The Galileo Project for the Systematic Scientific Search for Evidence of Extraterrestrial Technological Artifacts

The goal of the Galileo Project is to bring the search for extraterrestrial technological signatures of Extraterrestrial Technological Civilizations (ETCs) from accidental or anecdotal observations and legends to the mainstream of transparent, validated and systematic scientific research. This project is complementary to traditional SETI, in that it searches for physical objects, and not electromagnetic signals, associated with extraterrestrial technological equipment.

Latest News

Brinson Prize Postdoctoral Fellowship for the Galileo Project

August 15, 2022
The Brinson Foundation  awarded a prestigious new postdoctoral fellowship to the Galileo Project, at the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian. The three-year fellowship will support an early-career scientist engaged in the Galileo Project, under the mentorship of the project head, Professor Avi Loeb. The Galileo Project is the first systematic scientific research program in search for potential artifacts or remnants of extraterrestrial technological civilizations or... Read more about Brinson Prize Postdoctoral Fellowship for the Galileo Project
Laura Domine from Stanford University

Laura Domine from Stanford University receives Keto-Galileo Postdoctoral Fellowship

May 12, 2022

It is my great pleasure to report that Laura Domine from Stanford University has accepted our offer of the first Keto-Galileo postdoctoral fellowship. Laura is scheduled to complete her PhD thesis in December 2022 and will start her appointment at Harvard on February 1, 2023. She has a broad education in physics and computer science, and the title of her thesis is: "Deep Learning-based LArTPC Event Reconstruction and Electron Neutrino Appearance Search in the ICARUS Detector".

 

Laura is the second postdoctoral fellow of the Galileo ...

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Project ground rules

  1. We do not work with classified information or unreliable past data.
  2. Our analysis of the data is based on known physics.
  3. Our data and analysis will be freely published, documented and archived.
  4. No results will be released except through scientifically-accepted channels of publication.

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The Galileo Project is funded through the generosity of many individual donors. Learn more how you can contribute to the project here.

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