Complete Bookshelf

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Queer People of Color in Higher Education
Johnson, Joshua Moon, and Gabriel Javier. Queer People of Color in Higher Education. Contemporary perspectives on LGBTQ advocacy in societies. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, Inc, 2017. View the BookAbstract
A comprehensive work discussing the lived experiences of queer people of color on college campuses. This book will create conversations and provide resources to best support students, faculty, and staff of color who are people of color and identify as LGBTQ. The edited volume covers emerging issues that are affecting higher education around the country.
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The Time between Places: Stories That Weave In and Out of Egypt and America
Kaldas, Pauline. The Time between Places: Stories That Weave In and Out of Egypt and America. University of Arkansas Press, 2010. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This collection of twenty stories delves into the lives of Egyptian characters, from those living in Egypt to those who have immigrated to the United States. With subtle and eloquent prose, the complexities of these characters are revealed, opening a door into their intimate struggles with identity and place. We meet people who are tempted by the possibilities of America and others who are tempted by the desire to return home. Some are in the throes of re-creating themselves in the new world while others seem to be embedded in the loss of their homeland. Many of these characters, although physically located in either the United States or Egypt, have lives that embrace both cultures.
Campus Counterspaces: Black and Latinx Students' Search for Community at Historically White Universities
Keels, Micere. Campus Counterspaces: Black and Latinx Students' Search for Community at Historically White Universities. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

Frustrated with the flood of news articles and opinion pieces that were skeptical of minority students' "imagined" campus microaggressions, Micere Keels, a professor of comparative human development, set out to provide a detailed account of how racial-ethnic identity structures Black and Latinx students' college transition experiences.

Tracking a cohort of more than five hundred Black and Latinx students since they enrolled at five historically white colleges and universities in the fall of 2013, Campus Counterspaces finds that these students were not asking to be protected from new ideas. Instead, they relished exposure to new ideas, wanted to be intellectually challenged, and wanted to grow. However, Keels argues, they were asking for access to counterspaces-safe spaces that enable radical growth. They wanted counterspaces where they could go beyond basic conversations about whether racism and discrimination still exist. They wanted time in counterspaces with likeminded others where they could simultaneously validate and challenge stereotypical representations of their marginalized identities and develop new counter narratives of those identities.

In this critique of how universities have responded to the challenges these students face, Keels offers a way forward that goes beyond making diversity statements to taking diversity actions.

How to Be an Antiracist
Kendi, Ibram X. How to Be an Antiracist. New York: One World, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"The only way to undo racism is to consistently identify and describe it -- and then dismantle it." Ibram X. Kendi's concept of antiracism reenergizes and reshapes the conversation about racial justice in America -- but even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi asks us to think about what an antiracist society might look like, and how we can play an active role in building it. In this book, Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science, bringing it all together with an engaging personal narrative of his own awakening to antiracism. How to Be an Antiracist is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond an awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a truly just and equitable society." -- Provided by publisher.

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Teaching about Race and Racism in the College Classroom : Notes from a White Professor
Kernahan, Cyndi. Teaching about Race and Racism in the College Classroom : Notes from a White Professor. Morgantown, WV: West Virginia University Press, 2019. View the Ebook- Harvard Key requiredAbstract

Teaching about race and racism can be a difficult business. Students and instructors alike often struggle with strong emotions, and many people have robust preexisting beliefs about race. At the same time, this is a moment that demands a clear understanding of racism. It is important for students to learn how we got here and how racism is more than just individual acts of meanness. Students also need to understand that colorblindness is not an effective anti-racism strategy.

In this book, Cyndi Kernahan argues that you can be honest and unflinching in your teaching about racism while also providing a compassionate learning environment that allows for mistakes and avoids shaming students. She provides evidence for how learning works with respect to race and racism along with practical teaching strategies rooted in that evidence to help instructors feel more confident. She also differentiates between how white students and students of color are likely to experience the classroom, helping instructors provide a more effective learning experience for all students.-Provided by Publisher

When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir
Khan-Cullors, Patrisse. When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir. First edition. New York: St Martin's Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
Raised by a single mother in an impoverished neighborhood in Los Angeles, Patrisse Khan-Cullors experienced firsthand the prejudice and persecution Black Americans endure at the hands of law enforcement. In 2013, when Trayvon Martin's killer went free, Patrisse's outrage led her to co-found Black Lives Matter with Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi. Condemned as terrorists and as a threat to America, the women founded a hashtag that birthed the movement to demand accountability from the authorities who continually turn a blind eye to the injustices inflicted upon people of Black and Brown skin.
Disability as Diversity in Higher Education: Policies and Practices to Enhance Student Success
Kim, Eunyoung, and Katherine C. Aquino, ed. Disability as Diversity in Higher Education: Policies and Practices to Enhance Student Success. New York, NY: Routledge is an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, an Informa Business, 2017. View the BookAbstract
Addressing disability not as a form of student impairment - as it is typically perceived at the postsecondary level - but rather as an important dimension of student diversity and identity, this book explores how disability can be more effectively incorporated into college environments. Chapters propose new perspectives, empirical research, and case studies to provide the necessary foundation for understanding the role of disability within campus climate and integrating students with disabilities into academic and social settings.
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Heavy
Laymon, Kiese. Heavy. New York: Scribner, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

Kiese Laymon writes eloquently and honestly about growing up a hard-headed Black son to a complicated and brilliant Black mother in Jackson, Mississippi. By attempting to name secrets and lies he and his mother spent a lifetime avoiding, he asks us to confront the terrifying possibility that few in this nation actually know how to responsibly love, and even fewer want to live under the weight of actually becoming free.

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The Making of Asian America: A History
Lee, Erika. The Making of Asian America: A History. First Simon & Schuster hardcover edition. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 2015. View the BookAbstract
A history of Asian Americans by one of the nation's preeminent scholars on the subject. In the past fifty years, Asian Americans have helped change the face of America and are now the fastest growing group in the United States. But as award-winning historian Erika Lee reminds us, Asian Americans also have deep roots in the country. The Making of Asian America tells the little-known history of Asian Americans and their role in American life, from the arrival of the first Asians in the Americas to the present-day. This book shows how generations of Asian immigrants and their American-born descendants have made and remade Asian American life in the United States.
Class and Campus Life: Managing and Experiencing Inequality at an Elite College
Lee, Elizabeth M. Class and Campus Life: Managing and Experiencing Inequality at an Elite College. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2016. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
In Class and Campus Life, Elizabeth M. Lee shows how class differences are enacted and negotiated by students, faculty, and administrators at an elite liberal arts college for women located in the Northeast. Lee shows how the lived experience of socioeconomic difference is often defined in moral, as well as economic, terms, and that tensions, often unspoken, undermine students' senses of belonging.
Blackkklansman
Lee, Spike. Blackkklansman. Universal Pictures Home Entertainment, 2018. View the FilmAbstract
Ron Stallworth, an African-American police officer from Colorado, successfully managed to infiltrate the local Ku Klux Klan and became the head of the local chapter.
Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches
Lorde, Audre. Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches. Crossing Press feminist series. Trumansburg, N.Y. Crossing Press, 1984. Publisher's VersionAbstract
The leader of contemporary feminist theory discusses such issues as racism, self-acceptance, and mother- and woman-hood.
The Paternity Test
Lowenthal, MIchael. The Paternity Test. 2012th ed. Madison: Terrace Books, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Having a baby to save a marriage--it's the oldest of cliches. But what if the marriage at risk is a gay one, and having a baby involves a surrogate mother? Pat Faunce is a faltering romantic, a former poetry major who now writes textbooks. A decade into his relationship with Stu, an airline pilot from a fraught Jewish family, he fears he's losing Stu to other men--and losing himself in their "no rules" arrangement. Yearning for a baby and a deeper commitment, he pressures Stu to move from Manhattan to Cape Cod, to the cottage where Pat spent boyhood summers. As they struggle to adjust to their new life, they enlist a surrogate: Debora, a charismatic Brazilian immigrant married to Danny, an American home rebuilder. Gradually, Pat and Debora bond, drawn together by the logistics of getting pregnant and away from their spouses. Pat gets caught between loyalties--to Stu and his family, to Debora, to his own potent desires--and wonders: is he fit to be a father? In one of the first novels to explore the experience of gay men seeking a child through surrogacy, Michael Lowenthal writes passionately about marriages and mistakes, loyalty and betrayal, and about how our drive to create families can complicate the ones we already have. The Paternity Test is a provocative look at the new "family values."
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Confronting Equity Issues on Campus: Implementing the Equity Scorecard in Theory and Practice
Malcom-Piqueux, Lindsey E., and Estela Mara Bensimon, ed. Confronting Equity Issues on Campus: Implementing the Equity Scorecard in Theory and Practice. Sterling, Va. Stylus, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Drawing on the theory of action research, the Equity Scorecard creates a structure for practitioners to become investigators of their own institutional culture, to become aware of racial disparities, confront their own practices and learn how things are done on their own turf to ask: In what ways am I contributing to equity/inequity?
Leading Educational Change: Global Issues, Challenges, and Lessons on Whole-System Reform
Malone, Helen Janc. Leading Educational Change: Global Issues, Challenges, and Lessons on Whole-System Reform. School reform. New York: Teachers College Press, 2013. View the BookAbstract
This collection features original essays from international superstars in the field of educational change. Each “think piece” draws on the latest knowledge from research, policy, and practice to provide important insights for creating systemic, meaningful reform. The authors directly address contemporary challenges, misconceptions, and failed strategies, while also offering solutions, ideas, and guiding questions for examination.
Why We Lost the ERA
Mansbridge, Jane J. Why We Lost the ERA. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986. View the BookAbstract
The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), which would have guaranteed women the same equal rights as men, passed Congress with an overwhelming majority in 1972. During the following ten years, the public repeatedly endorsed it in opinion surveys. Yet, for all the favor it enjoyed in the abstract, the ERA was never able to muster concrete support in enough states to become the law of the land. In this book, Jane Mansbridge explains why, as she argues that the ERA failed because it did not result in substantive changes in the position of women.
Beyond Retention: Cultivating Spaces of Equity, Justice, and Fairness for Women of Color in U.S. Higher Education
Marina, Brenda Louise Hammett, and Sabrina Ross, ed. Beyond Retention: Cultivating Spaces of Equity, Justice, and Fairness for Women of Color in U.S. Higher Education. Research for social justice. Charlotte, North Carolina: Information Age Publishing, Inc, 2016. View the BookAbstract
This book addresses the continued underrepresentation of women faculty of color at predominantly White colleges and universities. This text will be of interest to scholars interested in curriculum topics of race, gender, sexuality, and place.
The Minoritisation of Higher Education Students: An Examination of Contemporary Policies and Practice
Mieschbuehler, Ruth. The Minoritisation of Higher Education Students: An Examination of Contemporary Policies and Practice. Routledge research in higher education. Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge, an imprint of the Taylor & Francis Group, 2018. View the BookAbstract
This book explains how group-based social differentiation and student-centred education foster the idea that ethnic and social attributes matter, losing any sense of our common humanity. Considering the consequences of this for students and university education as a whole, and challenging all pre-existing ideas of how to approach reported ethnic attainment gaps. 
Safe Enough to Soar: Accelerating Trust, Inclusion, and Collaboration in the Workplace
Miller, Frederick A. Safe Enough to Soar: Accelerating Trust, Inclusion, and Collaboration in the Workplace. Berrett-Koehler Publishers, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This book introduces the concept of “interaction safety” and demonstrate how it can help create a work environment of trust, inclusion, and collaboration. It provides a four-level model for assessing and increasing the interaction safety in organizations, illustrated by short scenarios taken from real-life situations, and offers concrete actions team members, leaders, and organizations can take to build and maintain a productive, collaborative, and innovative environment.
Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism
Minh-Ha, Trinh T. Woman, Native, Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism. Bloomington, IN. Indiana University Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This book is located at the juncture of a number of different fields and disciplines, and it genuinely succeeds in pushing the boundaries of these disciplines further. It is one of the very few theoretical attempts to grapple with the writings of women of color.

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