WHO

2016
Narasimhan M, Orza L, Welbourn A, Bewley S, Crone T, Vazquez M. Sexual and reproductive health and human rights of women living with HIV: a global community survey. Bulletin of the World Health Organization [Internet]. 2016;(94) :243-249. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.wunrn.com/2016/05/hivaids-sexual-reproductive-rights-of-women-living-with-hiv-a-global-community-survey/?_sf_s=HIV+gl

In the development of any of its global guidelines, the World Health Organization (WHO) places importance on the values and preferences of the population or individuals that could be affected by the recommendations made within the guidelines. WHO has guidelines on the care, treatment and support for women living with HIV and their children in resource-con-strained settings, but these guidelines were published in 2006 and require updating. As an initial step in the updating process, WHO commissioned a global survey to listen to the voices of women living with HIV and determine these women’s sexual and reproductive health priorities. The main aim of the survey was to ensure that the values and preferences of women living with HIV would inform the guidelines from the very start of its development. The methods and key outcomes of the global survey are described and discussed below.

2013
Global and Regional Estimates of Violence against Women: Prevalence and Health Effects of Intimate Partner Violence and Non-Partner Sexual Violence. World Health Organization, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, South African Medical Research Council; 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/978924156462...

The report presents the first global systematic review of scientific data on the prevalence of two forms of violence against women: violence by an intimate partner (intimate partner violence) and sexual violence by someone other than a partner (non-partner sexual violence). It shows, for the first time, global and regional estimates of the prevalence of these two forms of violence, using data from around the world. Previous reporting on violence against women has not differentiated between partner and non-partner violence.

2012
Understanding and Addressing Violence Against Women Overview. World Health Organization; 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/rhr12_35/en/

WHO and PAHO have developed a series of information sheets on violence against women that summarizes what is known about the prevalence, patterns, consequences, risk factors and strategies to address the different forms of VAW. This series is for programme managers, practitioners, researchers, policy-makers and others working in a wide range of sectors and in every country.

Understanding and addressing violence against women: Intimate partner violence. WHO; 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/topics/violence/vaw_series/en/

Intimate partner violence is one of the most common forms of violence against women and includes physical, sexual, and emotional abuse and controlling behaviours by an intimate partner. Intimate partner violence (IPV) occurs in all settings and among all socioeconomic, religious and cultural groups. The overwhelming global burden of IPV is borne by women. Although women can be violent in relationships with men, often in self-defense, and violence sometimes occurs in same-sex partnerships, the most common perpetrators of violence against women are male intimate partners or ex-partners. By contrast, men are far more likely to experience violent acts by strangers or acquaintances than by someone close to them. 

WHO Intimate Partner Violence Overview. WHO [Internet]. 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/rhr12_36/en/

WHO and PAHO have developed a series of information sheets on violence against women that summarizes what is known about the prevalence, patterns, consequences, risk factors and strategies to address the different forms of VAW. This series is for programme managers, practitioners, researchers, policy-makers and others working in a wide range of sectors and in every country.

2011
Garcia-Moreno C, Watts C. Violence against women: an urgent public health priority. World Health Organization [Internet]. 2011. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/89/1/10-085217/en/

Addressing violence against women is central to the achievement of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 3 on women's empowerment and gender equality, as well as MDGs 4, 5 and 6. It is also a peace and security issue. In spite of this recognition, investment in prevention and in services for survivors remains woefully inadequate.

2005
Addressing Violence against Women and Achieving the Millennium Development Goals. Geneva: World Health Organization (WHO) Department of Gender, Women and Health; 2005. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/gender-equity-rights/knowledge/who_fch_gwh_05_1/en/

Violence against women hinders progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). This document highlights the connections between the MDGs and the prevention of violence against women by showing how: a) working towards the MDGs will reduce violence against women; and b) preventing violence against women will contribute to achieving the MDGs. It provides recommendations to address violence against women and promote progress towards the 8 MDGs.

Researching Violence Against Women: A Practical Guide for Researchers and Activists. World Health Organization and Program for Appropriate Technology in Health; 2005. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/9241546476/en/

Produced by PATH and the World Health Organization, this guide draws on the experience of researchers from more than 40 countries and presents methods for performing surveys and qualitative research on gender-based violence in low-resource settings. It covers all aspects of the research process, from study design to training field workers. It also describes ways to use findings to influence decision-makers. Most important, it presents clear guidelines for protecting the safety of women participating in the research.

Each chapter can be viewed or downloaded separately under the section "INDIVIDUAL CHAPTERS".

WHO Multi-country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence against Women. World Health Organization; 2005. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/24159358X/en/

Emphasis on Chapter 9: Women's coping strategies and responses to physical violence by intimate partners

WHO’s landmark study documents violence against women by their intimate partners. This report presents the initial results based on evidence collected from over 24,000 women in 10 countries. The report culminates in 15 recommendations to strengthen national commitment and action on violence against women by promoting primary prevention, harnessing education systems, strengthening the health sector’s response, supporting women living with violence, sensitizing criminal justice systems, undertaking research and enhancing collaboration.

2002
Krug EG, Dahlberg LL, Mercy JA, Zwi AB, Lozano R ed. World Report on Violence and Health. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/world_report/en/

The World Health Organization launched the first World report on violence and health on October 3rd, 2002. Since then, more than 30 governments have organized national launches or policy discussions about the Report, and resolutions endorsing the Report and calling for its implementation have been passed in a number of fora, such as the World Health Assembly, the United Nations High Commission on Human Rights, and the African Union.

The World report on violence and health is the first comprehensive review of the problem of violence on a global scale – what it is, whom it affects and what can be done about it. Three years in the making, the report benefited from the participation of over 160 experts from around the world, receiving both peer-review from scientists and contributions and comments from representatives of all the world’s regions.

2000
Shrader E, Sagot M. Domestic Violence: Women's Way Out. Pan American Health Organization; 2000. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www1.paho.org/english/hdp/hdw/womenswayout.htm

The Regional Program on Women, Health, and Development (HDW) of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), with support from Norway and Sweden coordinated the development of the research protocol Domestic Violence: Women's Way Out, in the framework of the HDW Program's subregional project Strengthening and Organization of Women and Coordinated Action between the State and Civil Society at the Local Level to Prevent and Address Family Violence.