Complete Collection

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Habib, Samra. We have always been here: a queer Muslim memoir. Toronto: Viking, an imprint of Penguin Canada, 2019.Abstract
"A queer Muslim searches for the language to express her truest self, making peace with her sexuality, her family, and Islam. Growing up in Pakistan, Samra Habib lacks a blueprint for the life she wants. She has a mother who gave up everything to be a pious, dutiful wife and an overprotective father who seems to conspire against a life of any adventure. Plus, she has to hide the fact that she's Ahmadi to avoid persecution from religious extremists. As the threats against her family increase, they seek refuge in Canada, where new financial and cultural obstacles await them. When Samra discovers that her mother has arranged her marriage, she must again hide a part of herself–the fun-loving, feminist teenager that has begun to bloom–until she simply can't any longer. So begins a journey of self-discovery that takes her to Tokyo, where she comes to terms with her sexuality, and to a queer-friendly mosque in Toronto, where she returns to her faith in the same neighbourhood where she attended her first drag show. Along the way, she learns that the facets of her identity aren't as incompatible as she was led to believe, and that her people had always been there–the world just wasn't ready for them yet."–
Hadjian, Avedis. Secret nation: the hidden Armenians of Turkey. London ; New York: I.B. Tauris, 2018.
Halkitis, Perry N. Out in time: the public lives of gay men from stonewall to the queer generation. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2019.
Hārithī, Jūkhah, and Marilyn Booth. Celestial bodies. New York: Catapult, 2019.Abstract
"In the village of al-Awafi in Oman, we encounter three sisters: Mayya, who marries after a heartbreak; Asma, who marries from a sense of duty; and Khawla, who chooses to refuse all offers and await a reunion with the man she loves, who has emigrated to Canada. These three women and their families, their losses and loves, unspool ... against a backdrop of a rapidly changing Oman, a country evolving from a traditional, slave-owning society into its complex present"–
Harjo, Joy. An American sunrise: poems. First edition. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2019.
Harkins, Anthony, and Meredith McCarroll, ed. Appalachian reckoning: a region responds to Hillbilly Elegy. First edition. Morgantown: West Virginia University Press, 2019.
Stories from the Front of the Room: How Higher Education Faculty of Color Overcome Challenges and Thrive in the Academy
Harris, Michelle, Sherrill L Sellers, Orly Clerge, and Frederick W. Jr. Gooding, ed. Stories from the Front of the Room: How Higher Education Faculty of Color Overcome Challenges and Thrive in the Academy. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017. View the BookAbstract
This book focuses on the boundaries which faculty of color encounter in everyday experiences on campus and presents a more complete picture of life in the academy - one that documents how faculty of color are tested, but also how they can not only overcome, but thrive in their respective educational institutions.
Hawkins, Ames. These are love(d) letters. Made in Michigan writers series. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2019.
Hobson, Brandon. The removed. First edition. New York, NY: Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2021.Abstract
"Steeped in Cherokee myths and history, a novel about a fractured family reckoning with the tragic death of their son long ago-from National Book Award finalist Brandon Hobson"–
Hong, Cathy Park. Minor feelings: an Asian American reckoning. First Edition. New York: One World, 2020.Abstract
"Asian Americans inhabit a purgatorial status: neither white enough nor black enough, unmentioned in most conversations about racial identity. In the popular imagination, Asian Americans are all high-achieving professionals. But in reality, this is the most economically divided group in the country, a tenuous alliance of people with roots from South Asia to East Asia to the Pacific Islands, from tech millionaires to service industry laborers. How do we speak honestly about the Asian American condition–if such a thing exists? Poet and essayist Cathy Park Hong fearlessly and provocatively confronts this thorny subject, blending memoir, cultural criticism, and history to expose the truth of racialized consciousness in America. Binding these essays together is Hong's theory of "minor feelings." As the daughter of Korean immigrants, Cathy Park Hong grew up steeped in shame, suspicion, and melancholy. She would later understand that these "minor feelings" occur when American optimism contradicts your own reality–when you believe the lies you're told about your own racial identity. With sly humor and a poet's searching mind, Hong uses her own story as a portal into a deeper examination of racial consciousness in America today. This intimate and devastating book traces her relationship to the English language, to shame and depression, to poetry and artmaking, and to family and female friendship. A radically honest work of art, Minor Feelings forms a portrait of one Asian American psyche–and of a writer's search to both uncover and speak the truth"–
Hubbard, Ladee. The rib king. New York: Amistad, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2021.Abstract
Begin 20ste eeuw leeft het zwarte huispersoneel schijnbaar kalm en tevreden bij de witte familie Barclays , maar dan wordt het recept van Maimie's saus inzet van een wraakactie.
Hudes, Quiara Alegría. My broken language: a memoir. First edition. New York: One World, 2021.Abstract
"Quiara Alegria Hudes was the sharp-eyed girl on the stairs while her family danced in her grandmother's tight South Philly kitchen, "frizzy hair cut short, bangs teased into stiff clouds, sweat glistening in the summer fog, pamper-butt babies weaving between legs." Quiara was awed by her aunts and uncles and cousins, but haunted by the secrets of the family and the unspoken stories of the barrio – even as she tried to find her own voice in the sea of language around her, written and spoken, English and Spanish, bodies and books, Western art and sacred altars. Her family became her private pantheon, a gathering of powerful orishas with tragic wounds and she vowed to tell their stories–but first she'd have to get off the stairs and join the dance; she'd have to find her langauge. This is an inspired exploration of home, family, memory, and belonging, narrated by the obsessed girl who fought to become an artist so she could capture the world she loved in all its wild and delicate beauty"–
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Imarisha, Walidah. Octavia's brood. Oakland, CA: AK Press, 2015.
Waking up White: And Finding Myself in the Story of Race
Irving, Debby. Waking up White: And Finding Myself in the Story of Race. Cambridge, MA: Elephant Room Press, 2014. View the BookAbstract
For twenty-five years, Debby Irving sensed inexplicable racial tensions in her personal and professional relationships. As a colleague and neighbor, she worried about offending people she dearly wanted to befriend. As an arts administrator, she didn't understand why her diversity efforts lacked traction. In Waking Up White, Irving tells her often cringe-worthy story with such openness that readers will turn every page rooting for her-and ultimately for all of us.
Islam, Tanwi Nandini. Bright lines. New York, New York: Penguin Books, 2015.
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Jarman, Michelle, Leila Frances Monaghan, and Alison Quaggin Harkin, ed. Barriers and belonging: personal narratives of disability. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2017.
Jefferson, Margo. Negroland: a memoir. First Vintage Books edition. New York: Vintage Books, 2016.Abstract
"At once incendiary and icy, mischievous, and provocative, celebratory and elegiac, a deeply felt meditation on race, sex, and American culture through the prism of the author's rarefied upbringing and education among a black elite concerned to distance itself from whites and the black generality, while tirelessly measuring itself against both. Born in 1947 in upper-crust black Chicago–her father was for years head of pediatrics at Provident, at the time the nation's oldest black hospital; her mother was a socialite–Margo Jefferson has spent most of her life among (call them what you will) the colored aristocracy, the colored elite, the blue-vein society. Since the nineteenth century they have stood apart, these inhabitants of Negroland, "a small region of Negro America where residents were sheltered by a certain amount of privilege and plenty." Reckoning with the strictures and demands of Negroland at crucial historical moments–the civil rights movement, the dawn of feminism, the fallacy of post-racial America–Jefferson brilliantly charts the twists and turns of a life informed by psychological and moral contradictions. Aware as it is of heart-wrenching despair and depression, this book is a triumphant paean to the grace of perseverance. (With 8 pages of black-and-white illustrations.)"–
Jenkins, Barry. “If Beale Street Could Talk.” Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment, 2019. Publisher's VersionAbstract
A timeless love story set in early 1970s Harlem involving newly engaged nineteen-year- old Tish and her fiance Fonny who have a beautiful future ahead. But their plans are derailed when Fonny is arrested for a crime he did not commit. Now the pair and their families must fight for justice in the name of love and the promise of the American dream.
Johnson, E. Dolores. Say I'm dead: a family memoir of race, secrets, and love. First edition. Chicago: Lawrence Hill Books, 2020.Abstract
"Fearful of violating Indiana's anti-miscegenation laws in the 1940s, E. Dolores Johnson's black father and white mother fled Indianapolis to secretly marry. Johnson searched her father's black genealogy and then was amazed to suddenly realize that her mother's whole white side was missing in family history. Johnson went searching for the white family who did not know she existed. When she found them, it's not just their shock and her mother's shame that have to be overcome, but her own fraught experiences with whites."–
Privilege, Power, and Difference
Johnson, Allan G. Privilege, Power, and Difference. Third edition. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education, 2018. View the BookAbstract
This short book is a tool for students and non-students alike to examine systems of privilege and difference in our society. Written in an accessible, conversational style, Johnson links theory with engaging examples in ways that enable readers to see the underlying nature and consequences of privilege and their connection to it.

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