Finding Heaven Under Our Feet: Making Modern Dance Transcript by Chris Engles

[WAVES WASHING UP ON SHORE]
A silhouette of a boy on a swing, looking out at a body of water at sunset. On screen, the words "JAN 70 / ONE TAKE."
Fade to black.

[CITY AMBIENCE]
A city skyline at night featuring skyscrapers with lit windows, a bridge spanning a wide river. A subway train with lit windows crosses the bridge.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "In 2012 a Boston-area choreographer and the modern dance company she leads embarked on a project."
The words fade and are replaced with: "She wanted to explore our culture's increasing detachment from the natural world as a way to open dialogue about climate change."
The words fade and are replaced with: "Over a three-year period they developed an evening-length work and a series of site-specific solo dances performed in Juneau, Alaska that speak to this subject."
The words fade and are replaced with: "This is their journey."

[CITY AMBIENCE]
A city street at night, the viewer is looking from one side of a busy street to the other at a crosswalk.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "The Dance Complex, Cambridge, MA"

[MUSIC PLAYING]
A dance studio, brightly lit, dancers stretch and move on the floor.
On screen, words and white letters appear: "JAN 70 / ONE TAKE MEDIA PRESENTS"

[MUSIC PLAYING]
A woman in a balcony above the scene, adjusting a stage light.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "A CHRIS ENGLES FILM"

WOMAN: Something like this Chris? Straight on?
CHRIS [off screen]: Yeah.

Women in shiny dance costumes move around on a stage, in rehearsal.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "WITH WEBER DANCE"

WOMAN [off screen]: Yeah. Yeah.

A woman in a blue shirt helps one of the dancers with adjusting her costume at the back.

DANCER: Is that better?
DR. JODY WEBER: Yes.
DANCER: OK. So we're going to go. We're gonna go.

The dancer gestures to other female dancers around her about the choreography.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: In the very beginning section, there's text about a flower.
DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: I'm going to play it for you.

Screen cuts to a sheet of notebook paper, with notes in blue ink.

WOMAN'S RECORDED VOICE [off screen]: Five red orange flowers on long stalks nodding downward at their apex. The throat of the flower was creamy with purple specks.

Screen cuts back to the stage with dancers and the woman in a blue shirt on a black stage.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "ARTISTIC DIRECTOR DR. JODY WEBER"

WOMAN'S RECORDED VOICE [off screen, continues]: This bright beauty opened its face a fortnight before.
DR. JODY WEBER: This bright beauty opened its face.

[MULTIPLE VOICES]
Another view of the dance stage. Women move on and off the stage.

WOMAN [off screen]: Lights out.

Fade to black.

[TRAIN WHISTLE]
On screen, words in white letters appear: "FINDING HEAVEN UNDER OUR FEET, MAKING MODERN DANCE"
Fade to black.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Lights slowly illuminate a dance stage, revealing a standing female dancer facing four sitting female dancers. The standing dancer removes an outer layer of clothing while the dancers on the stage floor move and stretch, slowly.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: One of the things that has characterized the kind of dance that I do, contemporary dance, is that it has the ability to thematically take on issues of the day in which it's being produced. So when you look at the advent of the form, you're looking at women's rights, you're looking at seeing the body in a different way, you're looking at freedom of movement, you're looking at a reflection on what is happening in the world around.

Dancers continue to dance, slowly fading to an image of the Earth.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: So for me, as an artist, the most important thing in my lifetime has to do with our relationship to the planet, has to do with what we are doing to the environment we live in and why we're making those choices.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Image of the earth fades to a beach littered with garbage. This image fades to a smoggy, industrial skyline.
Image fades back to the dancers on stage, now standing and dancing in unison.
Screen cuts to a brightly lit dance studio with a wall-length-mirror. The camera is pitched low, watching dancers' feet move together.
Screen cuts to a black and white still image of dancers on a black stage, a woman dressed all in black in front, center.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: And I'm just one small person, I'm not a scientist. I can't fix it. I can't come up with clean energy that's going to solve it. I don't have any of those skills. So what I've been trying to do with this language of movement, my small world that I have, is to ask the question, why are we making these decisions?

As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the image on screen cuts to a satellite image of icecaps melting.
On screen, the words "Beaufort Sea, Alaska"
Image cuts to a still of dancers dressed as scientists on stage. Cut to another image of dancers moving against a backdrop of code, which fades to an image of the Earth.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
In a brightly lit dance studio, dancers rehearse.
The camera cuts to the dancers' moving feet.
[BELL RINGS]

Screen cuts to Dr. Jody Weber facing the camera. She is sitting in a living room.
On screen, words in white letters: "DR. JODY WEBER, WEBER DANCE"

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: I started this piece when I read the research that came out of Thoreau's journals from Walden Pond about bloom times of plants.

Camera cuts to image of Henry D. Thoreau's title page of WALDEN; OR, LIFE IN THE WOODS.
Image cuts to handwriting, possibly Thoreau's.
Image fades to a pond.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: The scientists compared those notes to contemporary knowledge about bloom times and the recollection and found out, in fact, things are blooming about three weeks earlier than it was in Thoreau's time. And that is a dramatic change in the scope of what's happening with spring.

As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the image of the pond cuts to other woodland images of trees and flowers blooming. The images fade back to the dance studio with dancers in rehearsal.
[MUSIC PLAYING]

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: So I started the piece there. But because my company is all women, I was looking for a way to have that conversation in an artistic work from a feminine perspective.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Scene of rehearsing dancers cuts back to Dr. Jody Weber as she speaks, then back to the black dance stage. Dancers in costumes move slowly, together and apart.
Camera fades to an image of a woman at a factory loom, perhaps around the turn of the twentieth century.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: So I thought about the women of the mills and how they were engaged in making fabrics and how that industrialization led to the accumulation of store bought things, which didn't really exist beforehand, and how that has changed our world.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Film of old factory looms moving, colorizing into the modern age.
Camera fades back to the black dance stage, dancers in shiny costumes dance energetically.
[BELL RINGS]

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: I was trying to imagine what it would be like to have a conversation across time. If we could talk with those people, those generations before, what would be their perspective be? And if they could talk with us, how surprised would they be at the outcomes?

Camera cuts back to the black dance stage. A spotlight shines on a woman in turn-of-the-century dress.

MAN'S RECORDED VOICE [off screen]: Regulations to be observed by all persons employed in the factories.
WOMAN'S RECORDED VOICE [off screen]: If you could know how sultry it is here and how fatigued I am by my work in this warm weather, you would understand why I want to be home and to go down by the brook and sit by the cool spring.
MAN'S RECORDED VOICE [off screen]: Anyone who shall take from the mills or the yard, any yarn, cloth, or other article belonging to the company, will be considered guilty of stealing and liable to prosecution.

SHANNON HUMPHREYS [off screen]: Jody's process is very collaborative.

Screen cuts to Shannon Humphreys facing the camera.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "SHANNON HUMPHREYS, WEBER DANCE"

SHANNON HUMPHREYS [on screen]: A lot of times, she'll come in with movement vocabulary that she gives to us. But a lot of times, she gives us an assignment and then we find our own way of saying what she wants to say. I love that. I love that we have the freedom to solve those problems together. Lots of talking through what she wants to accomplish with each work. In the end, I am the paint, I'm the paint brush, I'm the material that she has to work with.

As Shannon is speaking, the video cuts between her facing the camera and scenes of dancers with Dr. Jody Weber, rehearsing in a brightly lit dance studio.

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: Stepping. Careful.

SHANNON HUMPHREYS [off screen]: And hopefully, I'm able to help her say what she wants to say.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Camera cuts to closed elevator doors from the outside. The elevator door opens, revealing a barefoot woman in a red dress, her back facing outwards. She begins to dance inside the elevator.
The camera cuts to a small conference room. The dancer in the red dress is dancing on top of the conference table. The room's curtains rise revealing bright sunlight.
The camera cuts to a small field in a city park, where the dancer in the red dress is lying down in the grass, moving rhythmically.
The camera cuts to a raised pedestrian walking path, where the dancer in the red dress is lying on the walkway, dancing. The Boston Tobin Bridge is visible nearby, in the background. Two people watch the dancer from a distance. The dancer rises from the ground.
The camera cuts to a shore by a waterfall. The dancer is wearing a red shirt and pants, black shoes, and is energetically dancing on the shore.
The camera jumps back to reveal more of the waterfall and the cliff it is cascading from. The dancer stands before the waterfall on the shore and continues to dance, then stops.
[WATERFALL]

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Screen cuts to a close-up image of a group of people wearing backpacks, seen from behind. They are looking at a snow-capped mountain.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: I went to Alaska in 2004. That visit to Alaska completely changed the course of my work as a choreographer.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Images of snow-capped mountains near bodies of water appear and fade out on screen.
Image fades to Dr. Jody Weber in a lifejacket, standing in front of a helicopter.

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: I was out in the tundra, and I happened to be out there at the same time as a paleoclimatologist who is doing work. He did a little informal talk for a couple of us and started talking about what they were learning about global warming through his research. And I have been aware, certainly we were all aware at that point, but there was something astounding about what was said in that environment that moved me very, very deeply. And when I came back and continued to make dances, almost all of my dances took a turn to looking at our relationship to the environment.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, more images of snow-capped mountains and melting ice fade on and off screen.
Images of female dancers also fade on and off screen.

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: I started to really think about what has led us to have the relationship we have with the planet. Why are we in this position? Why are we cut off? What's happened to us?

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the camera cuts to a video of people walking along a shore by water.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: Alaska was the place that changed me deeply, powerfully as an artist. Two years after that, I had this amazing opportunity to come here and work.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
People walk on the shore by a waterfall.
Video fades to a photo of a girl in a dance costume.

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: I started dancing when I was three years old. But because I started so young, I don't know what drew me in the first place to become a dancer. But I know from the time I was eight years old, I was already talking about that's what I wanted to do. So it's always been a pull for me. I think that I can say as an adult that the pull has to do with the way that it integrates our physicality with our mind and our spirit. It's like this perfect circle of being and expression. I had dabbled a little bit after I was introduced to modern dance with choreography at the end of high school. But when I actually got to study sort of the nuts and bolts of how it was done, I just have found that it's such an engaging practice. And I've never made a dance ever in my life that hasn't taught me something about making dances. And so every time I finish making a dance, I want to make another dance and apply what I learned. It's never an art form that you feel like you got there. You just are always growing, always learning. It's really powerful that way.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the camera cuts between her speaking, black and white images of Dr. Weber dancing as a girl, video of Dr. Weber coaching modern dancers in a brightly lit dance studio, and images of dancers on a black stage.

[INDISTINCT VOICES AND MUSIC]
In a brightly lit dance studio, Dr. Jody Weber sits with five dancers, some standing, some sitting.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "MASS MOTION DANCE, BOSTON, MA"
The camera cuts to dancers in the studio rehearsing.
A female dancer in a purple shirt rehearses some moves with her arms, while Shannon Humphreys looks on.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: Pull up, pull up. Yeah.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: I tried in this piece to align a woman from the Lowell mills who was working and had no idea what the impact of what she was doing would have on society. I'm sure she couldn't have imagined the kind of closets that we have today full of things, all of us. So that woman with a contemporary woman who has all those things and is bombarded with that. And to float somewhere in the middle this idea of reconnecting to the woods, reconnecting to a life in the natural world as the thing that's missing.

[INDISTINCT VOICES]
As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the camera cuts between her speaking and video of Dr. Weber coaching dancers in a brightly lit dance studio.

[SOUNDS OF LOOMS]
Dancers on a black stage dance in shiny costumes.

WOMAN'S RECORDED VOICE [off screen]: Saturday, shopping day, and my closet spins a color wheel of choices. Hats topple from the top shelf. My boot boxes make a mountain. Sultry perfume on a scarf finds my nose. I moved to open the window where the fresher perfume of spring hovers. Could I leave my house in my slip? Run through the gentle grass? Plunge into the brook? Instead, I will dress and spend my day walking gleaming tiled floors, searching for more colors to add to my wheel. How lonely that prospect suddenly feels.

KRISTY KUHN [off screen]: I'm often asked what type of dance I teach or study or perform. And when I say modern dance, a lot of people aren't familiar with what that is.

The video cuts to Kristy Kuhn facing the camera.
On screen, words in white letters: "KRISTY KUHN, WEBER DANCE"

KRISTY KUHN [on screen]: So I do feel an obligation to try and educate them on what modern dance is. It's a bit challenging at times because you can't really define modern dance in a few words. But I do my best to try and share that it is, you know, a wide ranging art form that promotes individuality and allows dancers, choreographers to express themselves in wider ways than, say, classical ballet technique, which is very structured and formal.

As Kristy Kuhn speaks, the camera cuts between her speaking on screen and video of her dancing in a brightly lit dance studio.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Dancers dressed as scientists in lab coats and goggles rehearse in a dance studio.

KRISTY KUHN [off screen]: Each one of us has our own individual preference for movement and the kind of aesthetic that we find pleasing to the eye, as well as pleasing to the body.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
While Kristy is speaking, the video cuts to her, facing the camera.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Two dancers, one in a wolf's head mask the other in a crow's head mask, dance on a black stage.

KRISTY KUHN [off screen]: And I feel with modern dance being so broad, someone can go to a modern dance performance and it may not be something they're interested in or they may consider it weird or very unfamiliar. And they may dismiss the entire area of modern dance and say, I don't like it. I'm not going back.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
While Kristy Kuhn is speaking, the video cuts between the masked dancers, Kristy facing the camera, and other dancers wearing green shirts and brown pants dancing on a black stage.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Fade to black.

The video cuts to a scene of two female dancers rehearsing in a wooden-floored studio while Dr. Jody Weber looks on. One of the dancers is standing, the other is lying on the floor.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "BOSTON CENTER FOR THE ARTS, BOSTON, MA"

DANCER 1: I think we did this.

The first dancer starts to lie down on top of the dancer on the floor.

DR. JODY WEBER: You got your foot caught.
DANCER 1: Yeah.
DR. JODY WEBER: So maybe when you go down. Yeah.
DANCER 1: Usually, my feet aren't caught though. That was awkward.
DR. JODY WEBER: I wonder if like when you go down before you try to do it, if they're not uncovered, if you--
DANCER 1: Just try a little whoop?
DR. JODY WEBER: Yeah. Just open the skirt. Yeah.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: I think that's the art form has always been very individualistic in nature. That is to say that every choreographer's work is different and is reflective of that person, their history, their relationship to the world around them.

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: Then turn.
DANCER 1: OK.
DR. JODY WEBER: And then you've got that last.
DANCER 1: OK.
DANCER 2: You want to try that with the dress in between us?

[MUSIC PLAYING]
The camera cuts to another scene at the wooden-floored dance studio, where dancers rehearse.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: When I start a new work, I create a movement language that becomes that world, that will complete that work.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Dancers rehearse in the studio.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: And I think that people really fear not getting it, and feel very challenged in staying open to the experience.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Dancers rehearse in the studio.
The scene fades to black and white images of dancers performing on a black stage, as seen from a balcony above, and then straight ahead.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: When I work with young people in a choreography class, the very first hurdle that we have to get through together is that they want the dance to look pretty and they want it to make people feel good. So while there's nothing wrong with looking pretty or making people feel good, that is a really, really narrow definition of what one does with art. I mean, art is an exploration of human expression and thought in its vastness, one would hope. So getting out of that little narrow constraint and starting to think about all the possibilities that you have to work with is really frightening.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the video shows scenes of dancers performing on stage, the video in black and white.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: If you look at popular dance today, what does popular dance look like? It almost always accentuates sexuality. And there's a lot of unison dancing, precision dancing. In what I'm doing as a choreographer, none of those elements are there. So if someone has his expectations and comes to one of my shows, they're going to be disappointed. They're not going to know what they're looking at.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the video cuts a scene of a popular dance ensemble dancing suggestively, followed by a group of people dancing in unison on a sunlit boardwalk.
The video cuts back to dancers from the Weber Dance studio, rehearsing.
A dancer in a long brown dress practices in the studio, cut to her performing the dance on a black stage.

The camera cuts to an image of a dancer with her hands stretched above her head, and her left leg extended high.

JEN SYLVIA [off screen]: The thing about me and dance is I can't get away from it.

The video cuts to Jen Sylvia facing the camera.
On screen, words in white letters: "JEN SYLVIA, WEBER DANCE"

JEN SYLVIA [on screen]: A lot of people say like, I spend time worrying about how to bring it into my life. I've tried to get dance out of my life sometimes, and I never seem to be able to. I tried to do medicine and I was miserable for three years when I was trying to make dance a minimal part. And now I found out that it's not the way that it should be where it is something that my body and my soul need on almost a daily basis. Just welcome it and make it a huge part of your life, and it's been so much better since I've done that.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
While Jen Sylvia is speaking, the video cuts between her facing the camera and scenes of her dancing in the studio or on stage.

A scene of two female dancers performing on a black stage.

WOMAN'S RECORDED VOICE [off screen]: The era of the wild apple will soon be passed. It is a fruit that will probably become extinct in New England. I fear that she who walks over these fields a century hence will not know the pleasure of knocking off wild apples.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
The two dancers on the black stage continue to perform, joined by other dancers.

JEN SYLVIA [off screen]: I believe people have a hard time understanding modern dance because they don't let themselves go to that place of just seeing it as movement.

While Jen Sylvia is speaking, the video cuts to her facing the camera.
[MUSIC PLAYING]
The video cuts back to dancers performing on a black stage.

JEN SYLVIA [off screen]: It takes a while sometimes to unfold exactly what the choreographer was trying to say. So it just takes that patience, taking a step back, and seeing it.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Dancers wearing black perform on a black stage.

JEN SYLVIA [off screen]: But I also think that people hear the word modern dance and I don't know why we have this negative idea about us. But that's just the initial thing people say.

Video cuts to Jen Sylvia facing the camera.

JEN SYLVIA [on screen]: Like whenever I get asked, what kind of dancer are you? Oh, I'm a modern dancer. Oh, what are you, like, make your body look like figures? Like I'm a tree or I'm a rock. I'm like, yeah, exactly. That's what we do. It's just like a silly thing people think of. I don't know who started it, but they need to stop.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Jen Sylvia, wearing black rubber boots, orange rubber gloves, a black skirt, and a blue plaid shirt, crouches in some shrubbery, her right hand patting her chest above her heart. She looks around her.
The camera jumps back as she rises quickly, revealing that the shrubs she was crouching in are in front of a metal fence surrounding what may be a wooden dock by a body of water. The fence has a "NO TRESPASSING" sign.
Jen begins to dance in front of the fence.
She crouches again in the shrubs, patting her chest above her heart in time with the music.
She stands again and repeats the dance.
She rubs her gloved hands as if to brush off dirt.
She waves her left hand in front of her face, turning away from the camera as she does so.
She continues to dance, bending over and standing up, twirling, twerking, shaking her head.
She dances along the fence, grabbing it as she moves along.
She lies on the ground and pulls at the fence, miming climbing it.
She stands and continues to dance.
She crouches and sweeps the ground with her hand and passes her hand over her face.
She dances energetically and leans against the fence, pushing and pulling it.
She crawls backwards away from the fence, crab-like, and then back towards it.
She leans back into the fence while seated on the ground and grabs the fence with her right hand.
[MUSIC STOPS]

The video cuts to a blurry black and white still image of a dancer, possibly Jen Sylvia, her arms stretched above her.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: The spirit of rejection is the beginning of modern dance.

The video cuts to a black and white image of women marching in a city street during World War I.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: The art form developed during the 19th century women's movement when women were looking for health, they were looking for ways to move expressively something that had been denied to them. They were looking to get out of the corset. They were looking to be fully expressive human beings.

[MUSIC PLAYING] As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, more black and white images are shown of women from the early twentieth century, in dance poses and flowing garments.
Drawings of corsets from print media of the period are also shown.
A drawing of a man and a woman in fancy attire is shown.
Text beside the man reads: "SHALL we - a - Sit down?"
Text beside the woman reads: "I should like to; but my Dressmaker says I mustn't!"

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: Clothing for wealthy women was extremely restrictive. And in fact, the corset being probably the item of greatest focus was causing all kinds of health problems because they even corseted small girls. And so their organs could not develop properly. And so there was a health crisis along those fronts.

[MUSIC PLAYING] As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, more black and white images are shown of women from the early twentieth century, showing their corseted waists, and print advertisements for corsets.
An drawing of a corseted woman is seated while a maid puts shoes on the woman's feet.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: Women wore shoes that were also generally too small for their feet. Because small feet were something that was a desirable look.

[MUSIC PLAYING] As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, more black and white images are shown of women from the early twentieth century, focused on their feet and small shoes.
The video cuts to a black and white photo of suffragettes with small children marching in a city street. The women wear white dresses, hats, and sashes which read: "VOTES FOR WOMEN"

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: In terms of rights, women didn't have the right to vote, they couldn't own property, they weren't supposed to speak publicly. They were supposed to live what we would consider a pretty reserved, quiet existence.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, more black and white images are shown of women from the early twentieth century, one of a women being forcibly escorted by police, another a drawing of a woman with her hair in an updo.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: The Delsarte movement, which was a movement of gesture and some dance-like movement, stormed this country for women. And they performed for each other and their parlors. And it just was a huge, huge movement. And out of that, we really got the first pioneers of modern dance. They said, we want to go back to natural ways of moving. We're going to go barefoot. We're not going to dance in the corset. The idea of the natural female body as being beautiful, as being legitimate, as being expressive, it was a really powerful statement that women were making.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, many more black and white images are shown of women from the early twentieth century in dance poses, moving freely and energetically, barefoot, and in loosely draped or minimal clothing.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: You hear a lot of stories about women who are sort of going a little crazy or only staying in the bedroom with the shades pulled down. And I think when you're denied the kind of freedom and rights that we all want as human beings, things go wrong. And I think things were going wrong. And not just women, but society as a whole was starting to ask some questions about that for sure in the late 19th century.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, many more black and white images are shown of women from the early twentieth century, seen in medical settings with nurses, appearing ill.
The last image is of a woman in a tightly laced corset.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
The video cuts to the brightly lit dance studio where dancers are rehearsing in various dance costumes.

[CARS DRIVING BY ON A ROAD]
A scene of a city from a distance, with trees in the foreground.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Dancers rehearse in the wooden-floored dance studio.

JENNIFER ROBERTS [off screen]: Moving is a very honest way for me to interact with the world.

The video cuts to Jennifer Roberts facing the camera.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "JENNIFER ROBERTS, WEBER DANCE"

JENNIFER ROBERTS [on screen]: More honest, I think, or more true than anything else.

The video cuts to Jennifer Roberts rehearsing with other dancers in the wooden-floored studio.

JENNIFER ROBERTS [off screen]: Modern dance was very different from my early trainings. My early training was mostly at church. And praise dance is about being carried away. I could only use my arms, as a matter of fact. So I had I Love Jesus scarves that I would twirl. And that was the bulk of my dancing, I didn't move anything else. I had never raised my leg, really. And there was no torso movement. You could only do this or just Holy Ghost pop. Nothing, no hips, no torso. Holy Ghost pop. Holy Ghost pop. Jody saw me at an audition and asked if I wanted to do one small project with her. I think that was my audition, actually, the project because it's smarter really to figure out-- to see a dancer work in action and see how they interact with the other dancers, the company, or work ethic or that kind of thing. And then after, Jody asked me to join Weber Dance. And I said yes.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Jennifer Roberts is speaking, the video cuts between her facing the camera and her rehearsing with other dancers in the studio.

The video cuts to Jennifer Roberts standing on a dock in a green dress, patting her right hand on her chest above her heart.
A large boat is docked nearby, and mountains can be seen in the distance.
She jumps up and down in a circle while patting her chest.
[MUSIC PLAYING]
Jennifer intercuts her jumping with lunges and other dance moves before going back to jumping in a circle.
She jumps down onto the dock, lying down, and spins in a circle.
She stands slowly, her arms spread out.
She resumes jumping in a circle while patting her chest, and switching to lunges and dancing.
In one move, she mimes removing one of her shoes.
She springs back into energetic dancing.
She again springs onto the dock, lying down, and moves in a circle.
She rides, turns, and runs backwards away down the dock, away from the camera.

The camera cuts to an image of words in yellow letters on a black background: "THE EVOLUTION OF AESTHETIC AND EXPRESSIVE DANCE IN BOSTON"
The camera jumps back to reveal these words as the title to a book. There is a black and white image below the title of a smiling woman with long hair in a white bathing suit, holding a sheer curtain behind her and above her head. She is standing on a rock with a body of water behind her.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: I really want people to connect with the artwork. And I recognize that we're not getting the exposure or the education to do that in the way that would give you the fullest experience. But I'm not the first person. People have recognized this for a long, long time. And one of the most interesting women that I wrote about was a woman by the name of Miriam Winslow.

As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the camera cuts between images of text in books on dance education, and her, facing the camera.
The video shows an portrait in a book of Miriam Winslow.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Image cut to a still of Miriam Winslow with her arms outstretched, mid-dance.
As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the video cuts to more images of Miriam in dance costumes and poses.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: I felt a real kind of kinship with her. She really wanted to help people learn how to look at dance. She recognized that people didn't know how to look at structure or think about dance. And they couldn't really have a powerful experience because of that. She would go and do lecture demonstrations where she would talk about the elements. She would talk about how modern, for example, was different than ballet, what it embraced from ballet, how it diverged, what the language looked like. She really wanted to help our art form develop an audience. And I thought, had generations of choreographers included that approach, we would be sitting differently today.

[CITY AMBIENCE]
[INDISTINCT VOICES AND MUSIC]
A scene of a city street at night. A red awning is in the center, with words in white letters: "The Dance Complex"
Cut to an image of the bottom of a dark wood staircase, turning partway up to the left and then the right.
At the top of the stairs, a hallway.
A view looking up another turning set of stairs towards a set of double doors, open on a brightly lit room.

[HAND DRUMMING]
A man in a corner of a dance studio plays the drums. Dancers move about the space.
Dr. Jody Weber looks on.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: Dance wasn't just about the professional dancer. Dance was about the person who loves to move and loves to come to class. People who are never going to be professional dancers having great dance experiences. That's one of the reasons like I'm interested in having our community group. They're not professional dancers, but I think that the work that I do with them is also very important. Those people love dance. They love having an experience with dance. They are part of our larger community.

[HAND DRUMMING]
[MULTIPLE VOICES]
As Dr. Jody Waber speaks, scenes play of her teaching groups of dancers in studios.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: They're not less than the professional performer. I think of them as part of it. And embracing that diversity when you're working as an artist, I think also could change the way your own community relates to dance.

[MULTIPLE VOICES]
[APPLAUSE]
The group of dancers stops dancing and applauds.
The drummer hits the cymbal.
[CYMBAL CHIMES]

The video cuts to an outdoor dance stage scene at night. Dr. Jody Weber leans against a stone building, observing the scene.
[MUSIC PLAYING]
Dancers' shadows can be seen gracefully moving around on the building's stone wall behind Dr. Weber.
the camera pans to the left, revealing the dancers performing on stage in front of an audience. The dancers are in red shirts and black pants. They sit in and dance around a few red chairs.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: The reason that I wrote the book happened because when I got to Boston, I was involved in this survey project where we went out and surveyed what materials people had in their homes related to their work in dance companies that were no longer in existence. And what I was fascinated by was that everyone said, when I came to Boston in 19-- fill in the blank-- there was nothing happening. And then we started this X. And in fact, listening to lots of people talk that way, I realized there was a whole throughline of history. And nobody actually understood that there was a whole throughline of history. Everybody saw their moment as the moment. And part of that may have to do with the fact that most people don't work in this field for their whole lives just because of the physical issue. So now a lot of women retire in their 30s when they have children. And if you make it past that, a lot of people retire in their 50s because it's too hard on their body. What I wanted to do was go back and see if I could tell our story and see if I could help everyone understand we actually have a really rich history. And people have been thinking about how to develop connection to audiences and thinking about how to share their art across generations. And my hope in doing that was that it would give us a more integrated sense of the present moment, understanding what came before, understanding what their issues were, understanding what we have in common. So I feel that I'm an heir. I'm an heir to what they started here, and that their contributions were really powerful and important. And we're part of that timeline.

As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the video cuts between Dr. Weber facing the camera, black and white images and images in color of dancers from the twentieth century, scenes of modern dancers performing, and Dr. Weber speaking before an audience.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
A dancer in early twentieth century dress stands alone on a black stage. A sepia-tone photograph of a mill is projected on the back wall of the stage. The dancer moves her arms slowly in two circles, one clockwise, the other counter-clockwise, as if imitating the movement of machinery.
The scene fades in a swirling mist, into an image of mill workers weaving threads.

WOMAN'S RECORDED VOICE [off screen]: I weave and weave the livelong day. The woof is strong, the warp is good. I weave to be my mother's day. I weave to win my daily food. But ever as I weave, says she, the world of women haunteth me. So up and down before her loom, she paces on and to and fro till sunset fills the dusty room and makes the water redly glow. As if the Merrimack's calm flood were changed into a stream of blood.

As the woman's recording plays, images of early twentieth century mill working women fade in and out on screen, along with industrial-looking buildings.
The scene fades into a group of modern dancers slowly moving on a black stage.

[BELL RINGING]
The dancers put on aprons.
[SOUNDS OF LOOMS]
[MUSIC PLAYING]
Four of the aproned dancers begin dancing in unison, crouching on the floor of the stage. A fifth aproned dancer oversees them.
All five aproned dancers move together in circles.
[MECHANICAL TICKING]
[BELL RINGING]
[MUSIC PLAYING]
A dancer leaves the stage, and the four remaining aproned dancers perform, dancing in twirling circles for a few minutes until they come to a halt.
[MUSIC STOPS]

The video cuts to a an outdoor scene, in a sunlit field by a river. Snowcapped mountains are visible in the distance. Dr. Jody Weber is standing alone in a path in the field.
[SOPRANO VOICES SINGING]
The camera cuts to a scene of a brightly lit dance studio, where several dancers are rehearsing. Dr. Jody Weber is in the foreground, watching.

[SOPRANO VOICES SINGING]
The video cuts to some snowcapped mountains surrounded by a body of water.
The video cuts to a close-up shot of someone using a jump rope.
The camera jumps back and reveals it is Kristy Kuhn jumping rope on the shore by a waterfall.
The video cuts to a large glacier against a mountain, surrounded by icy water.
The video cuts back to Kristy jumping rope, facing the camera.

[SOPRANO VOICES SINGING]
The camera proceeds to cut between several scenes for a few moments at a time.
In the dance studio, two dancers stand, heads tilted back and looking at the ceiling.
In a city, Jennifer Roberts stands on a bridge in the foreground, her right hand out in front of her, near her chest.
An ice berg floats in icy waters near some snow-capped mountains.
A group of people wearing backpacks, facing away from the camera, look up at snowcapped mountains.
Two dancers in light blue shiny costumes dance together on a black stage.
A mountain surrounded by an icy sea in bright sunshine.
Four female dancers rehearse together in a dance studio.
A snowcapped mountain range surrounded by an icy sea.
A group of six people walk along an icy show by a body of water.
Dr. Jody Weber rehearses with other dancers in the studio.
The group of six people stand together on the icy shore.

[INAUDIBLE VOICES]
A black sign is pinned to a dance studio wall with words in white letters: "Juneau dance UNLIMITED"
Black and white photos of young dancers are also pinned to the wall on either side of the sign.
Dr. Jody Weber stretches with other dancers in the halls of this dance studio.
The camera cuts to another pinned wall sign which reads: "Juneau dance UNLIMITED PRESENTS AND EVENING OF DANCE WITH BOSTON DANCE COMPANY, WEBER DANCE, FEATURING STUDENT PERFORMERS FROM JUNEAU DANCE THEATRE, Friday June 19th, 7:00 PM, Thunder Mountain High School Auditorium. Tickets available at: Hearthside Books at the JACC and online"

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: You won't be able to put on 5, 6, 7, 8...
DR. JODY WEBER [on screen, directing dancers in a studio]: But essentially, four-ish going side the rest of that phrase.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: We've been coming to Juneau now for six years. And I have to say that it's one of my favorite places or favorite projects that we do. And one of the reasons is that we're here for three weeks and we have started to make some really wonderful connections with the community. And that really means a tremendous amount to me as a choreographer.

As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the camera cuts between the dancers rehearsing in the studio and her outdoors, wearing a red backpack, and facing the camera.
Camera cuts to Dr. Jody Weber instructing dancers in a studio.

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: But you have to keep a super straight line at the end. So make sure you stay right behind. Yeah.

BECCA ROZELL [off screen]: Some of these girls have been here since the first year we've started.

Camera cuts to Becca Rozell, facing the camera, wearing sunglasses and standing outside near a body of water in the mountains.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "BECCA ROZELL, GUEST INSTRUCTOR & FORMER COMPANY MEMBER"

BECCA ROZELL [on screen]: And I would guess that their growth as a dancer has probably been really excelled by these summer intensive workshops.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
A large company of young dancers rehearses together on a black stage.

ERIN GOTTWALD [off screen]: I think it's so easy to do something like this one time.

Camera cuts to Erin Gottwald, facing the camera and standing outside near a body of water in the mountains.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "ERIN GOTTWALD, GUEST INSTRUCTOR & FORMER COMPANY MEMBER"

ERIN GOTTWALD [on screen]: And there are so few companies or choreographers that consistently return to a community when they're doing a program like this. So the fact that she's done it for six consecutive years I think is a big testament to Jody's commitment to a community.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Dancers rehearse in a studio.
Camera cuts to a black sign with words in red letters: "Weber Dance Residency 2008 With Juneau Dance Unlimited"

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: I do remember the very first year that I went there. I gave a number of talks in the community. And what I think is interesting is that the kind of questions and response we get from that final performance now has shifted. The kinds of things people say are more informed and they're able to see more just because of that process. I think that shows evidence that having education be part of the process really does serve the art form in the long run.

As Dr. Jody Weber speaks, the camera cuts between images of her with young dancers, newspaper clippings about Weber Dance, Dr. Weber coaching groups of dancers in a studio, and dancers in red dresses performing on a stage.

[CITY AMBIENCE]
A city skyline on a sunny day, with greenery in the foreground and a body of water in between.
The camera cuts to a scene under the Boston Tobin Bridge, where someone can be seen using a jump rope in the distance.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: In order to do the art form that I want to practice, I have to live in a big city where there are dancers, where there are dance spaces, where there are dance jobs. And I've become accustomed to urban living and I love a lot of things about it. But I grew up in the country. And although I don't want to live in the country, that's where I find inspiration. And as an adult, that's really come back to me that the most inspirational places for me to make work have been in the country. This is I think intimately tied to this question of our relationship to the world around. Those of us who live in urban environments are in our hearts and souls missing that connection to wildness and the planet and its natural state. Something about the way we're living and have developed our communities is off. Might there be some way to develop an urban community that offers us the jobs and the diversity and still offers a connection to nature? I suspect there is. We just have never thought that way. The Industrial Revolution sent us in a different direction.

As Dr. Jody Weber is speaking, the camera cuts between scenes of a city and scenes of nature.
A view of the Boston harbor.
A woodland forest filled with ferns and tall trees, where a woman walks along a path.
A small group of people standing on the shore of a body of water in the mountains.
[WAVES WASHING UP ON SHORE]
A close shot of hands on a laptop keyboard.
The camera jumps back to show a woman sitting in a red chair, on the shore of a body of water in the mountains, typing on a laptop in her lap.
A person para gliding in the mountains.

[A CAR DRIVES BY ON A ROAD]
A person in a blue sweatshirt lies on the grass beside a road in the mountains while a car drives by.
[MUSIC PLAYING]
The person quickly springs into dancing on the ground.
Cars continue to drive by.
The dancer frantically rolls about on the ground as she dances.
The dancer's movements start to slow down.
The dancer stands and begins to move frantically again before diving back towards the ground to roll and move.
The dancer stands, jumping and waving her arms.
She pauses the dance in a long stretch, her arms up and spread back, her face towards the sun.
The dancer begins to move quickly again, twirling, and diving back on the ground before springing back up.
She halts, and slowly moves her hands around her body.

ADRIANE BRAYTON [off screen]: I did a lot of different art forms as a kid, performance art.

The video cuts to Adriane Brayton, facing the camera.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "ADRIANE BRAYTON, WEBER DANCE"

ADRIANE BRAYTON [on screen]: I used to sing and act and do all that kind of stuff. And I think dance sounds really lame, but it was always like the easiest thing.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Camera cuts to Adriane and another dancer performing on a black stage.

ADRIANE BRAYTON [off screen]: I had a conversation with my father. He was a piano player, and so he was talking to me about playing Bach and having two melodies going on in different hands. And once you get really good at that, he was saying that it's like meditating because he was actually trying to encourage me to play piano. And I was like, well, I'm not having that experience with piano, but I do have that experience with dance. And I think it's really appealing to just be free in that way, to just experience it on a very visceral level.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Adriane Brayton speaks, the camera cuts between scenes of her dancing with the other dancers, and her, facing the camera.

[WATER RUSHING]
Three people walk along the shore of a body of water in the mountains on a sunny day.

ADRIANE BRAYTON [on screen]: Jody's work is really interesting to perform because she has a really great emotional and spiritual quality that she instills in her dances. And a lot of them are about the connection between humans and the environment and how complicated and interesting that has become.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Adriane and Kristy rehearsing in a brightly lit studio.

ADRIANE BRAYTON [off screen]: As a dancer, I've been able to, you know, find the magic and the excitement that is in dance for me and then connect that with her feelings about nature and spirituality and the world not just being about money and getting ahead and living your life in a city, but about connecting to the Earth. And doing it in Alaska is amazing because it's such a beautiful and natural landscape, as you can see.

As Adriane speaks, the scene cuts from her and Kristy dancing to Adriane speaking on screen, standing on the shore of a body of water in the mountains, in Alaska.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
A woman in a green windbreaker and white sunglasses sits on a boat in the foreground, the boat moving quickly through a body of water among snowcapped mountains.
Adriane walks along a mountain path, smiling, and looking down and out at a large body of water between the mountains.

ADRIANE BRAYTON [on screen]: And so I feel like the connection between her work and connecting to the environment is really important to do here because it's just a really beautiful place and it is easier for me to connect here than being in Boston performing in a big theater.

As Adriane speaks, the scene cuts from her and Kristy dancing to Adriane speaking on screen, standing on the shore of a body of water in the mountains, in Alaska.

The scene cuts to a brightly lit dance studio, where Dr. Jody Weber teaches a class of young dancers.

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: You're coming on the floor here, this way.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: In that way, Juneau's an amazing opportunity to actually go and do what I love to do in a place that also has spectacular natural beauty and allows me to feel connected.

As Dr. Weber is speaking, the camera cuts between her in the dance studio to her dancers walking in the mountains, and back to the studio.

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: And pull up. Look at each other! Right. You don't want to past each other.

The camera cuts to a drawing of a white passenger van.
Text above the image reads: "ARTIST'S CONCEPTION OF WEBER DANCE CLEAN ENERGY VAN"

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: That's why the van, the clean energy van, to be so cool. That would be a way for me to live my own truth.

Cut to Dr. Weber on screen.

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: My idea was to create a van that runs on clean energy and could transport a portable dance floor, which already exists, and could also charge lighting instruments that would also be running on clean energy. That technology already exists as well. And one of the challenges for dance is that there aren't that many theaters of a size that are appropriate for us around this country. And many small communities don't have a theater at all. So a van would combine everything about working in a really integrated way with the environment and not taxing the environment and allow us to bring dance to communities that might not otherwise have it. And bring educational experiences to dance communities that might not have it.

As Dr. Weber is speaking, the camera cuts between her facing the camera;
the dance studio, where text, "PORTABLE DANCE FLOOR," appears on screen and points at the black dance floor;
to the outdoor stage scene, where text, "CAN RUN ON BATTERIES," appears on screen and points at the portable stage lights;
to a black dance stage where dancers stand under stage lights;
to an illustration of Dr. Weber's clean energy van design, in red with a yellow "W" on the side;
to Dr. Weber in the studio rehearsing with dancers.

DR. JODY WEBER [on screen]: So you have three shapes. I'll just give it to you. lunge, second, change, change, change. Second lunge. Change, change, change.

SHANNON HUMPHREYS [off screen]: Jody is not interested in sort of flying into a situation, teaching some classes, doing a show, and flying right back out again.

Camera cuts to Shannon Humphreys speaking outdoors, facing the camera.

SHANNON HUMPHREYS [on screen]: She wants to be a part of the community, and we've really sort of had-- we have a relationship with the people here after six years.

A black dance stage, where young dancers rehearse with Kristy Kuhn.

KRISTY KUHN [on screen]: And to get you on quarter, just so we have-- I know we moved you in, and Roxy is on quarter too.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: I think that art is and should be an interactive and warm and friendly and communicative experience.

KRISTY KUHN [on screen]: And wave and final pose. Ta-da. Yeah. And that's it, Julia.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: So we do do a performance that is a culmination of our time here. And I do enjoy that and it is part of what we're doing. But by the time we get to that, we have established relationships, we've talked about the pieces. And I hope that it's more than this is my thing, you should watch it. That it's much more of a sharing of ideas and work that could continue in conversation after the performance, which often happens here.

As Dr. Weber speaks, the camera cuts from Kristy Kuhn coaching young dancers, to scenes of the dancers' performances, to Dr. Weber in Alaska on shore by the water, facing the camera, to Dr. Weber rehearsing with young dancers in the studio.

Kristy Kuhn and Shannon Humphreys dance on the black stage, Kristy dressed in black, Shannon dressed as an early twentieth century mill worker.

WOMAN'S RECORDED VOICE [off screen]: I will tell you why the factory girl sits at the hour of meditation and thinks not of the crowded clattering mill, nor the noisy tenement, which is her home, but of the evening and the bird that has pillowed its head beneath its wing, of the myriad of stars and the void of space beyond, where could I be alone?

KRISTY KUHN [off screen]: All the pieces that I've been lucky to be a part of with Jody, I always learn something rich about history and about nature and a wide variety of other topics. But this one, in particular, brings me back to the idea of connection, and particularly connection with nature.

Camera cuts to Kristy on screen, facing the camera.

KRISTY KUHN [on screen]: Because even through our travels to Juneau, being outside into this untapped area and taking hikes in the natural environment, it brings upon the sense of ease and calm that's indescribable. And then when we come back to Boston, in the midst of the city, and all the noise, and being bombarded with all the visual stimulation, I'm much more aware of how my body kind of reacts to that. And her piece is often about what is lost and what is gained as a result of the advancement in the Industrial Revolution and such. So I am even experiencing that today. If I take a lot of time away from nature and away from the quiet, how easy it is to get caught up into the hustle and bustle and kind of forget the connection with even myself and the quiet within.

As Kristy Kuhn is speaking, the video cuts between her facing the camera; scenes of the dancers hiking in the Alaskan mountains; a bird's eye shots of Boston's highway system; Shannon Humphreys dancing as a mill worker on a black stage.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Camera cuts to Jennifer Roberts, standing outside by the water in Alaska.

JENNIFER ROBERTS [on screen]: To some extent, we all are disconnected because we're coming into, at least me, in a very urban area. And as an adult, I am seeing more. And like I said, the attempt to be responsible, the attempt to be appreciative, the attempt to like look around and not with my eyes half closed, but to open them as much as possible and take in all of this.

Camera cuts to a melting glacier.

JENNIFER ROBERTS [off screen]: And to protect what we have. Like this earth, It's all we have.

[WATER FLOWING]
Image of glacier fades to black.

[WATER FLOWING]
[SEA BIRDS CAWING]
A scene of a sandy shore by a body of water in the mountains.
[MUSIC PLAYING]
A dancer, half-lying, half-crouching on the sand, begins to move.
She rolls around, spinning, standing, crouching, lying down, stretching.
She slowly stands in a lunge, her arms spread out from her sides, as the sun shines upon her.
The dancer continues to roll and kick in the sand, moving in long, slow stretches.
She lies in the sand.

[CITY AMBIENCE]
The scene fades to a city skyline at night, from the beginning of the film. A subway train moves across a bridge.
A city street at night, the viewer is looking from one side of a busy street to the other at a crosswalk.
Cut to posters advertising dance shows pinned to a wall.

[INDISTINCT VOICES]
Dr. Jody Weber and her dancers stand together in a hall, milling around and stretching.
Some of the dancers are chatting in the background
[...It was so stupid...]
[INDISTINCT VOICES]

Scene cuts to the black dance stage, dark, with one small light on in the corner.
A woman moves a push broom around the stage.

DR. JODY WEBER [off screen]: It feels very small to me. Like, it feels like my contribution is so, so small in the big picture. But I guess we all have to make our contribution as we can. And maybe some of those people in their living rooms taking off the corset and putting on a Greek toga felt that that was really small too. But it in its own way made a wave because there were lots of people doing that. And maybe there are lots of other artists and other mediums in small ways trying to do what I'm trying to do. And maybe there is a wave that could build through that. Only time will tell.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
As Dr. Weber speaks, video plays of Kristy Kuhn and Shannon Humphreys dressed as turn-of-the-twentieth-century women, changing into mill work aprons, then into modern dance outfits.
They are joined on stage by Jennifer Roberts, Dr. Weber, Adriane Brayton, and Jen Sylvia.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
The scene cuts to Dr. Weber coaching the dancers in rehearsal in a brightly lit studio.
The camera quickly cuts several times back and forth between them in the studio and dancing on the black stage.

[TRAIN WHISTLE]
The scene of the dancers on stage fades to black.
[APPLAUSE]

[CHEERS]
Lights fade back on to the five dancers, taking bows for the audience.
Dr. Jody Weber enters from stage left, to much cheering. She bows.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
The scene cuts to Shannon Humphreys dressed all in red, standing on the shore by a waterfall.
Other dancers enter the shot.
Jennifer Roberts hurries to bring Shannon a coat.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "SHANNON CONTINUES HER WORK WITH WEBER DANCE AND OTHER OUTSIDE PROJECTS"

[MUSIC PLAYING]
The scene cuts to Jen Sylvia crouching in the shrubbery by the metal fence.
The video cuts to the other dancers in the studio, and then on the stage.
The camera cuts to a Jen Sylvia doing a handstand on the sandy shore by the water.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "JEN DANCES IN NEW YORK CITY"

[MUSIC PLAYING]
The video cuts to Jennifer Roberts in a green dress dancing on the dock by a boat.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "JENNIFER ALSO CONTINUES HER WORK WITH WEBER DANCE AND OTHER COMPANIES"

[MUSIC PLAYING]
The video cuts to Adriane Brayton in a blue sweatshirt, standing in the grass by a busy road in the mountains.
On screen words in white letters appear: "ADRIANE IS FOCUSING ON HER OWN CHOREOGRAPHY"

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Adriane, Jennifer, Shannon, and Dr. Weber stand together in a parking lot by the road where Adriane had her dance scene.

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Kristy dances in the sand on the shore by the water.
On screen, words in white letters appear: "KRISTY STILL DANCES WITH WEBER DANCE AND IS PURSUING HER PHD IN EDUCATIONAL STUDIES"

[MUSIC PLAYING]
Jennifer, Adriane, Jen, Kristy, and Dr. Weber laugh together at the sandy shore.
The camera fades to an illustration of the clean energy van's design.
On screen below the van in white letters appear the words: "JODY'S VAN PROJECT IS ON ITS WAY TO BECOMING A REALITY"

[MUSIC PLAYING]
The camera cuts out to a poster detailing the design of the upcoming van project.
The camera fades in to focus on the top of the poser, which reads: "Dance Core Project, Dr. Jody Weber, BSU Department of Dance"
The camera focuses on different sections of the poster describing the project.
Camera cuts to black.

[INDISTINCT VOICES AND MUSIC]
The video shows the dancers in the studio, talking and stretching.
On screen, the following words in white letters appear:

FINDING HEAVEN UNDER OUR FEET, MAKING MODERN DANCE, Photographed, Edited and Produced by Chris Engles

DR. JODY WEBER, Artistic Director
DANCERS: Adriane Brayton, Shannon Humphreys, Kristy Kuhn, Jennifer Roberts, Jen Sylvia, with Erin Gottwald, Rebecca Lay, and Becca Rozell

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS, Kristi Stephens Adams, Ken Bader, Lois Blood Bennett, Mary Bennett, William Bennett, Joy Bogard, Eileen Bolinsky, Bonnie Borthwick, Clark Boyd, Paula Brody, Jessica Brown, Jerry Bussiere, Sal Catalano, John Coyne, Barry Clegg, Benjamin Eckstein, John Emery, Dennis Foley, Judith Glaven, Lisa Lunskaya Gordon, David Greene, Dave and Kerri Tester, Anthony Hanson, Joan Hathaway, Thom Heckel, Christine Herot, Ann Hochschild, Shannon Humphreys, Margaret Keefe, Brian Kingsbury, Karen Kingsbury, Cindy Larson, Marta Lehman, Pauline Lim, MaryPat Lohse, Peter John Marquez, Brett Maxwell, Mika Nakamura, Liz Norton, Alan Perkins, David Raskin, Dan Reiner, Glenn Rifkin, Cindy Rosner, J.L. Rutledge, Doug Shugarts, Matt Willis

ASSOCIATE PRODUCTERS, Shannon Humphreys & Jody Weber
Additional Camera Work by John Coyne and Bill Parsons
Stage Lighting by Jayne Murphy
Illustrations by Rori!

IMAGES

Planet Earth courtesy of NASA

Showing the litter problem on the coast of Guyana By Nils Ally - Personal trip in 2010, CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4730037

DARK CLOUDS OF FACTORY SMOKE OBSCURE CLARK AVENUE BRIDGE - NARA - 550179 By Frank J. (Frank John) Aleksandrowicz, 1921-, Photographer (NARA record: 8452210) - U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17100801

Sea Ice Retreat in the Beaufort Sea - NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen
Planet Earth courtesy of NASA

time lapse flower bloom video courtesy of ChokchaiSiri

Adrienne Pagnette, 14 or 15 year old mill worker, Glenallen Mill, Winchendon, Massachusetts, 1911, by Lewis Hines, Public Domain

Dance Team and Zumba footage via Pond5

Isadora Duncan By Arnold Genthe (1869-1942) - Library of Congress, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/image:Isadora_duncan.jpg, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=443628

Suffragists "march in October 1917, displaying placards containing the signatures of over one million New York women demanding to vote.", Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2948583

Isadora_Duncan_1903 By Raymond Duncan - Online Archive of California, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8985310

Ruth St. Denis CALL NUMBER: LC-B2 1160-11[P&P] REPRODUCTION NUMBER: LC-DIG-ggbain-05890 (digital file from original neg.) By Bain News Service - This image is available from the United States Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division under the digital ID ggbain.05890., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=2650281

1898Das_Album6 By Dupont - Das Album, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4446487

From Veto Magazine, by George du Maurier (6 March 1834-8 October 1896) - Scanned by H. Churchyard, Public Domain, https://en.wikipedia.org/index.php?curid=3926129

Gibson Girl trying on shoes, public domain

Reformkleidung ausFigaro illustre 1891 Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=981945

Feminist_Suffrage_Parade_in_New_York_City,_1912, This image is available from the United States Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division under the digital ID cph.3g05585., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=851583

London - arrest of a suffragette (LOC) This image is available from the United States Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division under the digital ID ggbain.10397., Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=11157518

Gibson Girl portrait, Public Domain

Dancing Gilrs courtesy of the Park School Belmont MA

Jerome Robbins Dance Division, The New York Public Library. (1917). Denishawn group at Tent Theatre, first dance theatre in America. Retrieved from http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47df-8766-a3d9-e040-e00a180...

Francesca Braggiotti article courtesy of the Isabella Gardner Museum

Braggiotti Sisters image curtsey The Peterborough Historical Society

Dalcroze-Schule (Group Dance), photo by Frédéric Boissonnas, ca. 1915 Public Domain, Dalcroze-Schule (Four Dancers in Flight), photo by Frédéric Boissonnas, ca. 1913 Public Domain

Mary Wigman i Monte Verità, tidigt 1900-tal Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0

From the book Iconographie Photographique De La Salpêtrière (1877-1880), sourced from Wikipedia Commons and The Waring Historical Library online exhibit Dr. John-Marin Charcot and the Theater of Medicine.

Edwardian corset By Unknown - Antique photograph, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=7108183

"Images of Miriam Winslow courtesy the Harvard Theatre Collection Houghton Library, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA"

Photograph of Ruth St. Denis in The Book of Dance By Arnold Genthe - Internet Archive, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=37261959

Braggiotti Sisters, Library of Congress

MUSIC

Sonic Scape, The Roll, Magic Van, Guitar Aquarius by The Loading Doctors, William Bennett - Guitar, Steve Taylor - Bass, Tracy Kroll - Drums/Percussion

Original Score for Film by Jason Jordan

Choral performances by Vox Equalis, Ruth Barry, Kristina Frances, Pauline Lim, Cory MacLean

Music for solo dances composed, performed and recorded by Ryan Edwards, www.ryanedwards.info

The Easiest Thing by Chris Engles

Drum performance by Jerry Bussiere

'The Wheelbarrow Piece', form Five (and-a-half) Gardens, by Dan Trueman, performed by So Percussion manyarrowsmusic.com

Illuminations, from the album Time-Lapse Volume 2: meditations, by Lee Rosevere - licensed under CC BY-NC 3.0

The Rolling Hills of England, from the album Psycho, by Plusplus - licensed under CC BY-NC ND 4.0

Cylinder Six, by Chris Zabriskie from the ablum Cylinders - licensed under CC BY 4.0

Cylinder Five, by Chris Zabriskie from the ablum Cylinders - licensed under CC BY 4.0

Masterplan, from the album Don't Believe was produced by Carlos Slinger (DJ Soul Slinger) and Keef D' estefano (dj WALLY). Please check the full wordings at album cover or Discogs site.

A Walk by Tycho - ghostly.com

goldberg-variations-bww-988, Public Domain

SPECIAL THANKS

The Dance Complex; Mary McCarthy; John Coyne; Darren Herlihy; Rick Scheiber; Liz Norton; Juneau Dance Theatre; their students and their families; Rick Pruett & KATH-TV Juneau, Alaska; Broad Institute; our Kickstarter supporters; the Weber Dance Community Group; Mark Steele; the HarvardX crew

Copyright 2016, JAN 70 / ONE TAKE MEDIA

Screen fades to a whiteout.
Image fades into a shot of the sandy beach by the water in Alaska. A man crouches in the sand. A woman closer to the water raises her hand in greeting to the man.
On screen, words in white letters read: "JAN 70 / ONE TAKE MEDIA"
Another person joins the woman near the shore. The man stands.

Fade to black.