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Inclusive Leadership: Negotiating Gendered Spaces
Adapa, Sujana, and Alison Sheridan, ed. Inclusive Leadership: Negotiating Gendered Spaces. Palgrave studies in leadership and followership. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018. View the BookAbstract
Examining perceptions of leaders which are dependent on social and cultural contexts, this edited collection argues that in order to thrive and to understand the future business landscape, leaders must be inclusive and create followership. Addressing the under-representation of women in leadership roles, contributions explore inclusivity and exclusivity in leading organisations, the politics of gendered differences and the value of leader-follower dynamics.
The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness
Alexander, Michelle. The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness. Rev. ed. New York: New Press, 2012. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract
A stunning account of the rebirth of a caste-like system in the United States, one that has resulted in millions of African Americans locked behind bars and then relegated to a permanent second-class status—denied the very rights supposedly won in the Civil Rights Movement.
One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy
Anderson, Carol. One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy. New York: Bloomsbury Publishing, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

Chronicles the rollbacks to African American participation in the vote since the Supreme Court's 2013 Shelby ruling, which allowed districts to change voting requirements without approval from the Department of Justice.

Print Book Available (HOLLIS# 990153045950203941)

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Teaching for Critical Thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question Their Assumptions
Brookfield, Stephen. Teaching for Critical Thinking: Tools and Techniques to Help Students Question Their Assumptions. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2012. View the BookAbstract
Stephen Brookfield builds on his last three decades of experience running workshops and teaching courses on critical thinking to explore how student learn to think this way, and what teachers can do the help students develop this capacity. He outlines a basic protocol of critical thinking as a learning process that focuses on uncovering and checking assumptions, exploring alternative perspectives, and taking informed actions as a result.
The Best We Could Do: An Illustrated Memoir
Bui, Thi. The Best We Could Do: An Illustrated Memoir. New York: Abrams Comicarts, 2017. View the BookAbstract
The author describes her experiences as a young Vietnamese immigrant, highlighting her family's move from their war-torn home to the United States in graphic novel format.
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Muslims, Identity, and American Politics
Calfano, Brian Robert. Muslims, Identity, and American Politics. Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge, 2018. View the BookAbstract
An examination of the pressures faced by Muslims, often considered political and social outsiders in western nations. Though citizens and second generation residents in many cases, American Muslims face a combination of suspicion, government scrutiny, and social segregation in the United States. The book examines how group influence, emotions, and religious interpretation contribute to the political orientation and behaviour of a national sample of Muslims living in the American context. A compelling explanation of how members of an ostracized political group marshal the motivation to become fully engaged political actors.
Borders of Belonging: Struggle and Solidarity in Mixed-Status Immigrant Families
Castañeda, Heide. Borders of Belonging: Struggle and Solidarity in Mixed-Status Immigrant Families. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2019. View the BookAbstract
Borders of Belonging investigates a pressing but previously unexplored aspect of immigration in America―the impact of immigration policies and practices not only on undocumented migrants, but also on their family members, some of whom possess a form of legal status.
Between the World and Me
Coates, Ta-Nehisi. Between the World and Me. New York: Spiegel & Grau, 2015. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"In a profound work that pivots from the biggest questions about American history and ideals to the most intimate concerns of a father for his son, Ta-Nehisi Coates offers a powerful new framework for understanding our nation's history and current crisis. Americans have built an empire on the idea of "race," a falsehood that damages us all but falls most heavily on the bodies of black women and men–bodies exploited through slavery and segregation, and, today, threatened, locked up, and murdered out of all proportion. What is it like to inhabit a black body and find a way to live within it? And how can we all honestly reckon with this fraught history and free ourselves from its burden? Between the World and Me is Ta-Nehisi Coates's attempt to answer these questions in a letter to his adolescent son. Coates shares with his son–and readers–the story of his awakening to the truth about his place in the world through a series of revelatory experiences, from Howard University to Civil War battlefields, from the South Side of Chicago to Paris, from his childhood home to the living rooms of mothers whose children's lives were taken as American plunder. Beautifully woven from personal narrative, reimagined history, and fresh, emotionally charged reportage, Between the World and Me clearly illuminates the past, bracingly confronts our present, and offers a transcendent vision for a way forward."–Publisher's description. 

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White Fragility: Why It's so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism
DiAngelo, Robin J. White Fragility: Why It's so Hard for White People to Talk About Racism. Boston: Beacon Press, 2018. View the eBook (Harvard Key required)Abstract

"In this groundbreaking and timely book, antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility. Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo explores how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively."- Publisher's description.

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Has the Gay Movement Failed?
Duberman, Martin B, Has the Gay Movement Failed?. Oakland, CA: University of California Press, 2018. View the BookAbstract
The past fifty years have seen significant shifts in attitudes toward LGBTQ people and wider acceptance of them in the United States and the West. Yet the extent of this progress, argues Martin Duberman, has been more broad and conservative than deep and transformative. One of the most renowned historians of the American left and LGBTQ movement, as well as a pioneering social-justice activist, Duberman reviews the fifty years since Stonewall with an immediacy and rigor that informs and energizes. He revisits the early gay movement and its progressive vision for society, and puts the left on notice as failing time and again to embrace the queer potential for social transformation. Acknowledging the elimination of some of the most discriminatory policies that plagued earlier generations, he takes note of the cost--the sidelining of radical goals on the way to achieving more normative inclusion. Illuminating the fault lines both within and beyond the movements of the past and today, this critical book is also hopeful. Duberman urges us to learn from this history to fight for a truly inclusive and expansive society.
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Critical Approaches to Women and Gender in Higher Education
Eddy, Pamela Lynn, Kelly Ward, and Tehmina Khwaja, ed. Critical Approaches to Women and Gender in Higher Education. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017. View the BookAbstract
Despite the increasing numbers of women in higher education, gendered structures continue to hinder women’s advancement in academia. This book goes beyond the numbers to examine the issues facing those members of academia with non-dominant gender identities.
College Curriculum at the Crossroads: Women of Color Reflect and Resist
Edwards, Kirsten T., and Maria Guadalupe del Davidson, ed. College Curriculum at the Crossroads: Women of Color Reflect and Resist. Critical social thought. New York, NY: Routledge, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract

This book explores the ways in which college curriculum is complicated, informed, understood, resisted, and enriched by women of color.

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Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites Use Women's Labor and Ideas to Exploit the World
Eisenstein, Hester. Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites Use Women's Labor and Ideas to Exploit the World. Abingdon, Oxon, UK: Routledge, 2016. View the BookAbstract

In a pioneering reinterpretation of the role of mainstream feminism, Eisenstein shows how the world's ruling elites utilize women's labor and the ideas of women's liberation and empowerment to maintain their economic and political power, both at home and abroad. Her explorations range from the abolition of "welfare as we know it" in the United States to the creation of export-processing zones in the global South that depend on women's "nimble fingers"; from the championing of microcredit as a path to women's empowerment in the global South to the claim of women's presumed liberation in the West as an ideological weapon in the war on terrorism.

Eisenstein challenges activists and intellectuals to recognize that international feminism is at a fateful crossroads. She argues that it is crucial for feminists to throw in their lot with the progressive forces that are seeking alternatives to globalized corporate capitalism.

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Stone Butch Blues
Feinberg, Leslie. Stone Butch Blues. Ithaca, NY: Firebrand Books, 1993. View the BookAbstract
Jess Goldberg decides to come out as a butch in the bars and factories of the pre-feminist '60s and then to pass as a man in order to survive when she is left without work or a community in the early '70s.
Thank You for Your Service
Finkel, David. Thank You for Your Service. 1st ed. New York: Sarah Crichton Books/ Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2013. View the BookAbstract
From a MacArthur Fellow and the author of The Good Soldiers, a profound look at life after war. No journalist has reckoned with the psychology of war as intimately as David Finkel. In The Good Soldiers, his bestselling account from the front lines of Baghdad, Finkel shadowed the men of the 2-16 Infantry Battalion as they carried out the infamous surge, a grueling fifteen-month tour that changed all of them forever. Now Finkel has followed many of those same men as they've returned home and struggled to reintegrate--both into their family lives and into American society at large.
R.A.C.E. Mentoring Through Social Media: Black and Hispanic Scholars Share Their Journey in the Academy
Ford, Donna Y., Michelle Trotman Scott, and Ramon B. Goings, ed. R.A.C.E. Mentoring Through Social Media: Black and Hispanic Scholars Share Their Journey in the Academy. Contemporary perspectives on access, equity, and achievement. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing Inc, 2017. View the BookAbstract
Advice for scholars of color in how to survive and thrive in academia.
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Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body
Gay, Roxane. Hunger: A Memoir of (my) Body. First edition. New York: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, 2017. View the BookAbstract
New York Times bestselling author Roxane Gay has written with intimacy and sensitivity about food and bodies, using her own emotional and psychological struggles as a means of exploring our shared anxieties over pleasure, consumption, appearance, and health. With the bracing candor, vulnerability, and authority that have made her one of the most admired voices of her generation, Roxane explores what it means to be overweight in a time when the bigger you are, the less you are seen.
Bad Feminist: Essays
Gay, Roxane. Bad Feminist: Essays. First edition. New York: Harper Perennial, 2014. View the BookAbstract
In these funny and insightful essays, Roxane Gay takes us through the journey of her evolution as a woman (Sweet Valley High) of color (The Help) while also taking readers on a ride through culture of the last few years (Girls, Django in Chains) and commenting on the state of feminism today (abortion, Chris Brown). The portrait that emerges is not only one of an incredibly insightful woman continually growing to understand herself and our society, but also one of our culture.
Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America
Gonzales, Roberto G. Lives in Limbo: Undocumented and Coming of Age in America. Oakland, California: University of California Press, 2016. View the BookAbstract
This ethnography asks why highly educated undocumented youth ultimately share similar work and life outcomes with their less-educated peers, even as higher education is touted as the path to integration and success in America.
One More Theory About Happiness: A Memoir
Guest, Paul. One More Theory About Happiness: A Memoir. New York: Ecco, 2011. View the BookAbstract
A original memoir from the acclaimed poet and author about the accident that left him a paraplegic, and his struggle to find independence, love, and a life on his own terms.

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