READING LISTS

The group meets weekly to discuss macro papers (focused on recent work on heterogeneous agents and the interplay between macro theory and micro data). Click on links to see scheduled presenters, collective comments, and slide archives.

Spring 2020 (Straub, Farhi). Topics: (1) Macro-Labor: Unemployment, and Sticky Wages, (2) Macro-IO: Production Networks, Firms, Markups, and Concentration, (3) Inflation, Monetary and Asset Prices, (4) Innatention.

Fall 2019 (Straub, Gabaix). Topics: (1) Firm Dynamics, Financial Frictions, and Misallocation, (2) Household Behavior, HANK, and Optimal Policy, (3) Labor and Regional Markets, (4) Sufficient Statistics.

GROUND RULES

Contact Martin Aragoneses (maragoneses@g.harvard.edu) and/or Ludwig Straub (ludwigstraub@fas.harvard.edu) with questions or to request to be added to the mailing list

  • You must commit to read (or at the very least skim) the paper beforehand, and come up with answers to 
    1. What you liked about the paper and what you think the contribution is 
    2. What you didn't like about the paper and questions to the presenter on things you didn't understand
  •  Before each session, each student needs to email answers to presenters, CC'ing faculty and student organizers
  • Paper presentations last 40 minutes (presenters should arrive ahead of time to set up their own slides)
    • Questions during the talk are not only highly encouraged but active participation is expected of everyone!
    • After the presentation there is a 10 min collective open discussion on the paper to collect people's thoughts 
  • Invited attendants must apply for a presention slot at the beginning of the semester; you can try pairing up with presenters once the schedule is up. In some cases we allow people not to present as long as they are actively participate. 

"MACRO TEA" PILOT

We want active participants to enjoy the right to take the group's time/brainspace and share something they have been working on and want some quick feedback before you present at the lunch to encourage low-stakes risk-taking over the semester. Please take that opportunity up, and try out the ideas you never felt quite confident enough to give a lunch talk on!

  • After a session, a student gives a short 10 minute un-interrupted presentation on an original early-stage idea
    • This is meant to be very informal with minimal to no slides (0-5 max, or sketching on the board)
  • This is followed by an open, constructive discussion by all interested students/faculty
    • We must all do our best to brainstorm with presenters on how to push the ideas the furthest!
  • Ocassionally, the day's paper presenter could also pitch an idea sparked by their deep dive on the paper
    • If the day's presenter does not claim the spot, we open the spot to students who actively participate
  • Students interested in pitching an idea to the group should send us an email well in advance (no later than the week before).