EBook

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The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
Alexander, Michelle. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. Rev. ed. New York: New Press, 2012. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
A stunning account of the rebirth of a caste-like system in the United States, one that has resulted in millions of African Americans locked behind bars and then relegated to a permanent second-class status—denied the very rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights Movement.
White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
Anderson, Carol. White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide. New York: Bloomsbury, 2016. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America. Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, White Rage will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.
One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy
Anderson, Carol. One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy. New York: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

Chronicles the rollbacks to African American participation in the vote since the Supreme Court's 2013 Shelby ruling, which allowed districts to change voting requirements without approval from the Department of Justice.

Print Book Available (HOLLIS# 990153045950203941)

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Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People
Banaji, Mahzarin R., and Anthony G. Greenwald. Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People. 1st ed. New York: Delacorte Press, 2013. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
The authors explore hidden biases that we all carry from a lifetime of experiences with social groups – age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, social class, sexuality, disability status, or nationality.
Civil rights and beyond: African American and Latino/a activism in the twentieth-century United States
Behnken, Brian D., ed. Civil rights and beyond: African American and Latino/a activism in the twentieth-century United States. Athens: The University of Georgia Press, 2016. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
Civil Rights and Beyond examines the dynamic relationships between African American and Latino/a activists in the United States from the 1930s to the present day. Building on recent scholarship, this book pushes the timeframe for the study of interactions between blacks and a variety of Latino/a groups beyond the standard chronology of the civil rights era. As such, the book merges a host of community histories–each with their own distinct historical experiences and activisms–to explore group dynamics, differing strategies and activist moments, and the broader quests of these communities for rights and social justice. The collection is framed around the concept of “activism,” which most fully encompasses the relationships that blacks and Latinos have enjoyed throughout the twentieth century. Wide ranging and pioneering, Civil Rights and Beyond explores black and Latino/a activism from California to Florida, Chicago to Bakersfield–and a host of other communities and cities–to demonstrate the complicated nature of African American-Latino/a activism in the twentieth-century United States.–Publisher website.
From Oppression to Grace: Women of Color and Their Dilemmas within the Academy
Berry, Theodorea Regina, and Nathalie Mizelle, ed. From Oppression to Grace: Women of Color and Their Dilemmas within the Academy. Herndon, United States: Stylus Publishing, 2011. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This book gives voice to the experiences of women of color–women of African, Native American, Latina, East Indian, Korean and Japanese descent–as students pursuing terminal degrees and as faculty members navigating the Academy, grappling with the dilemmas encountered by others and themselves as they exist at the intersections of their work and identities. This book uses critical race feminism (CRF) to place women of color in the center, rather than the margins, of the discussion, theorizing, research and praxis of their lives as they co-exist in the dominant culture. The first part of the book addresses the issues faced on the way to achieving a terminal degree: the struggles encountered and the lessons learned along the way. Part Two, "Pride and Prejudice: Finding Your Place After the Degree" describes the complexity of lives of women with multiple identities as scholars with family, friends, and lives at home and at work. The book concludes with the voices of senior faculty sharing their journeys and their paths to growth as scholars and individuals. 
What Works: Gender Equality by Design
Bohnet, Iris. What Works: Gender Equality by Design. Cambridge, MA: The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Gender equality is a moral and a business imperative. But unconscious bias holds us back and de-biasing minds has proven to be difficult and expensive. Behavioral design offers a new solution. Iris Bohnet shows that by de-biasing organizations instead of individuals, we can make smart changes that have big impacts--often at low cost and high speed.
Teaching With Tension: Race, Resistance and Reality in the Classroom
Bolton, Philathia, Cassander Smith, and Lee Bebout, ed. Teaching With Tension: Race, Resistance and Reality in the Classroom. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2019. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
"A collection of seventeen original essays that address the extent to which attitudes about race, impacted by the current political moment in the United States, have produced pedagogical challenges for professors in the humanities. As a flashpoint, this current political moment is defined by the visibility of the country's first black president, the election of his successor, whose presidency has been associated with an increased visibility of the alt-right, and the emergence of the neoliberal university. Together these social currents shape the tensions with which we teach"-provided by the publisher.
Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America
Bonilla-Silva, Eduardo. Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
Eduardo Bonilla-Silva's acclaimed Racism without Racists is a provocative book that explodes the belief that America is now a color-blind society. The fifth edition includes a new chapter addressing what readers can do to confront racism, new material on the racial climate post-Obama, new coverage of the Black Lives Matter movement, and more.
Growing up Muslim in Europe and the United States
Bozorgmehr, Mehdi, and Phillip Kasinitz, ed. Growing up Muslim in Europe and the United States. New York: Routledge, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This volume brings together scholarship from two different, and until now, largely separate literatures--the study of the children of immigrants and the study of Muslim minority communities--in order to explore the changing nature of ethnic identity, religious practice, and citizenship in the contemporary western world. With attention to the similarities and differences between the European and American experiences of growing up Muslim, the contributing authors ask what it means for young people to be both Muslim and American or European, how they reconcile these, at times, conflicting identities, how they reconcile the religious and gendered cultural norms of their immigrant families with the more liberal ideals of the western societies that they live in, and how they deal with these issues through mobilization and political incorporation. A transatlantic research effort that brings together work from the tradition in diaspora studies with research on the second generation, to examine social, cultural, and political dimensions of the second-generation Muslim experience in Europe and the United States, this book will appeal to scholars across the social sciences with interests in migration, diaspora, race and ethnicity, religion and integration.
Teaching Race: How to Help Students Unmask and Challenge Racism
Brookfield, Stephen. Teaching Race: How to Help Students Unmask and Challenge Racism. San Francisco, CA: Jossey Bass, 2019. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
A real-world how-to manual for talking about race in the classroom Educators and activists frequently call for the need to address the lingering presence of racism in higher education. Yet few books offer specific suggestions and advice on how to introduce race to students who believe we live in a post-racial world where racism is no longer a real issue. In Teaching Race the authors offer practical tools and techniques for teaching and discussing racial issues at predominately White institutions of higher education. 
Being Black, Being Male on Campus :Understanding and Confronting Black Male Collegiate Experiences
Brooms, Derrick R. Being Black, Being Male on Campus :Understanding and Confronting Black Male Collegiate Experiences. Albany: SUNY Press, 2017. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Explores how race and gender matter on campus and how black males navigate college for academic and personal success
Disability and Employer Practices: Research Across the Disciplines
Bruyère, Susanne M., ed. Disability and Employer Practices: Research Across the Disciplines. Ithica: Cornell University Press, 2016. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Disability and Employer Practices features research-based documentation of workplace policies and practices that result in the successful recruitment, retention, advancement, and inclusion of individuals with disabilities.The Cornell team whose work is featured in this book drew from multiple disciplines, data sources, and methodologies to learn where employment disparities for people with disabilities occur and to identify workplace policies and practices that might remediate them.
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Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation
Clare, Eli. Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation. Cambridge, MA: South End Press, 2009. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
 
Occupying the Academy: Just How Important Is Diversity Work in Higher Education?
Clark, Christine, Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, and Mark Brimhall-Vargas, ed. Occupying the Academy: Just How Important Is Diversity Work in Higher Education?. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc, 2012. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This book looks courageously at diversity in higher education through critical, social justice-oriented theoretical lenses. The strength of this edited volume rests in the various case studies as told from the perspective of academic leaders specifically employed as chief diversity officers, mid-level administrators, and faculty members. These case studies uncover the persistent challenges of racism in higher education.
Between the World and Me
Coates, Ta-Nehisi. Between the World and Me. New York: Spiegel & Grau, 2015. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of "race," a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men–bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates's attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son–and readers–the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children's lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward."–Publisher's description. 

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Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment
Collins, Patricia Hill. Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment. New York: Routledge, 2002. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
In spite of the double burden of racial and gender discrimination, African-American women have developed a rich intellectual tradition that is not widely known.
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The Color of Mind: Why the Origins of the Achievement Gap Matter for Justice
Darby, Derrick, and John L. Rury. The Color of Mind: Why the Origins of the Achievement Gap Matter for Justice. History and philosophy of education. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Rejecting the view that racial differences in educational achievement are a product of innate or cultural differences, Darby and Rury uncover the historical interplay between ideas about race and American schooling, to show clearly that the racial achievement gap has been socially and institutionally constructed.
Women, Race & Class
Davis, Angela Y. Women, Race & Class. Black women writers series. 1st ed. New York: Vintage Books, Random House, 1983. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Longtime activist, author and political figure, Angela Davis, brings us this expose of the women's movement in the context of the fight for civil rights and working class issues. She uncovers a side of the fight for suffrage many of us have not heard: the intimate tie between the anti-slavery campaign and the struggle for women's suffrage. She shows how the racist and classist bias of some in the women's movement have divided its own membership.
White Fragility: Why It's so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism
DiAngelo, Robin J. White Fragility: Why It's so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism. Boston: Beacon Press, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"In this groundbreaking and timely book, antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility. Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo explores how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively."- Publisher's description.

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