Current Fellows

This list does not include personnel or interns belonging to individual labs, who are listed on their respective lab websites. We also encourage you to visit each lab website for a look at its research and publications.

 
 
Marie-Abèle Bind

Marie-Abèle Bind
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow

Bind Lab
Dept. of Statistics, Science Ctr.
6th Floor, 1 Oxford St., Rm. 608
Cambridge MA, 02138 USA
ma.bind@mail.harvard.edu

Marie-Abèle Bind is an environmental biostatistician interested in health effects from environmental exposures.

I am an independent Research Associate at the Department of Statistics, Harvard University. My research interests focus on developing causal inference methods for quantifying the effects of environmental exposures on health outcomes and understanding the mechanisms explaining these health effects. My research is funded by the NIH Early Independence Award program.
Alison Hill

Alison Hill
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow

Hill Lab
Program for Evolutionary Dynamics
1 Brattle Sq., Room 638
Cambridge MA, 02138 USA

alhill@fas.harvard.edu

Alison Hill - I am an independent Research Associate at the Program for Evolutionary Dynamics at Harvard. I study how infectious diseases spread, evolve, and respond to treatment using mathematical and computational methods. My work on HIV/AIDS is funded by the NIH Early Independence Award program and Harvard's Center for AIDS Research.

Nia Imara
Nia Imara
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow
 
Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St.
Room C-311D
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

Nia Imara is a John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow and the Harvard FAS Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. She received her PhD in astrophysics from UC Berkeley and her BA from Kenyon College.  

Nia’s research involves studying the structure and evolution of stellar nurseries in both the Milky Way Galaxy and other galaxies.  Her research bridges local and extragalactic star formation, as well as star formation in the cosmological context.

Nia works with the Banneker Institute at Harvard, and she is a member of the Breakthrough Starshot research team.

Kristen Koenig
Kristen M. Koenig
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow

Koenig Lab
Northwest Building, 52 Oxford St. #365.10
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
(+1) 617 384-7791
kmkoenig@fas.harvard.edu

Koenig Lab - Our lab is interested in the evolution and development of the visual system as a model to study the evolution of organ complexity.  We are interested in morphogenetic mechanisms involved in organ formation, neurogenesis and cell differentiation, as well as gene regulatory network evolution to understand how complex traits are generated.

The capacity for photoreception is a sensory tool evolved early in the animal kingdom. The extent of this capacity ranges from single photoreceptor cells, pigmented eyespots and cups, to complicated organs that focus, reflect and absorb light to resolve images. In the Bilateria, high-resolution vision is known to have evolved in only a few animal groups including vertebrates, arthropods and cephalopods.  Currently our work focuses on the formation of the cephalopod eye using the squid Doryteuthis pealeii as a model.

Kristen's research is funded by the NIH Early Independence Award program.

 

More about Kristen's work can be seen on her research website: https://www.koenig-lab.com/

Mathieu Lapotre
Mathieu Lapotre
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow
 
Lapotre Lab
Geological Museum,  24 Oxford St. Room #364
Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA

Mathieu Lapotre - In our own solar system, terrestrial planets attest to the volatility of habitability through their respective geologic records. Through a variety of approaches such as field and lab studies, planetary exploration data analysis, and analog and numerical modeling, I aim at unraveling the physics of sedimentary processes that shape the surfaces of terrestrial planets, including Earth, and ultimately, what their landforms and rocks tell us about past hydrology, climate, and habitability.

Although I have broad interests across planetary bodies of our solar system and beyond, my work on planetary surface processes largely focuses on Earth and Mars. Three main goals of my research are to: (1) Further our mechanistic understanding of sedimentary and erosional processes on Earth, (2) explore how planetary conditions affect surface processes and their record in sedimentary rocks, and (3) constrain the paleohydrology, paleoclimate, and habitability of planets from physics-based interpretations of their sedimentary records.

More about Mathieu's work can be seen on his research website:
Mor Nitzan
Mor Nitzan
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow
 
Nitzan Lab
Northwest Building, 52 Oxford St., #365.30
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
(+1) 617 384-7631

Mor Nitzan - I am interested in studying the emergence of complex behavior out of the interactions of simple dynamic units, using concepts derived from nonlinear dynamics, machine learning, and statistical physics. Specifically, my research evolves around aspects of the interplay between structure and dynamics in such systems, including network reconstruction (revealing the existence and possibly type of interactions within a network based on the collective dynamics of its units) and network design (constructing a system, out of a given set of building blocks, that satisfies certain structural and dynamical properties).

I employ these approaches for the elucidation of fundamental laws emerging out of biological complexity. TIn the past I have focused on genes and their products that interact via different types of regulations to form regulatory networks underlying cellular function. I am now extending my focus to study interacting cells that form tissues and the ways by which these interactions determine the global state of the functioning (or dysfunctioning) tissue.

More about Mor's work can be seen on her research website:
Sergey Ovchinnikov
Sergey Ovchinnikov
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow
 
Ovchinnikov Lab
Northwest Building, 52 Oxford St., #365.20
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
(+1) 617 384-9456
so@fas.harvard.edu

Sergey Ovchinnikov - For billions of years, nature has been conducting the greatest experiment of all time. Imagine one-day gaining access to the detailed notes from these experiments. Today, with worldwide expeditions to collect samples from all habitats, single-cell sequencing of unculturable microbes and the rapid drop in sequencing costs, we can finally tap into nature and gain access to these notes.


Making use of this data, Sergey's lab is interested in 1) Developing an improved and unified statistical model of protein evolution; 2) Applying the model to mine metagenomic “dark matter” sequences to discover new protein families, functions, and protein-protein interactions; 3) Probing the evolution of multicellularity through comparison of structures and interactions in the early tree of life.

Sergey's research is funded by the NIH Early Independence Award program.

Sergey Ovchinnikov is currently seeking a post doctoral fellow in structural and evolutionary biology. Go here for more information.

More about Sergey's work can be seen on his research websitesolab.org
Andrew Seeber

Andrew Seeber
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow

Seeber Lab
Center for Advanced Imaging
Northwest Building, 52 Oxford St., Suite 147
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
(+1) 617 496-0993  aseeber@fas.harvard.edu

Andrew Seeber – DNA contained in the cell is wrapped around histones to form nucleosomes, which are compacted into higher order chromatin structures. The DNA within chromatin must be made accessible for many DNA-based transactions to occur including transcription, replication and DNA repair. An important property of DNA, which is often overlooked, is that it is not static. Rather, it moves within the cell. The origin and function of this movement remain mysterious and cannot be explained solely by Brownian motion. The problem is further complicated by forces that act on the nucleus, generated by microtubules and actin fibers. However, we do know that molecular machines called chromatin remodelers can change the shape and organization of DNA and influence its dynamics.
 
My laboratory focuses on understanding how changes in chromatin structure modulate its dynamics and impact its function. We develop new microscopy techniques and analysis methods to study chromatin in living human cells and apply these techniques to biological questions. In particular, we study how chromatin dynamics affect DNA repair. This ultimately allows us to better understand the processes that lead to DNA mis-repair, mutations and translocations.
Paul Shamble

Paul Shamble
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow

Shamble Lab
Northwest Building, 52 Oxford St., #359.30
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
(+1) 617 496-1077
paul_shamble@fas.harvard.edu

Paul Shamble - Our research focuses on mimics--species that experience reduced predation because they have evolved some similarity to another animal. Examples include non-venomous snakes with the ringed patterns of their deadly cousins, or harmless flies with the yellow stripes of wasps or bees. This phenomenon has captivated scientists for centuries and is often considered one of the most powerful and accessible examples of evolution by natural selection.

My work focuses on jumping spiders that have evolved to mimic ants, and my lab takes quantitative and experimental approaches to understanding mimicry. I am particularly interested in exploring the role of dynamic traits, and in developing new methods to investigate how such traits influence predator behavior. My work relies on techniques and approaches from multiple disciplines, including animal behavior and communication, biomechanics, and neurobiology. I am also interested in sensory physiology, perception, and processing, as well as locomotion, and neuroethology--particularly of invertebrates.
Uri Vool

Uri Vool
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow

Vool Lab
Dept of Physics, 11 Oxford St., #615B
Cambridge, MA 02138 USA
(+1) 617 495-8206
uri_vool@fas.harvard.edu

Uri Vool - A topological superconductor is a novel phase of matter which exhibits macroscopic coherent quantum mechanical behavior. Such materials can support excitations known as Majorana fermions – particles with unique exchange statistics which have no observed free-space analog. They are particularly important for quantum computing since their special exchange properties can be used to perform quantum operations, while their topological invariance makes them insensitive to local dissipation. This insensitivity, however, also makes these elusive states difficult to measure.
 
Our research aims at studying the internal dynamics of these materials, using a cryogenic magnetic sensor based on a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond. The quantum coherence and magnetic field sensitivity of this atom-size particle can allow us to gain access the spatial and temporal components of the protected quantum states within the topological superconductor. Specifically, we aim to study Josephson junctions created from these novel materials by measuring the magnetic field generated by the AC Josephson effect. Currently, we are characterizing the properties of "typical" Josephson junctions using our (NV) sensor, before proceeding to study the properties of the novel topological junctions.
Dushan Wadduwage

Dushan Wadduwage
John Harvard Distinguished Science Fellow

Wadduwage Lab
Center for Advanced Imaging
Northwest Building, 52 Oxford St., Suite 147, Room 146.10
Cambridge MA, 02138 USA
(+1) 617 496-0978
wadduwage@fas.harvard.edu

Dushan Wadduwage - Our lab is interested in developing new computational microscopy technologies through seamless integration of optics and computational algorithms. We utilize tools in compressive sensing, information theory, and machine learning alongside with optical engineering to design and build next-generation instruments to advance biological sciences and to improve medical practices. 
 
Dushan Wadduwage is currently seeking a post doctoral fellow in Machine Learning and Computational Microscopy. Go here for more information.
 
More about Dushan's work can be seen on his personal website: https://dushan.mit.edu/.