Publications by Year: 2002

2002
Sullivan CM, Bybee DI, Allen NE. Findings From a Community-Based Program for Battered Women and Their Children. Journal of Interpersonal Violence [Internet]. 2002;17 (9) :915-936. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://jiv.sagepub.com/content/17/9/915.short

*The full article is available through this link. This article may be available free of charge to those with university credentials.

The effectiveness of a strengths-and community-based support and advocacy intervention for battered women and their children was examined. The study included a longitudinal, experimental design and employed multimethod strategies to measure children's exposure to abuse and their self-competence over a period of 8 months. Maternal experience of abuse and maternal well-being were also assessed. The experimental intervention involved advocacy for mothers and their children and a 10-week support and education group for the children. Families in the experimental condition received the free services of a trained paraprofessional for 6 to 8 hours per week over 16 weeks. Eighty mothers and their 80 children participated in the study. Findings were modest but promising. Children in the experimental condition reported significantly higher self-competence in several domains compared to children in the control group. The intervention caused improvement in women's depression and self-esteem over time. Policy, practice and research implications are discussed.

Bybee DI, Sullivan CM. The process through which an advocacy intervention resulted in positive change for battered women over time. American Journal of Psychology [Internet]. 2002;30 (1) :103-132. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11928772

*The full article is available through this link. This article may be available free of charge to those with university credentials.

A prior experimental evaluation of a community-based advocacy program for women with abusive partners demonstrated positive change in the lives of women even 2 years postintervention (C M. Sullivan & D. I. Bybee, 1999). The current study explored the complex mediational process through which this change occurred, using longitudinal structural equation modeling and formal tests of mediation. As hypothesized, the advocacy intervention first resulted in women successfully obtaining desired community resources and increasing their social support, which enhanced their overall quality of life. This improvement in well-being appeared to serve as a protective factor from subsequent abuse, as women who received the intervention were significantly less likely to be abused at 2-year follow-up compared with women in the control condition. Increased quality of life completely mediated the impact of the advocacy intervention on later reabuse. Discussion places advocacy for women in the context of other efforts that are needed to build an effective community response to preventing intimate violence against women.

Alméras D, Bravo R, Milosavljevic V, Montaño S, Nieves Rico M. Violencia contra la mujer en relación de pareja: América Latina y el Caribe. Una propuesta para medir su magnitud y evolución. Santiago de Chile: CEPAL; 2002 pp. 52. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.cepal.org/es/publicaciones/5896-violencia-contra-la-mujer-en-...

El documento ha sido preparado por la Unidad Mujer y Desarrollo de la CEPAL como un insumo para la Reunión 'estadísticas e Indicadores de género para medir incidencia y evolución de la violencia contra la mujer en América Latina y el Caribe' que se realizó en La Paz, Bolivia, del 21 al 23 de Noviembre de 2001. El documento recoge los aportes realizados por los participantes al documento de trabajo presentado por la CEPAL durante la reunión y es una herramienta que contribuye a medir la magnitud y las principales características de la violencia contra la mujer en relación de pareja.

Council of Europe Recommendation (2002)5 & Explanatory Note. Council of Europe [Internet]. 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://euromed-justice.eu/document/coe-2002-recommendation-rec-5-committ...

The Committee of Ministers, under the terms of Article 15.b of the Statute of the Council of Europe, Reaffirming that violence towards women is the result of an imbalance of power between men and women and is leading to serious discrimination against the female sex, both within society and within the family; Affirming that violence against women both violates and impairs or nullifies the enjoyment of their human rights and fundamental freedoms; Noting that violence against women constitutes a violation of their physical, psychological and/or sexual integrity; Noting with concern that women are often subjected to multiple discrimination on ground of their gender as well as their origin, including as victims of traditional or customary practices inconsistent with their human rights and fundamental freedoms; Considering that violence against women runs counter to the establishment of equality and peace and constitutes a major obstacle to citizens’ security and democracy in Europe; Noting with concern the extent of violence against women in the family, whatever form the family takes, and at all levels of society; Considering it urgent to combat this phenomenon which affects all European societies and concerns all their members

Rehn E, Sirleaf EJ. Women, War and Peace - Executive Summary. United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM); 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unwomen.org/en/digital-library/publications/2002/1/women-war-...

"Women, War and Peace" covers topics such as peace operations, use of media, reconstruction, health, and prevention. By sharing the personal stories of women involved in these efforts, the book shows that through willingness and support, there is hope that women will be continually involved in peace operations. 

Rehn E, Sirleaf EJ. Women, War and Peace - Experts' Biographical Sketches. United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM); 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unwomen.org/en/digital-library/publications/2002/1/women-war-...

"Women, War and Peace" covers topics such as peace operations, use of media, reconstruction, health, and prevention. By sharing the personal stories of women involved in these efforts, the book shows that through willingness and support, there is hope that women will be continually involved in peace operations.

Rehn E, Sirleaf EJ. Women, War and Peace - Media Kit. United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM); 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unwomen.org/en/digital-library/publications/2002/1/women-war-...

"Women, War and Peace" covers topics such as peace operations, use of media, reconstruction, health, and prevention. By sharing the personal stories of women involved in these efforts, the book shows that through willingness and support, there is hope that women will be continually involved in peace operations. 

Krug EG, Dahlberg LL, Mercy JA, Zwi AB, Lozano R ed. World Report on Violence and Health. Geneva: World Health Organization; 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/world_report/en/

The World Health Organization launched the first World report on violence and health on October 3rd, 2002. Since then, more than 30 governments have organized national launches or policy discussions about the Report, and resolutions endorsing the Report and calling for its implementation have been passed in a number of fora, such as the World Health Assembly, the United Nations High Commission on Human Rights, and the African Union.

The World report on violence and health is the first comprehensive review of the problem of violence on a global scale – what it is, whom it affects and what can be done about it. Three years in the making, the report benefited from the participation of over 160 experts from around the world, receiving both peer-review from scientists and contributions and comments from representatives of all the world’s regions.

Rome Statute. International Criminal Court [Internet]. 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

https://www.icc-cpi.int/nr/rdonlyres/ea9aeff7-5752-4f84-be94-0a655eb30e1...

 

The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (often referred to as the International Criminal Court Statute or the Rome Statute) is the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC). It was adopted at a diplomatic conference in Rome on 17 July 1998 and it entered into force on 1 July 2002.‪ As of 6 January 2015, 123 states are party to the statute. Among other things, the statute establishes the court's functions, jurisdiction and structure.

War-Related Sexual Violence in Sierra Leone. Boston: Physicians for Human Rights; 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://physiciansforhumanrights.org/library/reports/war-related-sexual-v...

Sierra Leone’s decade-long conflict of the 1990s and onward was marked by an extraordinary level of brutal human rights abuses, including summary killings, sexual violence against women and girls, abductions, amputations, and the use of child soldiers.

The combined effects of prolonged conflict, pervasive human rights abuses, and massive forced migration in one of the poorest countries in the world, devastated the health and well-being of the Sierra Leonean people. The daunting process of rebuilding and reconciliation in the aftermath of such destruction requires the establishment of an accurate account of the nature and extent of abuses that were committed.

Recommendation Rec(2002)5 of the Committee of Ministers to member states on the protection of women against violence. Committee of Ministers, Council of Europe [Internet]. 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

https://wcd.coe.int/ViewDoc.jsp?id=280915

Recommendation Rec(2002)5 of the Committee of Ministers to member states on the protection of women against violence 1 

(Adopted by the Committee of Ministers on 30 April 2002 at the 794th meeting of the Ministers’ Deputies)

The Committee of Ministers, under the terms of Article 15.b of the Statute of the Council of Europe,

Reaffirming that violence towards women is the result of an imbalance of power between men and women and is leading to serious discrimination against the female sex, both within society and within the family;

Affirming that violence against women both violates and impairs or nullifies the enjoyment of their human rights and fundamental freedoms;

Noting that violence against women constitutes a violation of their physical, psychological and/or sexual integrity;

Noting with concern that women are often subjected to multiple discrimination on ground of their gender as well as their origin, including as victims of traditional or customary practices inconsistent with their human rights and fundamental freedoms.

SAARC Convention on Preventing and Combating Trafficking in Women and Children for Prostitution. South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation [Internet]. 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://evaw-global-database.unwomen.org/en/countries/asia/india/2002/sou...

In 2002, the South Asian Regional Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) signed a Convention on Preventing and Combating Trafficking in Women and Children for Prostitution.

Rome Statute. International Criminal Court [Internet]. 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://legal.un.org/icc/statute/romefra.htm

The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (often referred to as the International Criminal Court Statute or the Rome Statute) is the treaty that established the International Criminal Court (ICC). It was adopted at a diplomatic conference in Rome on 17 July 1998[5][6]and it entered into force on 1 July 2002.[2] As of 6 January 2015, 123 states are party to the statute.[2] Among other things, the statute establishes the court's functions, jurisdiction and structure.

The Rome Statute established four core international crimes: genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression. Those crimes "shall not be subject to any statute of limitations".[7]Under the Rome Statute, the ICC can only investigate and prosecute the four core international crimes in situations where states are "unable" or "unwilling" to do so themselves. The court has jurisdiction over crimes only if they are committed in the territory of a state party or if they are committed by a national of a state party; an exception to this rule is that the ICC may also have jurisdiction over crimes if its jurisdiction is authorized by the United Nations Security Council.

Women, War, Peace: The Independent Experts’ Assessment on the Impact of Armed Conflict on Women and Women’s Role in Peace-Building (Progress of the World’s Women 2002, Vol. 1) . UN Women; 2002. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.unwomen.org/en/digital-library/publications/2002/1/women-war-...

Historically, the world has been silent about the situation of women in war, almost as silent as the women who remain on the sidelines during war or who are excluded from peace negotiations. In addition, women often lack the confidence and the knowledge needed to participate in peace building and reconstruction.

But change is possible. "Women, War and Peace" provides examples of women in embattled regions who have been able to overcome the odds and contribute to the safety and well-being of their communities. Personal stories are shared of women involved in peace efforts.

During the Taliban regime, women in Afghanistan held secret meetings, creating maps of underground home schools and medical help, and dispersed this knowledge with other women. In Sudan, women from opposing ethnic and religious groups joined together to discuss peace; a task that men had not been successful in accomplishing. This consortium of stories reveals that, around the world, much could be accomplished if women had proper support and training. "Women, War and Peace" provides similar recommendations at the end of each chapter so that educators, policy makers or anyone interested in women and peace can understand the steps that would lead to greater progress in the area of peace and conflict resolution.

"Women, War and Peace" covers topics such as peace operations, use of media, reconstruction, health, and prevention. By sharing the personal stories of women involved in these efforts, the book shows that through willingness and support, there is hope that women will be continually involved in peace operations