Religion and Faith

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Growing up Muslim in Europe and the United States
Bozorgmehr, Mehdi, and Phillip Kasinitz, ed. Growing up Muslim in Europe and the United States. New York: Routledge, 2018. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This volume brings together scholarship from two different, and until now, largely separate literatures--the study of the children of immigrants and the study of Muslim minority communities--in order to explore the changing nature of ethnic identity, religious practice, and citizenship in the contemporary western world. With attention to the similarities and differences between the European and American experiences of growing up Muslim, the contributing authors ask what it means for young people to be both Muslim and American or European, how they reconcile these, at times, conflicting identities, how they reconcile the religious and gendered cultural norms of their immigrant families with the more liberal ideals of the western societies that they live in, and how they deal with these issues through mobilization and political incorporation. A transatlantic research effort that brings together work from the tradition in diaspora studies with research on the second generation, to examine social, cultural, and political dimensions of the second-generation Muslim experience in Europe and the United States, this book will appeal to scholars across the social sciences with interests in migration, diaspora, race and ethnicity, religion and integration.
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Muslims, Identity, and American Politics
Calfano, Brian Robert. Muslims, Identity, and American Politics. Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY: Routledge, 2018. View the BookAbstract
An examination of the pressures faced by Muslims, often considered political and social outsiders in western nations. Though citizens and second generation residents in many cases, American Muslims face a combination of suspicion, government scrutiny, and social segregation in the United States. The book examines how group influence, emotions, and religious interpretation contribute to the political orientation and behaviour of a national sample of Muslims living in the American context. A compelling explanation of how members of an ostracized political group marshal the motivation to become fully engaged political actors.
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Daughters of the Dust
Dash, Julie. Daughters of the Dust. Kino Video, 2000. View the FilmAbstract
Daughters of the Dust is a 1991 independent film written, directed and produced by Julie Dash and is the first feature film directed by an African-American woman distributed theatrically in the United States. Set in 1902, it tells the story of three generations of Gullah (also known as Geechee) women in the Peazant family on Saint Helena Island as they prepare to migrate to the North on the mainland.
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Becoming American?: The Forging of Arab and Muslim Identity in Pluralist America
Haddad, Yvonne Yazbeck. Becoming American?: The Forging of Arab and Muslim Identity in Pluralist America. Waco, TX: Baylor University Press, 2011. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
Countless generations of Arabs and Muslims have called the United States home. Yet while diversity and pluralism continue to define contemporary America, many Muslims are viewed by their neighbors as painful reminders of conflict and violence. In this concise volume, renowned historian Yvonne Haddad argues that American Muslim identity is as uniquely American it is for as any other race, nationality, or religion.
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Jewish American Paradox: The Chosen People and Modern Choices
Mnookin, Robert. Jewish American Paradox: The Chosen People and Modern Choices. Public Affairs, 2018. View the BookAbstract
In this thoughtful and perceptive book, Robert H. Mnookin argues that the answers of the past no longer serve American Jews today. The book boldly promotes a radically inclusive American-Jewish community--one where being Jewish can depend on personal choice and public self-identification, not simply birth or formal religious conversion. Instead of preventing intermarriage or ostracizing those critical of Israel, he envisions a community that embraces diversity and debate, and in so doing, preserves and strengthens the Jewish identity into the next generation and beyond.
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What Is an American Muslim?: Embracing Faith and Citizenship
Naʻīm, ʻAbd Allāh Aḥmad. What Is an American Muslim?: Embracing Faith and Citizenship. New York: Oxford University Press, 2014. View the eBook-Harvard Key RequiredAbstract
This title offers a pioneering exploration of American Muslim citizenship and identity, arguing against the prevalent emphasis on majority-minority politics and instead promoting a shared citizenship that both accommodates and transcends religious identity.
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Jewish Peoplehood: An American Innovation
Pianko, Noam. Jewish Peoplehood: An American Innovation. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2015. View the eBookAbstract
Although fewer American Jews today describe themselves as religious, they overwhelmingly report a strong sense of belonging to the Jewish people. Indeed, Jewish peoplehood has eclipsed religion—as well as ethnicity and nationality—as the essence of what binds Jews around the globe to one another. In Jewish Peoplehood, Noam Pianko highlights the current significance and future relevance of “peoplehood” by tracing the rise, transformation, and return of this novel term. 
If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Qurʼan
Power, Carla. If the Oceans Were Ink: An Unlikely Friendship and a Journey to the Heart of the Qurʼan. 1st ed. New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2015. View the BookAbstract
If the Oceans Were Ink is Carla Power's story of how she and her longtime friend Sheikh Mohammad Akram Nadwi found a way to confront ugly stereotypes and persistent misperceptions that were cleaving their communities. Their friendship -- between a secular American and a madrasa-trained sheikh -- had always seemed unlikely, but now they were frustrated and bewildered by the battles being fought in their names. Both knew that a close look at the Quran would reveal a faith that preached peace and not mass murder; respect for women and not oppression. And so they embarked on a yearlong journey through the controversial text. A journalist who grew up in the Midwest and the Middle East, Power offers her unique vantage point on the Quran's most provocative verses as she debates with Akram at cafes, family gatherings, and packed lecture halls, conversations filled with both good humor and powerful insights. Their story takes them to madrasas in India and pilgrimage sites in Mecca, as they encounter politicians and jihadis, feminist activists and conservative scholars.
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Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's Journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim
Rehman, Sabeeha. Threading My Prayer Rug: One Woman's Journey from Pakistani Muslim to American Muslim. First edition. New York: Arcade Publishing, 2016. View the BookAbstract
Threading My Prayer Rug is a richly textured reflection on what it is to be a Muslim in America today. Beginning with a sweetly funny, moving account of the author's arranged marriage, the author undercuts stereotypes and offers the refreshing view of an American life through Muslim eyes.
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The Nonreligious: Understanding Secular People and Societies
Zuckerman, Phil, Luke W. Galen, and Frank L. Pasquale. The Nonreligious: Understanding Secular People and Societies. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. View the eBookAbstract
Tis book is an empirically based, research-based, data-based overview of the social science of secularity. More and more social scientists have begun taking secularity seriously as a subject of study in its own right, and conceptual as well as empirical research on the nonreligious within sociology, psychology, and anthropology has been rapidly increasing and diversifying in recent years.