Complete Bookshelf

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A Place for Us
Mirza, Fatima Farheen. A Place for Us. US 1st edition. New York: SJP for Hogarth, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, 2018. View the BookAbstract
A story of family identity and belonging follows an Indian family through the marriage of their daughter, from the parents' arrival in the United States to the return of their estranged son., As an Indian wedding gathers a family back together, parents Rafiq and Layla must reckon with the choices their children have made. There is Hadia: their headstrong, eldest daughter, whose marriage is a match of love and not tradition. Huda, the middle child, determined to follow in her sister's footsteps. And their estranged son, Amar, returns to the family for the first time in three years to take his place as brother of the bride. What secrets and betrayals have caused this close-knit family to fracture?
African American Males in Higher Education Leadership: Challenges and Opportunities
Mitchell (Ed.), Patricia A. African American Males in Higher Education Leadership: Challenges and Opportunities. Black studies & critical thinking ; v. 90. New York: Peter Lang, 2017. View the BookAbstract
African American Males in Higher Education Leadership: Challenges and Opportunities presents narratives from thirteen African American males working in higher education leadership. Their narratives describe the barriers and roadblocks that continue to impede them while climbing the ivory tower ladder to leadership.
Jewish American Paradox: The Chosen People and Modern Choices
Mnookin, Robert. Jewish American Paradox: The Chosen People and Modern Choices. Public Affairs, 2018. View the BookAbstract
In this thoughtful and perceptive book, Robert H. Mnookin argues that the answers of the past no longer serve American Jews today. The book boldly promotes a radically inclusive American-Jewish community--one where being Jewish can depend on personal choice and public self-identification, not simply birth or formal religious conversion. Instead of preventing intermarriage or ostracizing those critical of Israel, he envisions a community that embraces diversity and debate, and in so doing, preserves and strengthens the Jewish identity into the next generation and beyond.
Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More
Mock, Janet. Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More. New York: Atria Books, 2014. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
With unflinching honesty and moving prose, Janet Mock relays her experiences of growing up young, multiracial, poor, and trans in America, offering readers accessible language while imparting vital insight about the unique challenges and vulnerabilities of a marginalized and misunderstood population.
Grateful Nation: Student Veterans and the Rise of the "Military-Friendly" Campus
Moore, Ellen. Grateful Nation: Student Veterans and the Rise of the "Military-Friendly" Campus. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2017. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
In today's volunteer military many recruits enlist for the educational benefits, yet a significant number of veterans struggle in the classroom, and many drop out. The difficulties faced by student veterans have been attributed to various factors: poor academic preparation, PTSD and other postwar ailments, and allegedly antimilitary sentiments on college campuses. In Grateful Nation Ellen Moore challenges these narratives by tracing the experiences of Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans at two California college campuses. Drawing on interviews with dozens of veterans, classroom observations, and assessments of the work of veteran support organizations, Moore finds that veterans' academic struggles result from their military training and combat experience, which complicate their ability to function in civilian schools. While there is little evidence of antimilitary bias on college campuses, Moore demonstrates the ways in which college programs that conflate support for veterans with support for the institutional military lead to suppression of campus debate about the wars, discourage antiwar activism, and encourage a growing militarization.
This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color
Moraga, Cherríe, and Gloria Anzaldúa, ed. This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color. Fourth edition. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2015. View the BookAbstract
Through personal essays, criticism, interviews, testimonials, poetry, and visual art, this collection expores, as coeditor Cherrie Moraga writes, 'the complex confluence of identities–race, class, gender, sexuality–systemic to women of color oppression and liberation."
Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture
Morales, Ed. Latinx: The New Force in American Politics and Culture. London ; Brooklyn, N.Y. Verso, 2018. View the BookAbstract
The Latinx revolution in US culture, society, and politics. Latinx is the gender-neutral term that covers the largest racial minority in the United States, 17 percent of the country. In this groundbreaking discussion, Ed Morales explains how Latin political identities are tied to a long Latin American history of mestizaje, translatable as "mixedness" or "hybridity", and that this border thinking is both a key to understanding bilingual, bicultural Latin cultures and politics and a challenge to America's infamously black/white racial regime..
Meet Me Halfway: Milwaukee Stories.
Morales, Jennifer. Meet Me Halfway: Milwaukee Stories.. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2015. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
When Johnquell, an African American teen, suffers a serious accident in the home of his white neighbor, Mrs. Czernicki, his community must find ways to bridge divisions between black and white, gay and straight, old and young. Set in one of the nation’s most highly segregated cities—Milwaukee, Wisconsin—Meet Me Halfway tells stories of connections in a community with a tumultuous and divided past. In nine stories told from diverse perspectives, Jennifer Morales captures a Rust Belt city’s struggle to establish a common ground and a collective vision of the future.

Morales gives life to multifaceted characters—white schoolteachers and senior citizens, Latino landlords, black and Puerto Rican teens, political activists, and Vietnam vets. As their lives unfold in these stories, we learn about Johnquell’s family—his grandparents’ involvement in the local Black Panther Party, his sister’s on-again, off-again friendship with a white classmate, and his aunt’s identity crisis as she finds herself falling in love with a woman. We also meet Johnquell’s mother, Gloria, and his school friend Taquan, who is struggling to chart his own future.

As an activist mother in the thick of Milwaukee politics, Morales developed a keen ear and a tender heart for the kids who have inherited the city’s troubled racial legacy. With a critical eye on promises unfulfilled, Meet Me Halfway raises questions about the notion of a “postracial” society and, with humor and compassion, lifts up the day-to-day work needed to get there.
A Good Day to Die
Mueller, David, and Lynn Salt. A Good Day to Die. Alive Mind Cinema, 2011. View the Film- Harvard KeyAbstract
By recounting the life story of Dennis Banks, the Native American who co-founded the American Indian Movement (AIM) in 1968 to advocate and protect the rights of American Indians, the film provides an in-depth look at the history and issues surrounding AIM's formation. This film charts the rise and fall of a movement that fought for the civil rights of American Indians.
The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America
Muhammad, Khalil Gibran. The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America. Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 2010. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

The Idea of Black criminality was crucial to the making of modern urban America. Khalil Gibran Muhammad chronicles how, when, and why modern notions of black people as an exceptionally dangerous race of criminals first emerged. Well known are the lynch mobs and racist criminal justice practices in the South that stoked white fears of black crime and shaped the contours of the New South. In this illuminating book, Muhammad shifts our attention to the urban North as a crucial but overlooked site for the production and dissemination of those ideas and practices. Following the 1890 census - the first to measure the generation of African Americans born after slavery - crime statistics, new migration and immigration trends, and symbolic references to America as the promised land were woven into a cautionary tale about the exceptional threat black people posed to modern urban society. Excessive arrest rates and overrepresentation in northern prisons were seen by many whites - liberals and conservatives, northerners and southerners - as indisputable proof of blacks' inferiority. What else but pathology could explain black failure in the land of opportunity? Social scientists and reformers used crime statistics to mask and excuse anti-black racism, violence, and discrimination across the nation, especially in the urban North. The Condemnation of Blackness is the most thorough historical account of the enduring link between blackness and criminality in the making of modern urban America. It is a startling examination of why the echoes of America's Jim Crow past continue to resonate in 'color-blind' crime rhetoric today.

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Teaching for Inclusion: Eight Principles for Effective and Equitable Practice
Naraian, Srikala. Teaching for Inclusion: Eight Principles for Effective and Equitable Practice. New York: Teachers College Press, 2017. View the BookAbstract
Teaching for Inclusion shows how educators navigate the competing demands of everyday practice with examples from urban, suburban, elementary, and secondary schools. The author offers eight guiding principles that can be used to advance an inclusive pedagogy. These principles permit teachers to both acknowledge and draw from the conditions within which they work, even as they uphold their commitments to equitable schooling for students from historically marginalized groups, particularly students with disabilities. Situated in the everyday realities of classrooms that often include mandated testing requirements and accountability policies, this book addresses multiple dimensions of inclusive practice including curricular decisionmaking, the "grammar" of schooling, the status of family communities, and the demands of professional roles.
A Darker Shade of Crimson: Odyssey of a Harvard Chicano
Navarrette, Ruben. A Darker Shade of Crimson: Odyssey of a Harvard Chicano. New York: Bantam Books, 1994. View the BookAbstract
In 1985 an ambitious young Mexican-American from California’s rural San Joaquin Valley became one of the few Latinos to enter America’s most prestigious university. With intelligence and grace, Navarrette chronicles his experiences at Harvard, where he confronted questions of identity and ethnicity, and wrestled with the need to reconcile his values and opinions with the expectations of his family, his race, and society at large. More than a deeply personal memoir, A Darker Shade of Crimson also dares to pursue the complex questions of what needs to be done to provide a quality education for Latinos and other minorities in America.
What Is an American Muslim?: Embracing Faith and Citizenship
Naʻīm, ʻAbd Allāh Aḥmad. What Is an American Muslim?: Embracing Faith and Citizenship. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This title offers a pioneering exploration of American Muslim citizenship and identity, arguing against the prevalent emphasis on majority-minority politics and instead promoting a shared citizenship that both accommodates and transcends religious identity.
The Argonauts
Nelson, Maggie. The Argonauts. Minneapolis, Minnesota: Graywolf Press, 2015. View the BookAbstract
The Argonauts is a genre-bending memoir, a work of "autotheory" offering fresh, fierce, and timely thinking about desire, identity, and the limitations and possibilities of love and language. At its center is a romance: the story of the author's relationship with the artist Harry Dodge. This story, which includes Nelson's account of falling in love with Dodge, who is fluidly gendered, as well as her journey to and through a pregnancy, offers a firsthand account of the complexities and joys of (queer) family-making.
Miss Representation
Newsom, Jennifer Siebel. Miss Representation. Virgil Films and Entertainment, 2011. View the FIlm- Harvard KeyAbstract
Explores how mainstream media contributes to the under-representation of women in influential positions in America and challenges the media's portrayals of women.
Degrees of Difference: Women, Men, and the Value of Higher Education
Niemi, Nancy S. Degrees of Difference: Women, Men, and the Value of Higher Education. New York: Routledge, 2017. View the BookAbstract
This volume investigates the dissonance between the supposed advantage held by educated women and their continued lack of economic and political power. Niemi explains the developments of the so-called "female advantage" and "boy crisis" in American higher education, setting them alongside socioeconomic and racial developments in women’s and men’s lives throughout the last 40 years. Exploring the relationship between higher education credentials and their utility in creating political, economic, and social success, Degrees of Difference identifies ways in which gender and academic achievement contribute to women’s and men’s power to shape their lives. This important book brings new light to the issues of power, gender identities, and the role of American higher education in creating gender equity. (Abstract from publisher.
Good Kings Bad Kings: A Novel
Nussbaum, Susan. Good Kings Bad Kings: A Novel. Chapel Hill, NC: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill, 2013. View the BookAbstract
The residents at a facility for disabled young people in Chicago build trust and make friends in an effort to fight against their living conditions and mistreatment.
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Half and Half: Writers on Growing up Biracial and Bicultural
O'Hearn, Claudine C., ed. Half and Half: Writers on Growing up Biracial and Bicultural. 1st ed. New York: Pantheon Books, 1998. View the BookAbstract
As we approach the twenty-first century, biracialism and biculturalism are becoming increasingly common. Skin color and place of birth are no longer reliable signifiers of one's identity or origin. These eighteen essays, joined by a shared sense of duality, address the difficulties of not fitting into and the benefits of being part of two worlds. Through the lens of personal experience, they offer a broader spectrum of meaning for race and culture. And in the process, they map a new ethnic terrain that transcends racial and cultural division
Fading Scars: My Queer Disability History
O'Toole, Corbett Joan, Elizabeth Grace, and Karen Nakamura. Fading Scars: My Queer Disability History. Fort Worth, TX: Autonomous Press, 2015. View the BookAbstract
Uncovering stories about disability history and life, O’Toole shares her firsthand account of some of the most dramatic events in Disability History, and gives voice to those too often yet left out. From the 504 Sit-in and the founding of the Center for Independent Living in Berkeley, to the Disability Forum at the International Woman's Conference in Beijing; through dancing, sports, queer disability organizing and being a disabled parent, O’Toole explores her own and the disability community's power and privilege with humor, insight and honest observations.
The Emperor Has No Clothes: Teaching About Race and Racism to People Who Don't Want to Know
Okun, Tema. The Emperor Has No Clothes: Teaching About Race and Racism to People Who Don't Want to Know. Educational leadership for social justice. Charlotte, N.C. Information Age Publishing, 2010. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
"The Emperor Has No Clothes: Teaching About Race and Racism to People Who Don’t Want to Know offers theoretical grounding and practical approaches for leaders and teachers interested in effectively addressing racism and other oppressive constructs. The book draws both on the author’s extensive experience teaching about race and racism in classroom and community settings and from the theory and practice of a wide range of educators, activists, and researchers committed to social justice.

The first chapter looks at the toxic consequences of our western cultural insistence on profit, binary thinking, and individualism to establish the theoretical framework for teaching about race and racism. Chapter two investigates privileged resistance, offering a psycho/social history of denial, particularly as a product of racist culture. Chapter three reviews the research on the construction and reconstruction of dominant culture both historically and now in order to establish sound strategic approaches that educators, teachers, facilitators, and activists can take as we work together to move from a culture of profit and fear to one of shared hope and love. Chapter four lays out the stages of a process that supports teaching about racist, white supremacy culture, explaining how students can be taken through an iterative process of relationshipbuilding, analysis, planning, action, and reflection. The final chapter borrows from the brilliant, brave, and incisive writer Dorothy Allison to discuss the things the author knows for sure about how to teach people to see that which we have been conditioned to fear knowing. The chapter concludes with how to encourage and support collective and collaborative action as a critical goal of the process." - from Publisher's Site
 

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