Complete Bookshelf

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For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood—and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education
Emdin, Christopher. For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood—and the Rest of Y'all Too: Reality Pedagogy and Urban Education. A Simmons College/Beacon Press race, education, and democracy series book For white folks who teach in the hood– and the rest of y'all too. Boston: Beacon Press, 2016. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)
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Stone Butch Blues
Feinberg, Leslie. Stone Butch Blues. Ithaca, NY: Firebrand Books, 1993. View the BookAbstract
Jess Goldberg decides to come out as a butch in the bars and factories of the pre-feminist '60s and then to pass as a man in order to survive when she is left without work or a community in the early '70s.
Thank You for Your Service
Finkel, David. Thank You for Your Service. 1st ed. New York: Sarah Crichton Books/ Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013. View the BookAbstract
From a MacArthur Fellow and the author of The Good Soldiers, a profound look at life after war. No journalist has reckoned with the psychology of war as intimately as David Finkel. In The Good Soldiers, his bestselling account from the front lines of Baghdad, Finkel shadowed the men of the 2-16 Infantry Battalion as they carried out the infamous surge, a grueling fifteen-month tour that changed all of them forever. Now Finkel has followed many of those same men as they've returned home and struggled to reintegrate--both into their family lives and into American society at large.
How to Be Less Stupid About Race: On Racism, White Supremacy, and the Racial Divide
Fleming, Crystal Marie. How to Be Less Stupid About Race: On Racism, White Supremacy, and the Racial Divide. Penguin Random House, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
"A primer that explores how our racist American society socializes us all to be racially stupid--and what we can do about it"-- Provided by publisher.
R.A.C.E. Mentoring Through Social Media: Black and Hispanic Scholars Share Their Journey in the Academy
Ford, Donna Y., Michelle Trotman Scott, and Ramon B. Goings, ed. R.A.C.E. Mentoring Through Social Media: Black and Hispanic Scholars Share Their Journey in the Academy. Contemporary perspectives on access, equity, and achievement. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing Inc, 2017. View the BookAbstract
Advice for scholars of color in how to survive and thrive in academia.
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Mean Little Deaf Queer: A Memoir
Galloway, Terry. Mean Little Deaf Queer: A Memoir. Boston: Beacon Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
In 1959, the year Terry Galloway turned nine, the voices of everyone she loved began to disappear. No one yet knew that an experimental antibiotic given to her mother had wreaked havoc on her fetal nervous system, eventually causing her to go deaf. Galloway has used theater, whether onstage or off, to defy and transcend her reality. With disarming candor, she writes about her mental breakdowns, her queer identity, and living in a silent, quirky world populated by unforgettable characters. What could have been a bitter litany of complaint is instead an unexpectedly hilarious and affecting take on life.
Bad Feminist: Essays
Gay, Roxane. Bad Feminist: Essays. First edition. New York: Harper Perennial, 2014. View the BookAbstract
In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a woman (Sweet Valley High) of color (The Help) while also taking readers on a ride through culture of the last few years (Girls, Django in Chains) and commenting on the state of feminism today (abortion, Chris Brown). The portrait that emerges is not only one of an incredibly insightful woman continually growing to understand herself and our society, but also one of our culture.
Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body
Gay, Roxane. Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body. First edition. New York: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2017. View the BookAbstract
New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and authority that have made her one of the most admired voices of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to be overweight in a time when the bigger you are, the less you are seen.
Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America
Gonzales, Roberto G. Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America. Oakland, California: University of California Press, 2016. View the BookAbstract
This ethnography asks why highly educated undocumented youth ultimately share similar work and life outcomes with their less-educated peers, even as higher education is touted as the path to integration and success in America.
Scottsboro: An American Tragedy
Goodman, Barak. Scottsboro: An American Tragedy. Social Media Productions, 2000. View streaming video (Harvard Key)Abstract
Powerful Oscar nominated documentary about when fate places people in the wrong place at the wrong time and when fear and suspicion fuel injustice. The once-famous case of the nine Scottsboro Boys is the tale of such a dramatic miscarriage of justice that started in the early 1930s: nine poor young black men, charges of white rape, a fancy New York Jewish defense lawyer, an all-white Alabama jury, sentences of death culminating in a dogged international (Communist inspired) campaign to free the “Scottsboro Boys”.
One More Theory About Happiness: A Memoir
Guest, Paul. One More Theory About Happiness: A Memoir. New York: Ecco, 2011. View the BookAbstract
A original memoir from the acclaimed poet and author about the accident that left him a paraplegic, and his struggle to find independence, love, and a life on his own terms.
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Becoming American?: The Forging of Arab and Muslim Identity in Pluralist America
Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck. Becoming American?: The Forging of Arab and Muslim Identity in Pluralist America. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2011. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Countless generations of Arabs and Muslims have called the United States home. Yet while diversity and pluralism continue to define contemporary America, many Muslims are viewed by their neighbors as painful reminders of conflict and violence. In this concise volume, renowned historian Yvonne Haddad argues that American Muslim identity is as uniquely American it is for as any other race, nationality, or religion.
Latina Politics, Latino Politics: Gender, Culture, and Political Participation in Boston
Hardy-Fanta, Carol. Latina Politics, Latino Politics: Gender, Culture, and Political Participation in Boston. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, Submitted. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)
Stories from the Front of the Room: How Higher Education Faculty of Color Overcome Challenges and Thrive in the Academy
Harris, Michelle, Sherrill L Sellers, Orly Clerge, and Frederick W. Jr. Gooding, ed. Stories from the Front of the Room: How Higher Education Faculty of Color Overcome Challenges and Thrive in the Academy. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017. View the BookAbstract
This book focuses on the boundaries which faculty of color encounter in everyday experiences on campus and presents a more complete picture of life in the academy - one that documents how faculty of color are tested, but also how they can not only overcome, but thrive in their respective educational institutions.
Truth Without Tears: African American Women Deans Share Lessons in Leadership
Hodges, Carolyn R., and Olga M. Welch. Truth Without Tears: African American Women Deans Share Lessons in Leadership. Race and education series. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard Education Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
This is a book about college and university administration and leadership on the part of two African American deans.
The Color of Privilege: Three Blasphemies on Race and Feminism
Hurtado, Aída. The Color of Privilege: Three Blasphemies on Race and Feminism. Critical perspectives on women and gender. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This book explores how women of different ethnic/racial groups conceive of feminism. Aída Hurtado advances the theory of relational privilege to explain those differing conceptions. She argues that the different responses to feminism by women of color are not so much the result of personality or cultural differences between white women and women of color, but of their differing relationship to white men.
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Waking up White: And Finding Myself in the Story of Race
Irving, Debby. Waking up White: And Finding Myself in the Story of Race. Cambridge, MA: Elephant Room Press, 2014. View the BookAbstract
For twenty-five years, Debby Irving sensed inexplicable racial tensions in her personal and professional relationships. As a colleague and neighbor, she worried about offending people she dearly wanted to befriend. As an arts administrator, she didn't understand why her diversity efforts lacked traction. In Waking Up White, Irving tells her often cringe-worthy story with such openness that readers will turn every page rooting for her-and ultimately for all of us.
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The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students
Jack, Anthony Abraham. The Privileged Poor: How Elite Colleges Are Failing Disadvantaged Students. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

Getting in is only half the battle. The Privileged Poor reveals how-and why-disadvantaged students struggle at elite colleges, and explains what schools can do differently if these students are to thrive.The Ivy League looks different than it used to. College presidents and deans of admission have opened their doors-and their coffers-to support a more diverse student body. But is it enough just to admit these students? In The Privileged Poor, Anthony Jack reveals that the struggles of less privileged students continue long after they've arrived on campus. Admission, they quickly learn, is not the same as acceptance. This bracing and necessary book documents how university policies and cultures can exacerbate preexisting inequalities and reveals why these policies hit some students harder than others.Despite their lofty aspirations, top colleges hedge their bets by recruiting their new diversity largely from the same old sources, admitting scores of lower-income black, Latino, and white undergraduates from elite private high schools like Exeter and Andover. These students approach campus life very differently from students who attended local, and typically troubled, public high schools and are often left to flounder on their own. Drawing on interviews with dozens of undergraduates at one of America's most famous colleges and on his own experiences as one of the privileged poor, Jack describes the lives poor students bring with them and shows how powerfully background affects their chances of success.If we truly want our top colleges to be engines of opportunity, university policies and campus cultures will have to change. Jack provides concrete advice to help schools reduce these hidden disadvantages-advice we cannot afford to ignore.

Also available as print book (HOLLIS# 99153735717903941)

No Place Like Home: Lessons in Activism from LGBT Kansas
Janovy, C.J. No Place Like Home: Lessons in Activism from LGBT Kansas. Lawrence, Kansas: University Press of Kansas, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

Far from the coastal centers of culture and politics, Kansas stands at the very center of American stereotypes about red states. In the American imagination, it is a place LGBT people leave. No Place Like Home is about why they stay. The book tells the epic story of how a few disorganized and politically naïve Kansans, realizing they were unfairly under attack, rolled up their sleeves, went looking for fights, and ended up making friends in one of the country’s most hostile states.

With its close-up view of the lives and work behind LGBT activism in Kansas, No Place Like Home fills a prairie-sized gap in the narrative of civil rights in America. The book also looks forward, as an inspiring guide for progressives concerned about the future of any vilified minority in an increasingly polarized nation.

Privilege, Power, and Difference
Johnson, Allan G. Privilege, Power, and Difference. Third edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education, 2018. View the BookAbstract
This short book is a tool for students and non-students alike to examine systems of privilege and difference in our society. Written in an accessible, conversational style, Johnson links theory with engaging examples in ways that enable readers to see the underlying nature and consequences of privilege and their connection to it.

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