UNICEF

2013
UN survey of 10,000 men in Asia and the Pacific reveals why some men use violence against women and girls. United Nations Development Programme [Internet]. 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/presscenter/pressreleases/2013/...

A UN study of 10,000 men in Asia and the Pacific, released today, found that overall nearly half of those men interviewed reported using physical and/or sexual violence against a female partner, ranging from 26 percent to 80 percent across the sites studied.  Nearly a quarter of men interviewed reported perpetrating rape against a woman or girl, ranging from 10 percent to 62 percent across the sites.  

Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: A statistical overview and exploration of the dynamics of change. UNICEF; 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unicef.org/publications/index_69875.html

A new report from UNICEF analyses prevalence and trends in female genital mutilation/cutting in 29 countries. Drawing on data from more than 70 nationally representative surveys over a 20-year period, the report finds that the practice has declined in a number of countries. Other important changes are under way.

2011
Regional Overview for the Middle East and North Africa, MENA Gender Equality Profile. UNICEF; 2011. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unicef.org/gender/gender_62215.html

To view this report, please click the document "Regional Overview for the Middle East and North Africa."

In 2011 the Middle East and North African Regional Office (MENARO) developed Gender Equality Profiles for all the countries in the MENA Region. The objective of the MENA gender equality profiles is to provide user-friendly, summary information on the status and situation of girls and women for all countries in the Middle East and North Africa Region.

2010
Children in Indonesia: Child Trafficking. UNICEF; 2010. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unicef.org/indonesia/media_11823.html

A ‘child victim of trafficking’ is any person under the age of 18 who is recruited, transported, transferred, harboured or received for the purpose of exploitation, either within or outside a country. Child trafficking affects children throughout the world, in both industrialized and developing countries. Trafficked children are often subjected to prostitution, forced into marriage or illegally adopted; they provide cheap or unpaid labour, work as house servants or beggars, are recruited into armed groups and are used for sports. Trafficking exposes children to violence, sexual abuse and HIV infection and violates their rights to be protected, grow up in a family environment and have access to education. 

2009
Freeman M. Reservations to CEDAW: An analysis for UNICEF. UNICEF; 2009. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unicef.org/search/search.php?q_en=reservations+to+CEDAW+marsh...

This study is undertaken to provide UNICEF with recommendations for supporting the withdrawal of reservations to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). While the problem of reservations is well documented as a legal issue, the practical effect of reservations on the primary stakeholders—women, girls, families, and communities—and the practical issues surrounding withdrawal of reservations have received much less attention. 

This paper provides an overview of the legal and practical implications of reservations; an examination of the different domestic legal systems in which reservations are entered; a “mapping” of the current reservations to CEDAW; and an exploration of the domestic legal and political contexts in which some of the most critical reservations have been withdrawn. 

2006
Yemen: Monitoring the situation of children and women: Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2006. UNICEF; 2006. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://mics.unicef.org/survey_archives/yemen/survey0/index.html

The Yemen Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) was carried by the Ministry of Health. Financial and technical support was provided by the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and The Pan Arab Project for Family Health (PAPFAM), League of Arab States.

The survey has been conducted as part of the third round of MICS surveys (MICS3), carried out around the world in more than 50 countries, in 2005-2007, following the first two rounds of MICS surveys that were conducted in 1995 and the year 2000. Survey tools are based on the models and standards developed by the global MICS project, designed to collect information on the situation of children and women in countries around the world. Additional information on the global MICS project may be obtained from www.childinfo.org.