this collection of interviews, veterans speak anonymously with pride about their own strengths and accomplishments, with gratitude for friendships and adventures, and also with shame, regret, and grief, while braving controversy, misunderstanding, and sanction.
Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites Use Women's Labor and Ideas to Exploit the World
Eisenstein, Hester. Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites Use Women's Labor and Ideas to Exploit the World. Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2016. View the BookAbstract

In a pioneering reinterpretation of the role of mainstream feminism, Eisenstein shows how the world's ruling elites utilize women's labor and the ideas of women's liberation and empowerment to maintain their economic and political power, both at home and abroad. Her explorations range from the abolition of "welfare as we know it" in the United States to the creation of export-processing zones in the global South that depend on women's "nimble fingers"; from the championing of microcredit as a path to women's empowerment in the global South to the claim of women's presumed liberation in the West as an ideological weapon in the war on terrorism.

Eisenstein challenges activists and intellectuals to recognize that international feminism is at a fateful crossroads. She argues that it is crucial for feminists to throw in their lot with the progressive forces that are seeking alternatives to globalized corporate capitalism.

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