Doctoral Fellows Program

The Doctoral Fellowship is a competitive two-year fellowship that provides exposure, intellectual training, and skill set for doctoral students interested in issues related to science, religion, and culture. The fellowship provides an opportunity to broaden a doctoral candidate’s area of expertise and enhance their competitiveness and professional reach. In particular, doctoral fellows are trained in science studies (including the History of Science and Science and Technology Studies) and/or religious studies broadly conceived. Candidates may come from any discipline if they are interested in either of these two fields, or their intersection.

Fellowship Requirements

Research Project:

In their first year of the fellowship, doctoral fellows are expected to develop a focused research project with two final outputs:

1. Journal submission: Fellows produce an article for submission to a peer-reviewed journal to be identified in consultation with Professor Ragab.  

2. Conference presentation: Fellows present their research to the community at the SRC annual symposium.

SRC Colloquium and Work-in-Progress (WiP) talks:

Fellows attend and participate in the biweekly SRC colloquium. The colloquium meets every other Thursday from 6-8pm. Fellows present their completed research at the Colloquium during their second year.

In addition to the colloquium, and as part of developing their project, fellows are expected to participate in closed Work-in-Progress(WiP) talks, where each fellow workshops their drafts with other fellows and the faculty director. Each fellow will present two different drafts (at two different stages) of their work in two different WiPs.

Syllabus Design:

In their second year, fellows develop a syllabus and a course plan (or a teaching statement) in their target field or discipline. The syllabi are developed in close consultation with Professor Ragab.

 

Applying for the Doctoral Fellows Program

Applications for the 2017-2019 Doctoral Fellows Program are now being accepted.

To apply for the program, please submit the following materials:

a. Statement of purpose: A cover letter of 1–2 pages explaining your interest in the study of science, religion, and culture, and why you would like to be a part of this program specifically. The SoP should also include a description of the project you will pursue during the fellowship.

b. Curriculum vitae

c. Writing sample: please submit a paper of about 15 pages.

Send your application as a single PDF to SRCP@hds.harvard.edu

Review of applications starts on May 15, 2017. 

Rob Ames

Rob Ames

Doctoral Fellow, 2015-2017

Rob is a Ph.D. candidate in the department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. His dissertation focuses on the relationship between mysticism and modernist social thought in Qajar Iran, with particular concern for both fields’ treatments of subjectivity. … Read more about Rob Ames

Doug Bafford

Doug Bafford

Doctoral Fellow, 2016-2018

Doug Bafford is a doctoral student in anthropology at Brandeis University. His research poses questions within the anthropology of religion, particularly how people negotiate alternative ways of knowing and how the religious sphere carries over into other dimensions of social life. … Read more about Doug Bafford

Margaretha Blignaut

Margaretha Blignaut

Doctoral Fellow, 2016-2018

Margaretha Blignaut is a third-year doctoral student in the department of Anthropology. Her research focuses on the production and circulation of heritage claims, with a particular emphasis on the ways in which the evidentiary terrain of Roma heritage claims are being impacted by population genetic scholarship and the dynamics of heritage regimes across Europe. 

Khytie Brown

Khytie Brown

Doctoral Fellow, 2015-2017
Coordinator, Ways of Knowing Annual Conference

Khytie Brown is a third year doctoral student in the department of African and African American Studies with a primary field in Religion. Her research emphasis is on religious expression and cultural production in the Caribbean and Afro-Antillean Panama, with particular attention to sensory epistemologies, disruptions of the sacred/profane binary, mediation, Afrophobia and the interplay between private religious discourses and public space. … Read more about Khytie Brown

Mariam Goshadze

Mariam Goshadze

Doctoral Fellow, 2016-2018

Mariam Goshadze is a doctoral student in the Committee on the Study of Religion who works on indigenous religion in Ghana’s capital, Accra. Her research is at the crossroads of sensory anthropology, historical analysis, urban anthropology and sonic studies. … Read more about Mariam Goshadze

Wythe Marschall

Wythe Marschall

Coordinator, Junior Fellows Program
Doctoral Fellow, 2016-2018

Wythe Marschall is a PhD candidate in the History of Science Department at Harvard, where he studies biotechnology and farming. Currently, Wythe is teaching science fiction and researching how biotech startups are trying to disrupt the food economy and, in doing so, changing how we relate to the nonhumans that make our food. … Read more about Wythe Marschall

Heather McLetchie-Leader

Heather McLetchie-Leader

Doctoral Fellow, 2015-2017
Coordinator, Ways of Knowing Annual Conference

Heather McLetchie-Leader is a Ph.D. candidate in the study of religion at Harvard University. Her research, which focuses on marriage in Greco-Roman antiquity, engages questions of social justice, as well as the politicization of difference and experience. … Read more about Heather McLetchie-Leader

Eli Nelson

Eli Nelson

Research Officer, Environment and Sustainability
Doctoral Fellow, 2015-2017

Eli is a PhD candidate in the History of Science department at Harvard and a graduate student associate of the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs. He studies the history of native science in settler colonial and postcolonial contexts. … Read more about Eli Nelson

Caitlyn Olson

Caitlyn Olson

Doctoral Fellow, 2016-2018

Caitlyn became interested in Arabic-Islamic history as an undergraduate at Middlebury College, where she earned her BA in Religion in 2009. A subsequent Fulbright grant to Morocco confirmed her enthusiasm for the Arabic language and academic research, and a year working with the writing program at NYU Abu Dhabi made her equally excited about teaching. … Read more about Caitlyn Olson

Andre Uhl

Andre Uhl

Doctoral Fellow, 2016-2018

Andre Uhl is a Ph.D. student at the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard GSAS. His doctoral research explores the psychology of technology and the emergence and scope of post-humanism, in particular with regards to the exponential growth of networks, computing systems, and A.I.… Read more about Andre Uhl