International

2013
Swajaya N. ASEAN Day Panel Discussion - Presentation of Amb. I Gede Ngurah Swajaya, in Panel Discussion on the ASEAN Community Building. Jakarta, Indonesia ; 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://aichr.org/documents/

Very last document

Promoting and protection of human rights cooperation in ASEAN is an evolving process. It was started by the endorsement of the Joint Communique of the 26th ASEAN Foreign Ministers’ Meeting in 1993 in which ASEAN pledged, for the first time, its commitment to respect and promote human rights and fundamental freedom. The United Nations World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna, Austria acknowledged and welcome this commitment. Since then, the process of establishing an ASEAN Mechanism to promote and protect human rights has been started.

Hanoi Plan of Action, as the first Plan of Action to implement the ASEAN Vision 20202 reemphasized ASEAN's commitment to exchange information among its members on the promotion and protection of Human Rights as elaborated in section IV, paragraph 4.8.3 As the second phase of the Plan of Action to implement the ASEAN Vision 2020, the 2004 Vientiane Action Program, under the sub-section Political Development, ASEAN reaffirmed its commitment to promote human rights and fundamental freedom. ASEAN Charter that was entered into force at the end of 2008 gave a significant leapfrog to

the ASEAN’s efforts to establish its Human Rights mechanisms and to promote further the protection of human rights and fundamental freedom. As the last phase to implement the ASEAN Vision 2020 and the establishment of the ASEAN Community 2015, the ASEAN Political-Security Community Blueprint, particularly under section A.1.5, charted the way forward to further strengthen ASEAN's commitment on the promotion and protection of human rights.

The ASEAN Intergovernmental Commission on Human Rights (AICHR) established as the follow up the entry into force of the ASEAN Charter, took up its role as the ASEAN overarching mechanism to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedom in close collaboration with other mechanisms, including the ACWC. Although the current role of the AICHR is mainly focusing on human rights promotion, however, a significant progress has been achieved in its work to develop the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration (AHRD), which was endorsed by the ASEAN Leaders through the Phnom Penh Statement on the adoption of the ASEAN Human Rights Declaration.

ASEAN Declaration on Strengthening Social Protection. Association of South East Asian Nations [Internet]. 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://aichr.org/documents/

We, the Heads of State/Government of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (hereinafter referred to as “ASEAN”), namely Brunei Darussalam, the Kingdom of Cambodia, the Republic of Indonesia, the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Malaysia, the Republic of the Union of Myanmar, the Republic of the Philippines, the Republic of Singapore, the Kingdom of Thailand and the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam, on the occasion of the 23rd ASEAN Summit in Brunei Darussalam.

Breaking the Silence on Violence against Indigenous Girls, Adolescents and Young Women. UN Women, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the International Labour Organization (ILO) and the Office of the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Violence against Children (OSRSG/VAC); 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unwomen.org/en/digital-library/publications/2013/5/breaking-t...

The study, the first of its kind, reviews existing quantitative and qualitative data on the prevalence and incidence of the types of violence which have already been documented in relation to these groups in Africa, Asia and Latin America. Three countries were selected, one per region, to illustrate the findings. For Latin America, Guatemala was selected for the study to benefit from its widely documented experience as a post-conflict country and for its on-going legislative and institutional reforms aimed at addressing issues such as femicide and sexual violence among indigenous women and girls. For Africa, Kenya was chosen, given available evidence on the prevalence of female genital mutilation/cutting among indigenous communities and promising legislative developments in this field. Finally, in the Asia-Pacific region, the Philippines was selected because of the involvement of girls and adolescents in armed conflict in the predominantly indigenous area of Mindanao and accompanying initiatives to address this situation. 

Haugli H. Tackling discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity. [Internet]. 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://assembly.coe.int/nw/xml/XRef/Xref-DocDetails-EN.asp?fileid=19779&lang=EN&search=U2V4dWFsIG9yaWVudGF0aW9ufHR5cGVfc3RyX2VuOlJlcG9ydA==

Since 2010, when both the Parliamentary Assembly and the Committee of Ministers adopted far-reaching texts on how to tackle discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity, important positive developments have occurred in some Council of Europe member States, including the introduction of specific legislative measures, action plans and strategies.

Despite this progress, however, prejudice against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons (LGBTs) is widespread in society. Discrimination against LGBTs remains a serious problem, as indicated by repeated infringements of the rights to freedom of expression and peaceful assembly, and the authorities’ failure to provide protection against homophobic and transphobic violence. The introduction of legislation or draft legislation on the prohibition of so-called homosexual propaganda in countries such as Lithuania, the Republic of Moldova, the Russian Federation and Ukraine is at variance with these countries’ legal obligations. It would also legitimise the prejudice against LGBTs which all too often is fuelled by inconsiderate discourse by politicians and other authoritative figures.

Council of Europe member States should take measures to prevent discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation and gender identity, promote equality and tackle homophobia and transphobia. The Republic of Moldova, Poland and the Russian Federation should give full execution to the judgments of the European Court of Human Rights.

The Committee of Ministers should continue to strengthen its activities in this area with a view to ensuring the full implementation of its Recommendation CM/Rec(2010)5.

Qureshi S. The Emergence/Extention of Due Diligence Standard to Assess the State Response towards Violence against Women/Domestic Violence. An International Journal of South Asian Studies [Internet]. 2013;28 (1) :55-66. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://pu.edu.pk/home/journal/9/Vol_28_No_1_2013.html

This article begins by providing a brief summary of emergence of due diligence principle in the International human rights law. The article then explores the role of International/regional human rights mechanisms/instruments in clarifying and specifying the content of due diligence obligations and its application in the context of violence against women. It illuminates, in particular, the contribution of the reports prepared by the mandate holders of United Nations Special Rapporteurs on violence against women, its causes and consequences. The article argues that the criterion has been useful in dealing with gender based violence within a human rights framework since it provides a yardstick to determine what constitutes effective fulfilment of the obligation (Manjoo, 2001). It concludes by taking note of Pakistan’s level of compliance with due diligence obligation particularly in the area of ‘prevention’ of violence against women. 

Rosche D. Ending Violence Against Women, The case for a comprehensive international action plan.; 2013. Publisher's VersionAbstract

https://www.oxfam.org/en/research/ending-violence-against-women-0

This Oxfam policy paper outlines a proposal for a comprehensive international action plan that addresses this issue politically, with time-bound targets and explicit accountability mechanisms – a roadmap to fast-track the implementation of existing agreements.

Padilla CR. Asia Pacific Roundtable: International and Regional Standard setting to eliminate Violence Against Women 2013, in Asia Pacific Roundtable. Bali, Indonesia ; 2013.Abstract

This paper provides background information on the international legal and policy framework on
violence against women, plural legal systems and women’s movements for the participants
attending the Asia Pacific Roundtable: International and Regional Standard setting to eliminate
Violence Against Women 2013, set to be held on 7 and 8 Dec, in Bali, Indonesia.

asia_pacific_roundtable_international_and_regional_standard_setting_to_eliminate_vaw_2013-by_clara_rita_padilla.pdf
2012
for and the of Women UNEGEE. Virtual Knowledge Centre to end Violence Against Women and Girls. [Internet]. 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.endvawnow.org/

The Virtual Knowledge Centre to End Violence against Women and Girls is an online resource in English, French and Spanish, designed to serve the needs of policymakers, programme implementers and other practitioners dedicated to addressing violence against women and girls. The Centre is an initiative of UN Women, bringing together the valuable contributions of expert organizations and individuals, governments, United Nations sister agencies, and a wide range of relevant actors. Part of the overall effort is encouraging shared ownership of the site and ongoing partnership-building for its continuous development and sustainability.

Poland to sign European convention combating violence against women.; 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.thenews.pl/1/10/Artykul/120471,Poland-to-sign-European-conven...

After opposition from the Church, the Polish government has decided to sign the Council of Europe's Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women. 

Prime Minister Donald Tusk said that the government had taken the decision at Tuesday's Council of Ministers meeting.

Minta A. A (Polish) History of Violence: The Difficulties of Advancing Women's Rights in the 21st Century. Crossing the Baltic [Internet]. 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://crossingthebaltic.com/2012/05/14/a-polish-history-of-violence-the...

This April, a fresh controversy related to gender politics took Polish media by storm. Jarosław Gowin, Poland’s current minister of justice and a Civic Platform politician, stated loud and proud that he would vehemently oppose the signing and ratification of the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence.

Informe para la ONU sobre la violencia contra las mujeres y los feminicidios en Chihuahua. Mukira; 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://mukira.org/publicaciones/

El cuarto documento en este página

Este informe contiene estadísticas oficiales sobre el número de homicidios de mujeres en el estado de Chihuahua en los últimos 20 años, y casos paradigmáticos de violencia de género. El documento fue elaborado por Justicia para Nuestras Hijas, el Centro de Derechos Humanos de las Mujeres (CEDEHM) y Mukira, y presentado en el verano de 2012 ante el Comité para la Eliminación de Todas las Formas de Discriminación (CEDAW) de la ONU.

Meyersfeld BC. Introductory Note to the Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence. International Legal Materials [Internet]. 2012;51 (1) :106-132. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5305/intelegamate.51.1.0106

*The full article is available through this link. This article may be available free of charge to those with university credentials.

The Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence (‘‘Convention’’)1 joins a small number of treaties imposing specific obligations on member states to prevent and address violence against women. The Convention is notable both for its encapsulation of best practices in combating violence against women and for its confirmation that all forms of violence against women, including domestic violence, are human rights violations for which states are responsible.

Meyersfeld BC. Introductory Note to the Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence. International LEgal Materials [Internet]. 2012;51 (1) :106-132. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5305/intelegamate.51.1.0106

The Council of Europe Convention on Preventing and Combating Violence against Women and Domestic Violence (‘‘Convention’’)1 joins a small number of treaties imposing specific obligations on member states to prevent and address violence against women. The Convention is notable both for its encapsulation of best practices in combating violence against women and for its confirmation that all forms of violence against women, including domestic violence, are human rights violations for which states are responsible.

2012 Department of State Trafficking in Persons Country Narratives. US Department of State [Internet]. 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.state.gov/j/tip/rls/tiprpt/2012/index.htm

Remarks from Hillary Clinton on the release of the report: In this year’s report, we are especially focused on that third P, victim protection. And in these pages, you’ll find a lot of proven practices and innovative approaches to protecting victims. This is a useful and specific guide for governments looking to scale up their own efforts. What kind of psychological support might a victim need? How should immigration laws work to protect migrant victims? How can labor inspectors learn to recognize the warning signs of traffickers? And what can you and all of us do to try to help?

Supplement to the Handbook for Legislation on Violence against Women, "Harmful Practices" Against Women. United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women; 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unwomen.org/en/digital-library/publications/2012/12/handbook-...

The Handbook serves as a useful tool in supporting efforts to provide justice, support, protection and remedies to victims and to hold perpetrators accountable.

The Handbook first outlines the international and regional legal and policy frameworks which mandate States to enact and implement comprehensive and effective laws to address violence against women. It then presents a model framework for legislation on violence against women, divided into fourteen chapters. Finally, the Handbook provides users with a checklist of considerations to be kept in mind when drafting legislation on violence against women.

This Handbook intends to provide all stakeholders with detailed guidance to support the adoption and effective implementation of legislation which prevents violence against women, punishes perpetrators, and ensures the rights of survivors everywhere.

 

Grape M. The Role of Faith Based Organisations in a Strategy to Eliminate Violence Against Women and Girls. [Internet]. 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unwomen.org/en/csw/previous-sessions/csw57-2013/preparations/expert-group-meeting

This presentation does not reflect a formal position of the World Council of Churches. It does not have any ambitions to be a scientific contribution to the discussion of the expert group. Instead, my paper is basically a reflection of my own experience of working for thirty-five years in the intersection of faith and politics, both out of Sweden and in the global arena.

It is a scandal that violence against women is still an everyday reality in the lives of hundreds of thousands of women and girls all over the world. The scandal is aggravated by the fact that, more often than not, victims are accused of bringing the violence upon themselves – for being disobedient wives or for dressing in a provocative way, or for any number of reasons, all of which aim at pushing the responsibility from the perpetrator to the victim.

The magnitude of the on-going violence against women, in homes, in public spaces, and in wars and conflicts, is well-known and carefully documented. Scientific studies and testimonies from abused women have been presented over the years at conferences, in reports, in media, and in courts of law. No one can say: We did not know.

Case of Irene Wilson v. the U.K. European Court of Human Rights; 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/sites/eng/pages/search.aspx?i=001-114397#{"itemid":["001-114397"]}

Summary

The European Court of Human Rights found that the Northern Ireland authorities had not failed in their duty to respond to domestic violence perpetrated against the applicant, Ms Irene Wilson, and her complaint was deemed inadmissible.

Facts

On 20 October 2007 the applicant was assaulted by her husband, Scott Wilson. She suffered a severed artery on the right side of her head and multiple bruising.

Mr Wilson was arrested and charged with causing grievous bodily harm with intent to do grievous bodily harm, contrary to section 18 of the Offences against the Person Act 1861. After considering the available evidence, the Public Prosecution Service of Northern Ireland (PPS) decided that there was insufficient evidence of intention to do grievous bodily harm and the charge was reduced to one of grievous bodily harm contrary to section 20 of the same Act.

Mr Wilson pleaded guilty to the section 20 charge and was sentenced to eighteen months’ imprisonment, which was suspended for three years.

The applicant alleged violations of her human rights under the European Convention on Human Rights and made several complaints regarding the criminal proceedings, including that the sentence was unduly lenient and was much lower than would have been delivered had the offence occurred outside marriage.

Understanding and Addressing Violence Against Women Overview. World Health Organization; 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/violence/rhr12_35/en/

WHO and PAHO have developed a series of information sheets on violence against women that summarizes what is known about the prevalence, patterns, consequences, risk factors and strategies to address the different forms of VAW. This series is for programme managers, practitioners, researchers, policy-makers and others working in a wide range of sectors and in every country.

Case of Kalucza v. Hungary. European Court of Human Rights; 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/sites/eng/Pages/search.aspx#{"fulltext":["Kalucza%20v.%20Hungary"],"documentcollectionid2":["GRANDCHAMBER","CHAMBER"]}

1. The case originated in an application (no. 57693/10) against the Republic of Hungary lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by a Hungarian national, Ms Matild Kalucza (“the applicant”), on 25 September 2010.

2. The applicant was represented by Ms G. Zsemlye, a lawyer practising in Budapest. The Hungarian Government (“the Government”) were represented by Mr L. Höltzl, Agent, Ministry of Public Administration and Justice.

3. The applicant complained that the authorities had failed to respect her rights under Articles 2, 3 and 8 of the Convention insofar as they did not comply with their positive obligations, as a result of which she was forced to live with a person who constantly abused her physically and psychologically. 

Case of M and Others v. Italy and Bulgaria. European Court of Human Rights; 2012. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://hudoc.echr.coe.int/sites/eng/Pages/search.aspx#{"fulltext":["M%20and%20Others%20v.%20Italy%20and%20Bulgaria"],"documentcollectionid2":["GRANDCHAMBER","CHAMBER"]}

1.  The case originated in an application (no. 40020/03) against the Italian Republic lodged with the Court under Article 34 of the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms (“the Convention”) by four Bulgarian nationals, L.M., S.M., I.I., and K.L. (“the applicants”), on 11 December 2003

2.  The applicants were represented by Mr S.S. Marinov, manager of Civil Association Regional Future, Vidin. The Italian Government were represented initially by their Co-Agent, Mr N. Lettieri, and subsequently by their Co-Agent, Ms P. Accardo. The Bulgarian Government were represented initially by their Agent, Ms N. Nikolova, and subsequently by their Agent, Ms M. Dimova.

3.  The applicants alleged, in particular, that there had been a violation of Article 3 in respect of the lack of adequate steps to prevent the first applicant’s ill-treatment by a Serbian family by securing her swift release and the lack of an effective investigation into that alleged ill-treatment.

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