Oracle of Delphi Welsh

Men would travel to Delphi with questions about the future to consult Apollo through an Oracle, who was usually a middle-aged woman. The Oracle was said to take on an entranced state and answer the questions simply.  For more information on the Oracle of Delphi, click on the following link: https://courses.edx.org/courses/course-v1:HarvardX+SOC1.practx+1T2017/courseware/687bae4b7e4b468c9be25909c26527f3/42b8efef14584772a76f058b632d5493/11?activate_block_id=block-v1%3AHarvardX%2BSOC1.practx%2B1T2017%2Btype%40vertical%2Bblock%405adab136887b4e959ec0fb9b4d7b193c

 

The Oracle of Delphi is clearly a human predictive system which was not always accurate. The oracle tended to give very interpretive answers so that no matter what the outcome was, there could be some truth to the prediction. One classic example includes the King of Lydia who came to the Oracle asking what would happen if he waged war on the Persians. The Oracle responded by saying that he will destroy a kingdom by doing so and, of course, the kingdom that she referred to turned out to be his own. This example shows how the accuracy of the Oracle could not be evaluated because of her vagueness and, therefore, how the predictive system was not a reliable one.

 

Men who sought out the Oracle believed that she had the answers to what the future held. If they knew what would happen if they chose a certain path in life, they could choose to follow that path or to avoid it. In this way, the men would exercise their free will by making the choice which was most beneficial to them based on what the oracle had told them. However, the Oracle seemed to help the men sort out their thoughts and make decisions rather than truly predict the future.