visualization

WorldWide Telescope

WorldWide Telescope is a "Universe Information System" created by Microsoft Research that our group helps to develop and deploy.  In the Seamless Astronomy program, we use WWT as an excellent all-sky, smoothly zoom-able data visualizer, as well as a key link to full VAO functionality.  In a Read more about WorldWide Telescope

Development of "3D" Milky Way Viewer

Our group has begun experimenting with combinations of glue, dendrograms, and WorldWide Telescope, in order to bring new 3D interactive views of the Milky Way to researchers, and to the public.  This page hosts a glimpse of that in-progress project.  It will ultimately be deployed via universe3d.org

An early video is here, and more will follow!

Our perceptual limits in reading and interpreting visualizations (Arzu Çöltekin, Zurich)

Our perceptual limits in reading and interpreting visualizations (Arzu Çöltekin, Zurich)

August 18, 2014

Visualizations help us in interpreting and communicating complex concepts and rich data. However, we have a number of perceptual and cognitive limitations that counter-intuitively work against us when we work with visualizations. These limitations lead to critical mistakes, e.g., in interpreting patterns or simply reading information from a graphic. What are these culprits and how can we avoid them? This talk by Arzu Coltekin (Zurich) offers an overview of the state of the art knowledge about scientific visualizations from a design perspective to Read more about Our perceptual limits in reading and interpreting visualizations (Arzu Çöltekin, Zurich)

2014 Aug 18

Seamless Colloquium: Our perceptual limits in reading and interpreting visualizations

2:00pm

Location: 

Phillips Auditorium

Abstract: Visualizations help us in interpreting and communicating complex concepts and rich data. However, we have a number of perceptual and cognitive limitations that counter-intuitively work against us when we work with visualizations. These limitations lead to critical mistakes, e.g., in interpreting patterns or simply reading information from a graphic. What are these culprits and how can we avoid them? This talk by Arzu Coltekin (Zurich) offers an overview of the state Read more about Seamless Colloquium: Our perceptual limits in reading and interpreting visualizations

Linking Visualization & Understanding in Astronomy (Alyssa Goodman, Harvard)

Linking Visualization & Understanding in Astronomy (Alyssa Goodman, Harvard)

February 10, 2014

In 1610, when Galileo pointed his small telescope at Jupiter, he drew sketches to record what he saw. After just a few nights of observing, he understood his sketches to be showing moons orbiting Jupiter. It was the visualization of Galileo’s observations that led to his understanding of a clearly Sun-centered solar system, and to the revolution this understanding then caused. Read more about Linking Visualization & Understanding in Astronomy (Alyssa Goodman, Harvard)

Concerning Astrophotography (Vicent Peris, Valencia)

Concerning Astrophotography (Vicent Peris, Valencia)

June 26, 2014

In this talk, Vicent Peris reviewed his works in the astrophotography and image processing disciplines. Working as astrophotographer at the Astronomical Observatory of the University of Valencia, he leads an astrophotography project at Calar Alto Observatory in southern Spain. This is the first astrophotography project in the world with access to the observational time of professional telescopes (about 50 night per year). Along with this project, he is also co-founder of the Documentary School of Astrophotography, the first school of thought in the astrophotography discipline.
Read more about Concerning Astrophotography (Vicent Peris, Valencia)

Alyssa Goodman: Star Formation & Visualization at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, at Harvard-Heidelberg Workshop 2014, Monday, June 23, 2014:

This 45-minute talk by Alyssa Goodman offered an introduction to CfA Research on Star Formation and Data Visualization at the first Annual Harvard-Heidelberg workshop in June 2014.

Links

Alyssa Goodman: Linking Visualization & Understanding in Astronomy, at CFA, Cambridge, MA, Monday, February 10, 2014

Abstract

In 1610, when Galileo pointed his small telescope at Jupiter, he drew sketches to record what he saw. After just a few nights of observing, he understood his sketches to be showing moons orbiting Jupiter. It was the visualization of Galileo’s observations that led to his understanding of a clearly Sun-centered solar system, and to the revolution this understanding then caused. Similar stories can be found throughout the history of Astronomy, but visualization has never been so essential as it is today, when we find ourselves blessed with a larger Read more about Alyssa Goodman: Linking Visualization & Understanding in Astronomy

2014 Feb 10

Seamless Colloquium: Linking Visualization & Understanding in Astronomy

Registration Closed2:00pm

Location: 

Phillips Auditorium, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street

In 1610, when Galileo pointed his small telescope at Jupiter, he drew sketches to record what he saw. After just a few nights of observing, he understood his sketches to be showing moons orbiting Jupiter. It was the visualization of Galileo’s observations that led to his understanding of a clearly Sun-centered solar system, and to the revolution this understanding then caused. Similar stories can be found throughout the history of Astronomy, but visualization has never been so essential as it is today, when we find ourselves blessed with a larger wealth and diversity of data, per Read more about Seamless Colloquium: Linking Visualization & Understanding in Astronomy

Goodman AA. Principles of High-Dimensional Data Visualization in Astronomy. Astronomische Nachrichten [Internet]. 2012;333 (5-6) :505-514. Astrobites commentary on this articleAbstract

sets, though, interactive exploratory data visualization can give far more insight than an approach where data processing
and statistical analysis are followed, rather than accompanied, by visualization. This paper attempts to charts a course
toward “linked view” systems, where multiple views of high-dimensional data sets update live as a researcher selects,
highlights, or otherwise manipulates, one of several open views. For example, imagine a researcher looking at a 3D volume
visualization of simulated or observed data, and simultaneously viewing statistical displays of the data set’s properties
(such as an x-y plot of temperature vs. velocity, or a histogram of vorticities). Then, imagine that when the researcher
selects an interesting group of points in any one of these displays, that the same points become a highlighted subset in
all other open displays. Selections can be graphical or algorithmic, and they can be combined, and saved. For tabular
(ASCII) data, this kind of analysis has long been possible, even though it has been under-used in Astronomy. The bigger
issue for Astronomy and several other “high-dimensional” fields is the need systems that allow full integration of images
and data cubes within a linked-view environment. The paper concludes its history and analysis of the present situation
with suggestions that look toward cooperatively-developed open-source modular software as a way to create an evolving,
flexible, high-dimensional, linked-view visualization environment useful in astrophysical research.

Alyssa Goodman: 21-st Century Research: Tools, Trends, and Transformation, at Eliot House, Harvard University, Tuesday, April 10, 2012:

Abstract: 

By highlighting some new technologies and trends (such as WorldWide Telescope, the sharing of visualization and analysis techniques between seemingly disparate fields like Astronomy and Medicine, and new online research, data-mining and collaboration tools), I will speculate on the transformation in the participation in and pace of research to come.
(This was a "live" interactive presentation requested by members of The Read more about Alyssa Goodman: 21-st Century Research: Tools, Trends, and Transformation
Alyssa Goodman: Seeing Science: Data Visualization in Modern Research and Teaching, at Paris, France , Wednesday, November 9, 2011:

This talk was delivered at the Harvard Business School's European Research Centre, to the members of the Harvard Club of France, and their guests.

ABSTRACT: Long ago, data visualization was  niche art, practiced only by those deeply committed to the power of visual communication.  Today, though, with the increasing volumes of data available not only to scientists, but to all, there is  rapidly increasing interest--and capability--in the visual exploration and explanation of data.  In this talk, Goodman will bring some of what she teaches Harvard Read more about Alyssa Goodman: Seeing Science: Data Visualization in Modern Research and Teaching