Complete Bookshelf

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There There
Orange, Tommy. There There. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2018. View the BookAbstract
The book opens with an essay by Orange as a prologue, and then proceeds to follow a large cast of Native Americans living in the area of Oakland, CA, as they struggle with a wide array of challenges ranging from depression, alchoholism, unemployment, and the challenges of living with an ethnic identity of being ambiguously nonwhite. All coalesce at a community pow wow in Oakland.
Language, Race, and Power in Schools: A Critical Discourse Analysis
Orelus, Pierre W., ed. Language, Race, and Power in Schools: A Critical Discourse Analysis. Routledge research in education ; 182. New York: Routledge, 2017. View the BookAbstract
This edited volume documents the unique experiences of women of color in higher education administration. From full professors, senior administrators, deans, presidents, and chancellors, women of color share their social justice journeys to leadership roles in the academy. With a focus on women of color presidents, a rich landscape is painted through their own voices of their experiences as they ascend and lead higher education institutions, navigating complex dynamics influenced by their race, culture, class, and gender status.
Accountability and Opportunity in Higher Education: The Civil Rights Dimension
Orfield, Gary, and Nicholas W. Hillman, ed. Accountability and Opportunity in Higher Education: The Civil Rights Dimension. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard Education Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
Leading scholars address the unforeseen impact of accountability standards on students of color and the institutions that disproportionately serve them. The book, part of the ongoing body of work by the Civil Rights Project, describes how federal policies can worsen existing racial inequalities in higher education and offers alternative solutions aimed to protect and advance civil rights for low-income and minority students and their colleges.
An African American and LatinX History of the United States
Ortiz, Paul. An African American and LatinX History of the United States. Boston: Beacon Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
Scholar and activist,Paul Ortiz, challenges the notion of westward progress as exalted by widely taught formulations such as "manifest destiny" and "Jacksonian democracy," and shows how placing African American, Latinx, and Indigenous voices unapologetically front and center transforms US history into one of the working class organizing against imperialism.
Veterans' Policies, Veterans' Politics: New Perspectives on Veterans in the Modern United States
Ortiz, Stephen R., ed. Veterans' Policies, Veterans' Politics: New Perspectives on Veterans in the Modern United States. Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard KeyAbstract
Veterans' Policies, Veterans' Politics is the first multidisciplinary, comprehensive examination of the American veteran experience. Stephen Ortiz has compiled some of the best work on the formation and impact of veterans' policies, the politics of veterans' issues, and veterans' political engagement over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries in the United States.
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Race on Campus: Debunking Myths with Data
Park, Julie J. Race on Campus: Debunking Myths with Data. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
Race on Campus argues that there are pervasive and stubborn "myths" about diversity on college and university campuses, and that these myths obscure the notable significance and effects that diversity has already had on campus life.–Provided by publisher.
I Am Not Your Negro
Peck, Raoul. I Am Not Your Negro. Magnolia Home Entertainment, 2017. View the FIlm- Harvard KeyAbstract
Using James Baldwin's unfinished final manuscript, Remember This House, this documentary follows the lives and successive assassinations of three of the author's friends, Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., delving into the legacy of these iconic figures and narrating historic events using Baldwin's original words and a flood of rich archival material. An up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, this film is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter.
Jewish Peoplehood: An American Innovation
Pianko, Noam. Jewish Peoplehood: An American Innovation. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2015. View the eBookAbstract
Although fewer American Jews today describe themselves as religious, they overwhelmingly report a strong sense of belonging to the Jewish people. Indeed, Jewish peoplehood has eclipsed religion—as well as ethnicity and nationality—as the essence of what binds Jews around the globe to one another. In Jewish Peoplehood, Noam Pianko highlights the current significance and future relevance of “peoplehood” by tracing the rise, transformation, and return of this novel term. 
Everyday Antiracism: Getting Real About Race in School
Pollock, Mica. Everyday Antiracism: Getting Real About Race in School. New York: New Press: Distributed by W.W. Norton & Co, 2008. View the BookAbstract
Contributors describe concrete ways to analyze classroom interactions that may or may not be “racial,” deal with racial inequality and “diversity,” and teach to high standards across racial lines.
If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Qurʼan
Power, Carla. If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Qurʼan. 1st ed. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2015. View the BookAbstract
If the Oceans Were Ink is Carla Power's story of how she and her longtime friend Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi found a way to confront ugly stereotypes and persistent misperceptions that were cleaving their communities. Their friendship -- between a secular American and a madrasa-trained sheikh -- had always seemed unlikely, but now they were frustrated and bewildered by the battles being fought in their names. Both knew that a close look at the Quran would reveal a faith that preached peace and not mass murder; respect for women and not oppression. And so they embarked on a yearlong journey through the controversial text. A journalist who grew up in the Midwest and the Middle East, Power offers her unique vantage point on the Quran's most provocative verses as she debates with Akram at cafes, family gatherings, and packed lecture halls, conversations filled with both good humor and powerful insights. Their story takes them to madrasas in India and pilgrimage sites in Mecca, as they encounter politicians and jihadis, feminist activists and conservative scholars.
Journeys of Social Justice: Women of Color Presidents in the Academy
Pratt-Clarke, Menah, and Johanna Maes, ed. Journeys of Social Justice: Women of Color Presidents in the Academy. Black studies & critical thinking ; v. 88. New York: Peter Lang, 2017. View the BookAbstract
This edited volume documents the unique experiences of women of color in higher education administration. Women of color share their social justice journeys to leadership roles in the academy. With a focus on women of color presidents, a rich landscape is painted through their own voices of their experiences as they ascend and lead higher education institutions, navigating complex dynamics influenced by their race, culture, class, and gender status.
Life of the Mind Interrupted: Essays on Mental Health and Disability in Higher Education
Pryal, Katie Rose Guest. Life of the Mind Interrupted: Essays on Mental Health and Disability in Higher Education. Chapel Hill, NC: Blue Crow Publishing, 2017. View the BookAbstract
The essays in this book cover topics such as disclosure of disabilities, accommodations and accessibility, how to be a good abled friend to a disabled person, the trigger warnings debate, and more. Written for a popular audience, for those with disabilities and for those who want to learn more about living a disabled life, Life of the Mind Interrupted aims to make higher education, and the rest of our society, more humane.
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Pariah
Rees, Dee. Pariah. Universal City, CA: Universal Studios Home Entertainment, 2012. View the FilmAbstract
Alike is a 17-year-old African-American woman who lives with her parents and younger sister in Brooklyn's Fort Greene neighborhood. She has a flair for poetry, and is a good student at her local high school. Alike is quietly but firmly embracing her identity as a lesbian. Wondering how much she can confide in her family, Alike strives to get through adolescence with grace, humor, and tenacity–sometimes succeeding, sometimes not, but always moving forward.
Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's Journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim
Rehman, Sabeeha. Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's Journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim. First edition. New York: Arcade Publishing, 2016. View the BookAbstract
Threading My Prayer Rug is a richly textured reflection on what it is to be a Muslim in America today. Beginning with a sweetly funny, moving account of the author's arranged marriage, the author undercuts stereotypes and offers the refreshing view of an American life through Muslim eyes.
Ethnic Notions
Riggs, Marlon T. Ethnic Notions. California Newsreel, 1987. View the Film-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Ethnic Notions is a 1987 documentary film directed by Marlon Riggs. It examines anti-Black stereotypes that permeated popular culture from the ante-bellum period until the advent of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.
Dictionary of Latino Civil Rights History
Rosales, Arturo, ed. Dictionary of Latino Civil Rights History. Hispanic Civil Rights Series. Houston: Arte Publico Press, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
From the Alianza Hispano-Americana, a mutual aid society founded in Tucson, Arizona in 1894, to the Zoot Suit Riots in Los Angeles in 1943, this first-ever dictionary of important issues in the U.S. Latino struggle for civil rights defines a wide-ranging list of key terms. With over 922 entries on significant events, figures, laws, and other historical items, this ground-breaking reference work covers the fight for equality from the mid-nineteenth century to the present by the various Hispanic groups in the U.S. Rosales chronicles such landmark events as the development of farm worker unions and immigrant rights groups to the forces behind bilingual-bicultural education, feminist activities, and protests over discrimination, segregation, and police brutality. In this volume, he provides a comprehensive look at the history of the Latino civil rights movement. In addition to covering all of the major events in labor, politics, land reclamation, and education, this pioneering work includes never-before-published biographies of the major players in the history of America's largest minority group. An array of historical photos and entries outline the activities of all Hispanic populations in the United States, including citizens and immigrants, men and women. A complete subject index, timeline, and bibliographic documentation complement this definitive reference work compiled by the most respected authority on Latino civil rights.
Citizens by Degree: Higher Education Policy and the Changing Gender Dynamics of American Citizenship
Rose, Deondra. Citizens by Degree: Higher Education Policy and the Changing Gender Dynamics of American Citizenship. New York: Oxford University Press, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Author, Deondra Rose, shows that gender progress derives in large part from the actions of lawmakers who used a combination of redistributive and regulartory higher education policies to enhance women's incorporation into their roles as American citizens. Examining the development and impact of the National Defense Education Act of 1958, the Higher Education Act of 1965, and Title IX of the 1972 Educational Amendments, Rose argues that higher education policies represent a crucial factor in women's movement toward first-class citizenship.
The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America
Rothstein, Richard. The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America. First edition. New York ; London: Liveright Publishing Corporation, a division of W.W. Norton & Company, 2017. View the BookAbstract
Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on housing policy, explodes the myth that America’s cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation. Rather, The Color of Law incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation―the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments―that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.
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People with Disabilities: Sidelined or Mainstreamed?
Schur, Lisa. People with Disabilities: Sidelined or Mainstreamed?. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2013. View the BookAbstract
This book provides an overview of the progress and continuing disparities faced by people with disabilities around the world, reviewing hundreds of studies and presenting new evidence from analysis of surveys and interviews with disability leaders. It shows the connections among economic, political and social inclusion, and how the experience of disability can vary by gender, race and ethnicity. It uses a multidisciplinary approach, drawing on theoretical models and research in economics, political science, psychology, disability studies, law and sociology.
Deep Roots : How Slavery Still Shapes Southern Politics
Sen, Maya, Avidit Acharya, and Matthew Blackwell. Deep Roots : How Slavery Still Shapes Southern Politics. Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

While legislation such as the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act made huge strides in increasing economic opportunity and reducing educational disparities, southern slavery has had a profound, lasting, and self-reinforcing influence on regional and national politics that can still be felt today in the South.

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