Publications by Year: 2017

2017
Wodon Q, Male C, Nayihouba A, Onagoruwa A, Savadogo A, Yedan A, Edmeades J, Kes A, John N, Murithi L, et al. Economic Impacts of Child Marriage: Global Synthesis Brief. The Economic Impacts of Child Marriage [Internet]. 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.costsofchildmarriage.org/publication/economic-impacts-child-m...(Costs_of_Child_Marriage_Products7_6_2017)&mc_cid=4f5de93c86&mc_eid=43d63cddf5

 

 

The Economic Impacts of Child Marriage project is a collaborative effort by the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW) and the World Bank, with funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation, and additional support from the Global Partnership for Education.

 

Wodon Q, Savadogo A, Kes A. Economic Impacts of Child Marriage: Work, Earnings and Household Welfare Brief. The Economic Impacts of Child Marriage [Internet]. 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.costsofchildmarriage.org/publication/economic-impacts-child-m...(Costs_of_Child_Marriage_Products7_6_2017)&mc_cid=4f5de93c86&mc_eid=43d63cddf5

 

The brief summarizes results from an analysis of the impacts of child marriage on women’s work (specifically, labor force participation and type of work held), earnings and productivity and household welfare. It also estimates selected economic costs of these impacts.

 

Wodon Q, Male C, Onagoruwa A, Savadogo A, John N, Petroni S. Economic Impacts of Child Marriage: Women's Health Brief. The Economic Impacts of Child Marriage [Internet]. 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.costsofchildmarriage.org/publication/economic-impacts-child-m...(Costs_of_Child_Marriage_Products7_6_2017)&mc_cid=4f5de93c86&mc_eid=43d63cddf5

 

This brief summarizes results from an analysis of the impacts of child marriage on a few selected health outcomes, specifically early childbirths, maternal mortality and intimate partner violence. It does not include analyses for other aspects of women’s health that are likely to be affected by child marriage to various extents, such as maternal morbidity, obstetric fistula, female genital mutilation/cutting, sexually-transmitted infections (including HIV and AIDS) and psychological well-being.

Savadogo A, Onagoruwa N, Wodon Q. Economic Impacts of Child Marriage: Women's Decision Making & Selected Other Impacts Brief. The Economic Impacts of Child Marriage [Internet]. 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.costsofchildmarriage.org/publication/economic-impacts-child-m...(Costs_of_Child_Marriage_Products7_6_2017)&mc_cid=4f5de93c86&mc_eid=43d63cddf5

 

 

This brief summarizes results from an analysis on the impacts of child marriage on women’s decision-making ability within the household, land ownership, knowledge of HIV/AIDS, and birth registrations. While these topics are all related to agency, it should be emphasized that they do not together provide a comprehensive measure of agency, which is beyond the scope of this study.

 

Wodon Q, Onagoruwa A, Yedan A, Edmeades J. Economic Impacts of Child Marriage: Fertility and Population Growth Brief. The Economic Impacts of Child Marriage [Internet]. 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.costsofchildmarriage.org/publication/economic-impacts-child-m...(Costs_of_Child_Marriage_Products7_6_2017)&mc_cid=4f5de93c86&mc_eid=43d63cddf5

 

 

In this brief, we summarize results from an analysis of the impacts of child marriage on fertility and population growth and estimate the economic costs of these impacts.

 

Wodon Q, Nguyen MC, Yedan A, Edmeades J. Economic Impacts of Child Marriage: Educational Attainment Brief. Economic Impacts of Child Marriage [Internet]. 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.costsofchildmarriage.org/publication/economic-impacts-child-m...(Costs_of_Child_Marriage_Products7_6_2017)&mc_cid=4f5de93c86&mc_eid=43d63cddf5

 

 

In this brief, we summarize results from an analysis of the impacts of child marriage on educational attainment for girls and their children and document the extent to which keeping girls in school could help end child marriage.

 

Onagoruwa A, John N, Wodon Q. Economic Impacts of Child Marriage: Child Health and Nutrition Brief. The Economic Impacts of Child Marriage [Internet]. 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.costsofchildmarriage.org/publication/economic-impacts-child-m...(Costs_of_Child_Marriage_Products7_6_2017)&mc_cid=4f5de93c86&mc_eid=43d63cddf5

This brief summarizes results from an analysis of the impacts of child marriage on two health outcomes - under-five mortality and stunting - for young children. For the purposes of this brief, we focus on the impact of child marriage through early childbirths, as this is the mechanism through which child health and nutrition outcomes are most directly affected. There is a close correlation between child marriage and early childbirths in most countries - at a global level, six out of seven early childbirths take place within the context of child marriage. The brief does not include analyses for other aspects of child health that may also be affected by child marriage, nor does it consider costs that may be incurred by health systems as a result of poor child health.

Wodon Q, Male C, Nayihouba A, Onagoruwa A, Savadogo A, Yedan A, Edmeades J, Kes A, John N, Murithi L, et al. Economic Impacts of Child Marriage: Global Synthesis Report, in The Economic Impacts of Child Marriage. International Center for Research on Women ; 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.costsofchildmarriage.org/publication/economic-impacts-child-m...(Costs_of_Child_Marriage_Products7_6_2017)&mc_cid=4f5de93c86&mc_eid=43d63cddf5

 

The international community is increasingly aware of the negative impacts of child marriage on a wide range of development outcomes. Ending child marriage is now part of the Sustainable Development Goals. Yet investments to end the practice remain limited across the globe and more could be done. In order to inspire greater commitments towards ending child marriage, this study demonstrates the negative impacts of the practice and their associated economic costs. The study looks at five domains of impacts: (i) fertility and population growth; (ii) health, nutrition, and violence; (iii) educational attainment and learning; (iv) labor force participation and earnings; and (v) participation, decision-making, and investments. Economic costs associated with the impacts are estimated for several of the impacts. When taken together across countries, the costs of child marriage are very high. They suggest that investing to end child marriage is not only the right thing to do, but also makes sense economically. 

 

Jepsen K, Hansen KB. The Indigenous World 2017 UNDRIP 10 Years Special Edition. International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs [Internet]. 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.iwgia.org/publications/search-pubs?publication_id=760

 

The Indigenous World 2017 provides an update of the current situation for indigenous peoples worldwide and a comprehensive overview of the main global trends and developments affecting indigenous peoples during 2016.

The Indigenous World 2017 comes in a special edition marking the ten years anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The public launch took place April 25 2017 during the 16th session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York. 

Symbolically, it was launched on the same day, as the UN General Assembly marked the ten years anniversary of the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Fahmina T. When marriage is for money. New Age Opinion [Internet]. 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://www.newagebd.net/article/10775/when-marriage-is-for-money

FIFTEEN-year-old child bride Babli Akter’s fate took a horrible turn when she was allegedly killed by her husband Rashedul and her in laws on January 27 this year as her family could not pay the Tk 3 lakh as dowry (Manabzamin, January 28, 2017). Dowry is nothing more than marital extortion. Dowry marriage mostly consists of greed, humiliation and violence. Many women every year in Bangladesh are being killed, abused and even commit suicide simply due to the pervasive illegal practice of dowry related violence. According to Odhikar’s statistics, between January 2001 and January 2017, about 3,090 women were allegedly killed, 2064 were abused and 220 committed suicide because of dowry. This statistics shows just the tip of the iceberg as a lot of dowry related violence is kept in confidence to retain the ‘honour’ of the family. If there were no giving or taking of dowry, there would not be any dowry related violence. Dowry is illegal in Bangladesh under the Dowry Prohibition Act 1980 and Nari O Shishu Nirjatan Daman Ain 2000 (amended 2003). However, it still continues.

Ravindram TKS. An Advocates Guide: Integrating Human Rights in Universal Access to Contraception. Arrow [Internet]. 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

http://arrow.org.my/publication/advocates-guide-integrating-human-rights...

 

This guide, as the name suggests, is meant for use by advocates for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) at the country level. The guide uses the recommendations made to national governments in the publication “Ensuring human rights in the provision of contraceptive information and services: Guidance and recommendations” published by the World Health Organization in 2014, with the aim of ensuring that “the different human rights dimensions are systematically and clearly integrated into the provision of contraceptive information and services”.

The guide takes into account recommendations made by the WHO Guidance document, elaborates on what the recommendations actually mean, and provides a checklist with series of questions that probe into the extent of which a government has implemented or complied with a specific (set of) WHO recommendation (s). There are 17 such checklists, which together constitute a ‘tool box’ for assessing whether human rights are ensured in the provision of contraceptive information and services. The guide also provides an illustrative list of indicators for tracking adherence to human rights norms by contraceptive programmes.

The guide can be used by SRHR advocates, this includes women’s organisations, civil society organisations working on women, young people’s health and SRHR. The tool can also be used by health professionals within the health systems at the national level, as a resource and assessment tool for provision of rights based contraceptive information and services.

This advocate’s guide is meant as a generic tool. It will have to be adapted to different national and even sub-national settings, depending on its history of population control and the ethos of adherence to human rights, health system characteristics and resource levels.We hope this guide will enable SRHR advocates to use these WHO recommendations as a basis for holding governments accountable to respecting and upholding human rights in policies and strategies related to contraceptive information and services, and in the actual organisation and delivery of contraceptive services to users.

Organization IL, Nations U. Ending Violence against Women: Prevention and response in the world of work. 2017.Abstract

 

The International Labour Organization (ILO) has begun an historic standard-setting process on “Violence and harassment against women and men in the world of work”, the first discussion of which will take place at its International Labour Conference in June 2018. This discussion of a possible new Convention and Recommendation on violence and harassment takes place at a time when a range of researchers, decision makers and activists are increasingly understanding the importance of the world of work as a context to develop and implement strategies to prevent and to respond to violence and harassment against women, regardless of whether this occurs at work or elsewhere. 

 

Ending Violence against Women: Prevention and response in the world of work
Eldoseri HM, Sharps P. Risk Factors for Spousal Physical Violence Against Women in Saudi Arabia. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. 2017;I (25).Abstract

 

This study aimed to explore selected risk factors for spousal physical violence (SPV) in women frequenting primary health care clinics (PHCs) in Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study design was conducted in six PHCs, where one-on- one, private interviews with 200 women were conducted using a standardized World Health Organization (WHO) violence against women questionnaire (v.10.0). SPV was reported by 45.5% of women. Husband-specific risk factors including alcohol or drug addiction, unemployment, control of wealth in the family, and physical aggression toward other men were significant predictors for SPV. A multisectoral approach should be implemented with focus on providers’ training, women’s safety, and involvement of men in violence prevention and intervention programs. 

 

risk_factors_for_spousal_physical_violence_against_women_in_saudi_arabia.pdf